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SWAMPSCOTT 

MASSACHUSETTS 




Annual 
Town Report 

July 1, 2002 - June 30, 2003 



Cover photo: 

The original "Big Dig": the widening of Humphrey Street. The street needed to he 
graded, as well as widened, from the Lynn line to the Fish H ouse. The project hegan 
in 1914 and finished in 1917. Construction of the Fisherman's Beach seawall was 
also done at this time. 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY FIRST 
ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TOWN OFFICERS 



SWAMPSCOTT 
MASSACHUSETTS 



For the period July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2003 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport2002swam 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Swampscott was incorporated as a Town on May 21, 1852 



Situated: 
Population: 

Area: 

Assessed Valuation: 
Tax Rate: 



Form of Government: 



Governing Town Body: 



Governor: 

Attorney General: 

Secretary of the Commonwealth: 

State Legislative Body: 



United States Congress: 



Representative in Congress: 
Member of Governor's Council: 
Qualifications of voters: 



Registration: 
Where to Vote: 

Tax Bills: 



About 1 5 miles northeast of Boston 

State Census 2000, 14,412. Persons of all ages taken 

every year in Town Census 

3.05 square miles 

$1,892,843,508 

$13.52 Residential and Open Space 

$24.26 Commercial and Industrial 

$24.26 Personal 

Representative Town Meeting 

(Accepted May 17, 1927. First meeting held February 

27, 1928) 

Board of Selectmen 

Elihu Thomson Administration Building 

22 Monument Avenue 

Mitt Romney 

Thomas F. Reilly 

William F. Galvin 

Representing Swampscott: 

Senator Thomas Magee of Lynn (1 st Essex District) 

Representative Douglas W. Petersen (8 th Essex District) 

is the Representative in the General Court 

Massachusetts Representatives: 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

Senator John F. Kerry 

John Tierney (6 th Congressional District) 

Patricia Dowling of Lawrence (5 th District) 

Must be 18 years of age, born in the United States or 

fully naturalized in accordance with the provisions in 

Chapter 587, Acts of 1972 and Chapter 853, Acts of 

1 973, there is no duration residential requirement for 

"who is a resident in the city or town where he claims 

the right to vote at the time he registers" may be 

registered. 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Friday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. These hours are subject 
to change. Special sessions held preceding elections. 
1 & 2-Clarke School on Norfolk Avenue side adjoining 
park 

3 & 4-First Church on Monument Avenue 

5 & 6-High School on Forest Avenue 

Property taxes are assessed on a fiscal year basis 

which begins July 1 st and ends June 30 th . Payments are 

due quarterly on August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st 

and May 1 st . Interest is assessed after due dates at the 

rate of 1 9 percent per annum computed per day. 



3 



TOWN OFFICERS - 2003 
ELECTED 



Moderator 

Martin Goldman 

Board of Selectmen 

Marc R. Paster, Chair 

Daniel R. Santanello, Vice Chair 

Paul E. Levenson 

Reid J. Cassidy 

William R. Hyde, Sr. 

Carole B. Shutzer 

Board of Assessors 

Vera C. Harrington, Chair 
John V Phelan, III 
Neil Sheehan 

Board of Health 

Lawrence S. Block, MD, Chair 
Martha Pitman, MD 
Nelson Kessler 

Constables 

Paul Minsky 
Carl Reardon 
Stephen B. Simmons 



Housing Authority 

(2004) James L. Hughes, Chair (2004) 
Albert DiLisio (2006) 
Barbara Eldridge (2005) 

(2005) Patricia Krippendorf (2008) 
(2004) 

(2004) Planning Board 

(2005) Eugene Barden, Chair (2008) 

(2006) Jeffrey Blonder (2007) 

(2003) Veeder C. Nellis (2006) 
John V Phelan, III (2005) 
Richard T. Mcintosh (2004) 

(2005) 

(2006) School Committee 

(2004) Mary H. DeChillo, Chair (2004) 
Arthur Goldberg, Vice Chair (2004) 
Dan Yeager (2005) 

(2004) Shelley Sachett (2005) 

(2005) Philip Rotner (2006) 

(2006) Kevin F. Breen (did not seek re-election) (2003) 

Trustees of Public Library 

(2004) Carl Reardon, Chair (2005) 

(2004) Cynthia Zeman (resigned) (2004) 

(2004) John R. Karwowski (2006) 



4 



APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
(Appointments effective in FY 2003) 



Town Administrator 

Andrew Maylor (10/2007) 
Administrative Assistant 
Maureen Gilhooley (2003) 
Town Accountant 

David Castellarin (1/2006) 

Assistant Accountant 

Linda D'Ambrosio (2003) 

Animal Control Officer 

Richman Cassidy (2003) 

Inspector of Buildings 

& Inspector of Smoke 

Joseph Latronica (2003) 

Local Inspector 

Kathleen Magee (2003) 
Burial Agent 

Hugh J. Schultz (2003) 
Clerk/Collector 

Jack L. Paster (12/31/2004) 
Constables to Post Warrants & 
Other Similar Work 

Paul Minsky (2003) 
Constable for Serving 
Civil Process 

Junior Clark (2004) 
David H. Janes (2004) 
Ronald DePaolo (2004) 
Town Counsel 

Leonard Kopelman, Esquire (2003) 
Senior Building Custodian 
Brian Cawley (2003) 
Junior Custodian 

John J. Gliha (2003) 
Assistant Shellfish Constable 

Joseph C. Cardillo (2003) 
John T. Cawley (2003) 
Treasurer 

Denise Dembkoski (2003) 
Assistant Treasurer 

Elise Van Zoest (2003) 
Tree Warden 

Gene Gardiner (2003) 

Veterans' Service Agent 

Hugh J. Schultz (2003) 

Director of Public Health 

James J. Marotta (2003) 

Public Health Nurse 

June Blake, RN (2003) 



Director of Emergency 
Management 

Bruce Gordon 

Assistant Engineer 

Gino Cresta 

Fence Viewers 

Reid J. Cassidy 

Joseph Latronica 

Andrew Maylor 

Forest Warden 

Laurence J. Galante 

Graves Officer 

John Dipietro 

Assistant Graves Officer 

Robert B. Vernava 

Harbormaster 

Lawrence P. Bithell 

Permanent Appointment 7/1/98 

Assistant Harbormasters 

John T. Cawley 

William F. Hennessey 

Roger P. Bruley 

Roger Carroll 

Harris Tibbetts 

Keeper of the Lockup 

Ronald J. Madigan 

Network Specialist 

Michael Donovan 

Personnel Manager 

Nancy Lord 

Shellfish Constable 

Lawrence P. Bithell 

Assistant Veteran's Agent 

Steven DeFelice 

Weights & Measures Inspector 

Frances Corcoran 

Wire Inspector 

Daniel C. Cahill 

Assistant Wire Inspectors 

Gordon Lyons 

Ronald Marks 

Superintendent of Public Works 

Silvio Baruzzi 
Assistant Town Clerks 

Brenda Corso 
Marcia Willis 

Gas & Plumbing Inspector 

Peter T. McCarriston 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Michael Waldman 



(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 



(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 
(2003) 
& Town Engineer 

(2003) 

(2003) 
(2003) 

(2003) 

(2003) 



*ln accordance with the Town Charter, all appointments made by the Board of Selectmen, with the 
exception of the Town Administrator, are based on the recommendations of the Town Administrator. 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
(Appointments effective in FY 2003) 



ADA Oversight Committee 




Design Selection Committee 




Reid J. Cassidy 


(2003) 

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John V. Phelan, III 


(2003) 


Affirmative Action 




Louis Modini 


(2003) 


Reid J. Cassidy 


(2003) 


John M. Colletti 


(2003) 


Council on Aaina 




Earth Removal Advisory Committee 

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Mary Abramson, Chair 


(2004) 


Eugene Barden, Chair 


(2003) 


Estelle EDStein 


(2003) 


JoseDh CaDone 


f2004^ 


Marv Elizabeth Cobbett 


(2004) 


William Maher 


(2005) 


Felice Litman 

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(2004) 


Jacob Lee 


(2006) 


Susan Fisher 


(2005) 


Nelson Kessler 


(2006) 


Bea Breitstein 


(2005) 


Joseph Crimmins 


(2003) 


Marion Stone 


(2005) 


Daniel Dandreo, non-voting membGr 


(2003) 


Deborah Giovannucci 

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(2005) 


Laurence Galante, non-voting member 


(2003) 


Arlene Rosen 


(2006) 


Board of Election Commissioners 




Zonina Board of ADDeals 

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Linda J ThomDson Chair 


(2006) 


Edward Breen, Acting Chair 


(2003) 


Barbara Devereaux 


(2005) 


Robert Baker 


(2005) 


Edward Golden 


(2004) 


David Janes 


(2004) 


Paul DeBole 


(2006) 


Anthonv Scibelli 


(2003) 


Harbor Advisorv Committee 




Kenneth B. Shutzer 


(2003) 


Michael Gambale, Chair 


(2003) 


Associate Members 

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William F Hennessev Clerk 

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(2003^ 

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Damon Seligson 


(2003) 


Lawrence P. Bithell 


(2003) 


Donald Hause 


(2003) 

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John O'Shea 


(2003) 


Conservation Commission 




Peter C. McCarriston 


(2003) 


Geralyn P.M. Falco, Co-Chair 


(2006) 


Geralyn P.M. Falco 


(2003) 


Nelson Kessler, Co-Chair 


(2006) 


Historical Commission 




Mark Mahonev 


(2004) 


Svlvia Belkin Chair 


(2003) 


.lo^pnh Hrimmin^ 

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(2004) 


Doualas Maitland 


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Antigone Simmons 


(2005) 


Mary Doane Cassidy 


(2004) 


Tom Ruskin 

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(2004) 


Jean Reardon 

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(2003) 


Peter Vasilou 


(2003) 


Brian Best 


(2005) 


Associate Member 




Sheila Leahy 


(2003) 


Cultural Council 




David Callahan, Emiritus for life 




Cynthia Zeman, Chair 


(2004) 


Angela Ippolito 


(2005) 


Ellen M Reardon 

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(2004) 


Louis Gallo 




Elin Sorina 


(2004) 


Associate Members 




Marvann Revnolds 

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(2004) 


lark Rutterworth 

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(2005^ 

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Mark MrHunh 

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(2004) 


Insurance Advisorv Committee 

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Jill Soucv 

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(2004) 


Michael Cassidv 

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(2003) 


Sarah Hitchcock 

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(2004) 


Andrew Roberts 


(2003) 


Board of Public Works 

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SwamDscott Buildina Committee 

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1 awrpnrtp Pinariplln Chair 

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(2003) 


Dana Anderson 

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Robert Ward 


(2003) 


Charlie Baker 

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Milton Fistel 


(2003) 


Kevin Breen 




Rails to Trails Committee 

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Vinnie Camerlengo 




William DiMento, Esq. 


(2003) 


Steve Fox 




Sgt. William Waters 


(2003) 


Joe Markarian 




David Whelan, Jr. 


(2003) 


Chris Mauriello 




JoAnn Simons 


(2003) 


Andrew Maylor 




Margaret Barmack, Esq. 


(2003) 


Nick Menino 




Myles Brown 


(2003) 


Patricia Shanahan 





6 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
(Appointments effective in FY 2003) 



Recreation Commission 




Technology Committee 




Andrew B. Holmes, Chair 


(2005) 


Michael Donovan 


(2005) 


Eve Gambale 


(2006) 


Herb Belkin 


(2005) 


David Whelan 


(2005) 


Peter McNerney 


(2005) 


John Hughes, Jr. 


(2004) 


Tom Reid 


(2005) 


Mary Ellen Fletcher 


(2005) 


Neila Straub 


(2005) 


Paul Gorman 


(2004) 


Roberto Villanueva 


(2005) 


Leslie Kiely, Member at Large 


(2005) 


Kevin Breen 


(2005) 


Revitalization Committee 




Jeff Goldstein 


(2005) 


William DiMento, Esq. 


(2003) 


Traffic Study Committee 




Silvio Baruzzi 


(2003) 


Sid Novak, Chair 


(2003) 


Marc Paster 


(2003) 


Louise LaConte 


(2003) 


Jean Reardon 


(2003) 


Michael Patriarcha, appt. 3/1 1/03 


(2003) 


Deborah Shelkin Remis 


(2003) 


Silvio Baruzzi 


(2003) 


Peter McNerney 


(2003) 


Jeff Goldstein 


(2003) 


Brian Watson 


(2003) 


Sgt. John Behen 


(2003) 


Kenneth Shutzer 


(2003) 


Cpt. Dave Fessenden 


(2003) 


John Phelan 


(2003) 


Veterans' Affairs Committee 




Larry Scagglione 


(2003) 


Hugh J. Schultz 


(2003) 


Geralyn Falco 


(2003) 


John Stinson 


(2003) 


Richard Smith 


(2003) 


John DiPietro 


(2003) 


Keli Howe 


(2003) 


William Wollerscheid 


(2003) 


Safety/Security Committee 




War Memonal Scholarship Fund 




Laurence Galante 


(2003) 


Committee 




Joseph Latronica 


(2003) 


Joseph J. Balsama, Chair 


(2004) 


Ronald Madigan 


(2003) 


Jim Schultz, Ex Officio 


(2004) 


Sailing Subcommittee 




Eileen Ventresca, Secretary 


(2005) 


Agatha Morrell 


(2003) 


—f 1 1 — \ \ A 1 1 1 ■ 

Thomas B. White, Jr. 


(2004) 






Paul E. Garland 


(2004) 






James H. Lilly 


(2004) 






Ida S. Pinto 


(2004) 






Jean F. Reardon 


(2004) 






Barbara Eldridge 


(2005) 



*ln accordance with the Town Charter, all appointments made by the Board of Selectmen, with the 
exception of the Town Administrator, are based on the recommendations of the Town Administrator. 



REPRESENTATIVES, LIAISONS, DESIGNEES, COORDINATORS 



Clean Air & Oil Spill Coordinator 

Silvio Baruzzi 

Harardous Waste Coordinator 

James J. Marotta 

Labor Service Coordinator 

1 Vacancy 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation 
Authority 

Joseph J. Balsama 

Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority 

Silvio Baruzzi 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Brian Watson 



North Shore Task Force 

Brian Watson 

National Organization on Disability 
Liaison & Handicap Coordinator 

1 Vacancy 

Right to Know Law Coordinator 

Brian Cawley 

Massachusetts Bays Program 2003 
Representatives 

1 Vacancy 

North Shore Regional Vocational 
School District Representative 

Mary Marrs 

Winter Planning Coordinator 

Silvio Baruzzi 



8 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

Capital Inprovement Study Committee 

Mounzer Aylouche, Chair 
Dana Anderson 
Jack Fischer 
Nelson Kessler 
Lawrence Picariello 



Finance Committee 

Cynthia Merkle, Chair (2004) 

Mary Regan Marrs (2003) 

David Bowen (2005) 

Robert Jolly (2005) 

Cynthia McNerney (2004) 

Joseph Markarian (2003) 

Scott Burke (2003) 

Thomas Dawley (2005) 



Zoning By-Law Review Committee 

Robert Baker, Chair 
Scott Burke 
Kenneth Shutzer 
Eugene Barden 
Kathleen Magee 
Ann Whittemore 
Joseph Latronica 
Anthony Scibelli 
Andrew Maylor 



APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN AND MODERATOR 



Personnel Board 



Gene Nigrelli, Chair 
Mike Tumulty 
Peter C. McCarriston 
David Van Dam 
Debbie Freidlander 



(2003) 
(2003) 
(2004) 
(2005) 
(2006) 



Nancy Lord, Ex-Officio 



APPOINTED BY THE MASS. EMERGENCY RESPONSE COMMISSION 
Emergency Planning Committee 

Reid Cassidy, Chair, Board of Selectmen 
Ronald J. Madigan, Chief, Police Department 
Laurence J. Galante, Chief, Fire Department 
Nelson Kessler, Chair, Conservation Commission 
Bruce Gordon, Emergency Management Director 
Silvio Baruzzi, Superintendent, Public Works 
James J. Marotta, Director of Public Health 



APPOINTED BY PROBATE COURT 
Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship Committee 

Reverend Dean Pederson 
Dr. Brian Coughlin 
Dr. Peter M. Barker 



10 



APPOINTED BY THE CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD AND SELECTMEN 
AND ELECTED BY THE TOWN EMPLOYEES 
Contributory Retirement Board 

John Kiely, Chair - appointed by the Retirement Board (2006) 
Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. - appointed by the Board of Selectmen (2005) 
John Behen, Employee Representative - (2005) 
Christopher Thomson, Employee Representative - (2004) 
David Casterllarin, Ex-Officio, Town Accountant 

APPOINTED OR ELECTED BY ORGANIZATIONS 
OF THE EMPLOYEES AFFECTED 
Group Insurance Advisory Ccommittee 

Thomas Stephens, Police Department Representative 
James Snow, Fire Department Representative 
Dorothy Forman, Izzy Abrams & Maureen McCarthy, Library Representatives 
Judy Kenney, School Representative 
Sheryl Levenson, Town Hall Representative 
Nancy Lord, Non-Union employee Representative 
Carl Reardon, Department of Public Works & Custodians Representatives 

Union Presidents 

Police Department - Thomas Stephens 
Fire Department - James Snow 
Library - Dorothy Forman & Izzy Abrahms 
Teachers - Pat Shanahan 
School Custodians & Cafeteria Workers - Carl Reardon 
School Secretaries - Nancy Olson (at High School) 
Public Works - Carl Reardon ( at High School) 
Town Hall Clerical - Carl Reardon 



11 



DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 



OFFICERS 

Margaret A. Somer (Chair) 
Jeffrey Blonder (Vice-Chair) 
Mary Regan Marrs (Clerk) 
Ted Patrikis (Treasurer) 

REGULAR MEMBERS 

Reid Cassidy 
Mary Dechillo 
Barbara Devereaux 
Ralph (Skip) DiPesa 
Thomas Driscoll 
Doris Feldman 
Sophie Godley 
Ed Golden 
Fran Golden 
Richard Huber 
Nancy Kaufman 
Sheila Kearney 
John Maloney 
Chris Mauriello 
John Moynihan 
Mark Mulgay 
Dan Munnelly 
Marc Paster 
David Richmond 
Marcia Richmond 
Burt Rosenthal 
Bill Shanahan 
Carole Shutzer 
Antigone Simmons 
Jim Smith 
Gary Young 
Mona Young 

LIFETIME MEMBERS 

Edythe Baker 
Robert Baker 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Dan Diamant 
Cheryl DiPesa 
Ed Kalman 
Representative Doug Petersen 
Alix Smullin 
Gerdy Weiss 



12 



REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 



REGULAR MEMBERS 

Budreair William 
Butters, Bryan 
Butters, John 
Butters, Joy 
Chelsey, Bruce 
Cross, David 
Collins, Henry J. 
Hall, Jeanne 
Leger, Michael 
McGrath, Kevin 
McGrath, Marianne 
Minsky, Paul 
Mizioch, Lauren 
Palleschi, Arthur 
Palleschi, Edward 
Perry, Frank Sr. 
Perry, Frank Jr. 
Perry, Frank III 
Perry, Marilyn 
Perry, Robert - Chair 
Sinatra, Beverly 
Sinatra, Joseph 
Taubert, Alan 
Tennant, Alexander 
Tennant, Cynthia 
Thompson, Anneliese 
Thompson, Glen 
Thompson, Linda 
Thompson, Susan 
Williams, Tracy 
Withrow, Mary Susan 
Withrow, Robert 
Wood, Mike 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Bargoot, Joyce 
Barr, Sam 
Mancini, Francis A. 

Paster, Jack 
Wamock, Donald Jr. 



13 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 



The header to this report is indication enough of the significant changes that have 
transpired during the past twelve months. The implementation of the new Town Charter adopted 
by the State Legislature and the voters of Swampscott during fiscal 2002 has begun. After more 
than five months and sixty applicants the Town Administrator Search Committee recommended 
the names of three finalists to the Board of Selectmen. At the Board of Selectmen's meeting on 
September 10, 2002, the Board voted unanimously to select Andrew W. Maylor, as the Town's 
first Town Administrator. Andrew's background included more than seventeen years of public 
and private experience with the last six years being spent with the City of Chelsea in various 
senior management positions including Acting City Manager and Deputy City Manager. 

Andrew 's first day was October 7, 2002, and the era of centralized administration and 
municipal service delivery began. The Charter called for the Town Administrator to present an 
annual financial forecast by the fifteenth of November each year to a joint meeting of the School 
Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee. The Town Administrator presented the 
first such forecast on November 14, 2002. 

In the fall of 2002, the Board of Selectmen accepted the provisions of the state 
sponsored Early Retirement Incentive. By December 31, 2002, twenty employees had taken 
advantage of the program and retired. Among those that retired was former Executive Secretary, 
Patricia George. With that as a backdrop, the Town Administrator presented a reorganization 
plan, which would help the Town realize an annualized savings of more than $20,000 while 
enhancing municipal service delivery. As part of the plan, Technology Specialist, Denise 
Dembkoski, assumed the duties of Town Treasurer, previously performed by the Collector/Clerk. 
The Inspector of Buildings assumed supervisory authority of the Plumbing and Electrical 
Inspectors and the responsibilities of personnel administration were centralized and assumed by 
Nancy Lord, who had previously served as an Administrative Assistant to the Board of 
Selectmen. 

In early 2003, the Board of Selectmen adopted a series of "Fundamental Principles" to be 
used by the Town Administrator as guideposts for running a professional, efficient, competent 
and responsive government. These principles address municipal service delivery in five 
categories. The five categories are Financial, Neighborhood Enhancement, Community 
Development, Public Safety and Governmental Philosophy. 

In January of 2003, the Board of Selectmen received a request from the Attorney 
General's Office to discontinue holding public meetings in the Elihu Thomson Administration 
Building (Town Hall) until upgrades could be made to improve handicapped accessibility to the 
building. In February 2003, the Massachusetts Historical Commission endorsed a proposal to 
remove the elevated area of the first floor of the building for the purpose of creating a clear and 
accessible path of travel to the Douglas F. Allen Meeting Room. A public bid was issued in April 
2003, and there is every reason to believe that before the end of the calendar year 2003, public 
meetings will resume in this wonderful historical building. 

In February 2003, the Personnel Board, Personnel Manager and the Town Administrator 
began work on a complete re-write of the Town's twenty-five year old Personnel By-law. The 
revisions were presented to the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Town Meeting and 
met with unanimous support. On May 19, 2003, Town Meeting voted to adopt the Personnel 
Policy Governing Compensation and Employment Benefits replacing the existing Personnel 
Board By-Laws. The new policy will greatly assist the Town in effectively addressing personnel 
related issues, which did not exist with the previous version of the Personnel Board By-laws. At 
the conclusion of this substantial undertaking, long standing Personnel Board member and 
Chairman, Gene Nigrelli, resigned from the Board having felt that many of the issues that 
compelled him to serve had been addressed with the adoption of the updated policy. The Board 
of Selectmen would like to recognize Mr. Nigrelli for his extraordinary commitment to the 
Personnel Board and wish him well in all his future endeavors. 

On March 7, 2003, the Town Administrator submitted to the Board of Selectmen the first 
budget based upon the provisions of the new Charter. Although Fiscal 2004 posed economic 
challenges not faced by municipalities in at least a decade, the budget presented to the Board of 



14 



Selectmen recommended no layoffs and left reasonable balances in reserve accounts. At the 
March 11, 2003 meeting, the Board of Selectmen endorsed the $40.4 million plan prepared by 
the Town Administrator, unanimously adopting it without amendment. As required by the Charter, 
this budget included school department spending and was forwarded to the Finance Committee 
for further action. 

On June 23, 2003, the Board of Selectmen and Swampscott Historical Commission were 
presented with plans for the renovation and expansion of the Elihu Thomson Administration 
Building. The design includes a three-story connector between the main house and carriage 
house, full handicapped accessibility (including an elevator), restoration of the exterior and 
updating the mechanical and electrical systems. The cost of the project was estimated at 
approximately $2,100,000, of which one-third of the project would go to deferred maintenance 
items. Reinhardt and Associates prepared the design at a cost of $60,000. A $30,000 grant was 
received from the Massachusetts Historical Commission, defraying a portion of that cost to the 
Town. 

The Board would like to take this opportunity to express its appreciation to all those 
individuals who have taken time away from their families and friends to serve on the many 
committees, commissions and boards. The Board is grateful for the wide array of knowledge and 
skill that each individual brings to these committees providing a positive future for the Town. The 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator would like to recognize the effort of 
Administrative Assistant, Maureen Gilhooley, who has assimilated extraordinarily well since being 
hired in February 2003. 

It is both an honor and privilege to serve the Town as members of the Board of 
Selectmen and we appreciate the opportunity you have given to each of us to do so. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marc R. Paster, Chair 
Daniel R. Santanello, Vice Chair 
Reid J. Cassidy (Chair - 2002) 
William Hyde, Sr. 
Paul E. Levenson 

Carole B. Shutzer (through April 2003) 
Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator 



15 



2002 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Return of Service: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town 
of Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, and at least two 
public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the town and at or in the immediate 
vicinity of the Swampscott railroad Station. Said posting was done on October 11, 2002, 
and not less than fourteen (14) days before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrant and Annual Report: 

The Warrants for the Special Town Meeting were mailed to Town Meeting members on 
October 10, 2002. Copies of the Annual Report for the 18 th month period, January 1, 
2001 to June 30, 2002 were mailed to Town Meeting members in the same package. 
Copies of the Warrant and Annual Report were also available free of charge to any 
interested person at the Town Administration Building. 

Notice of Special Town Meeting: 

To the Town Meeting Members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 3, of the Bylaws of 
the Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, October 
28, 2002, beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on 
Greenwood Avenue. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

Meeting Certifications: 

I hereby certify that the Special Town Meeting of October 28, 2002 was held in the 
Swampscott Middle School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 
7:01 pm with the necessary quorum being present (289). 

I hereby certify that at 10:41 pm on October 28, 2002 the Special Town Meeting was 
dissolved. 



16 



Legal Advertisement Published: 



In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott the following legal 
advertisement was published, as indicated, concerning the session of Town Meeting: 

TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Office of the Town Clerk 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article n, Section 2 of the By-Laws of the 
Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, October 28, 
2002 beginning at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on 
Greenwood Avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Item Jack L. Paster 

10/1 1/2002 Clerk of Swampscott 



Attendance: 

For the 2002 Special Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this 
report. 

TOWN MEETING ACTION 

Town Clerk Jack L. Paster read the Return of Service. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman introduced various town officers. Reid Cassidy, chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen, introduced Andrew Maylor, the town's first Town 
Administrator. 



ACTION UNDER THE ARTICLES 



ARTICLE 1. To hear and act on the reports of the Town Officials, Boards and 
Committees 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

No votes taken under article 1 . The Town Meeting heard reports from the chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen and the chairman and members of the School Committee as well as 
their respective representatives. 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by gift, purchase, or otherwise and to accept the grant to the inhabitants of the 
Town of a permanent easement in, under, through, across, upon, and along a portion of 
the property located at 207 Forest Avenue, now or formerly owned by Tedesco Country 
Club, (the Tedesco easement) being a portion of the property shown as Lots 35, 31, and 
25, and as set forth in the easement plan, on Plate 17 of the Swampscott Assessor's Map, 

17 



for the purpose of constructing fields and recreational facilities, upon such terms and 
conditions as the Board shall determine appropriate, and to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow a sum of money for such purposes, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 2. That this article be adopted as presented. 

Unanimous Vote. 
10/28/2002 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by gift, purchase, or otherwise and to accept the grant to the inhabitants of the 
Town of a permanent easement in, under, through, across, upon, and along a portion of 
the property located along the Carson Terrace right of way, now or formerly owned by 
Bardon Trimount, Inc., Aggregate Industries, Inc. (the Aggregate easement) being a 
portion of the property shown as Lot 99, and as set forth in the easement plan, on Plate 12 
on the Swampscott Assessor's Map, for the purpose of constructing fields and 
recreational facilities, upon such terms and conditions as the Board shall determine 
appropriate, and to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow a sum 
of money for such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 3. That this article be adopted as presented. 

Unanimous Vote. 
10/28/2002 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to create a School Building Committee to be 
appointed by the Moderator in accordance with the provision of MGL Chapter 71, §68, 
with not less than seven (7) or more than nine (9) members, including the Superintendent 
of Schools or his designee, two (2) members of the School Committee, one (1) member 
of the teaching staff, the High School Principal, one (1) member of the Finance 
Committee, and the remaining two (2) to four (4) members citizens or employees of the 
Town of Swampscott, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 4. That the Town create a School Building Committee to be appointed by 
the Moderator in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
71, Section 68, with not less than seven (7) or more than nine (9) members. 

Majority Vote. 
10/28/2002 



18 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and borrow the sum of forty- 
seven million dollars ($47,000,000) for the purpose of planning, designing, constructing 
and furnishing a High School on Essex Street at the current site of Jackson Park, fields 
and recreational facilities on the so-called "Aggregate easement" site described in Article 
3 of this warrant, and fields and recreational facilities on the so-called "Tedesco 
easement" site described in Article 2 of this warrant, said funds for this purpose to be 
expended by a School Building Committee with the approval of the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee and authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue any bonds or notes that may be necessary for the above stated 
purposes, as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, §7, MGL Chapter 70B, or by any other 
general or special law, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the School 
Committee to submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all applications deemed necessary 
for grants and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the 
United States under any state and/or federal programs and to receive and accept such 
grants or reimbursement for this purpose, and/or any others in any way connected with 
the scope of this Article, provided, however, that this appropriation and debt 
authorization be contingent upon passage of a Proposition 2Vfc debt exclusion referendum 
under MGL Chapter 59, §21C(k), and provided further, that except for the sum of three 
million two hundred thousand dollars ($3,200,000) which may be borrowed pursuant to 
this vote to pay costs of developing architectural plans and specifications necessary for 
the placement of this project on The Commonwealth of Massachusetts' School Building 
Assistance Priority List, so-called, or any other similar list, no other amounts may be 
borrowed under the authority of this vote until the Town shall have received written 
evidence that the project authorized hereby has been placed upon The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts' School Building Assistance Priority List, so-called or any other similar 
list, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 5. That this article be adopted as presented. 

Roll Call Vote: 244, yes; 46, no. 
10/28/2002 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court to enact special legislation changing the use of portions of the 
town owned park land on Essex Street known as Jackson Park from its current 
recreational use to the site of a new high school, and to transfer the care, custody, 
maintenance and control of those portions from the Board of Public Works to the School 
Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 6. That this article be adopted as presented. 

Unanimous Vote. 
10/28/2002 



19 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will place the care, custody, control and maintenance 
of the Tedesco easement described in Article 1 and the Aggregate easement described in 
Article 2 to the School Committee so long as the same are used for such activities as are 
permitted within the grants themselves, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 7. That this article be adopted as presented. 

Unanimous Vote. 
10/28/2002 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will transfer $475,000 from the Assessor's Overlay 
Surplus Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue to be used and applied 
by the Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 8. That this article be adopted as presented. 

Unanimous Vote. 
10/28/2002 



20 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 



Special Town Meeting Financial Report 



Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Enterprise 


From: 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


Fund 


Bonding 


New High School 


$47,000,000 








$47,000,000 


























TOTAL 


$47,000,000 








$47,000,000 



21 



Swampscott Special Town Meeting Attendance - 10/28/2002 



Pre 


Name 


1 0/28/02 





Adams, Deborah 


X 


1 


Adams, Ryan 


o 


1 


Alpert, Julius H. 


o 


1 


Baldacci, Richard R. 


X 


1 


Bartram - DePaolo, Amanda S. 


X 


1 


Bartram, Glenn D. 


X 


1 


Batchelder, Kathleen 


X 


1 


r~) ± \ » / II ~T~ 

Bates, Wallace T. 


X 


1 


Bickford, Barbara 


X 


1 


Birchmore, Sally 


X 


1 


Bitman, Bernard 


X 


1 


Blonder, Cindy M. 


X 


1 


Blonder, Jeffrey S. 


X 


1 


Brenner, Lawrence 


X 


1 


Buchanan, Susan 


X 


1 


Chouinard, Conrad L 


X 


1 


Chouinard, Madeline 


X 


1 


Cresta, Qino A. Jr. 


o 


1 


Cropley, John H. Jr. 


X 


1 


Dandreo, Robert 


v/ 

X 


1 


Doherty-Healey, Mary 


X 


1 


Feinberg, Helen 1. 


X 


1 


Finlay, Patricia 


X 


1 


uallant, Cheryl 


o 


1 


Cenest, Lee Bartlett 


X 


1 


Harrington, Vera C. 


X 


1 


Healey, Thomas J. 


X 


1 


Hyde, Sally A. 


o 


1 


Hyde, William H. 


o 


1 


Jaeger, Hobert C. 


\/ 

X 


1 


Johnson, Maryalice 


X 


1 


Kaloust, Laerald J. 


X 


1 


Kaloust, Hoberta A. 


X 


1 


Kearney, Sheila 


X 


1 


Kessler, Nelson 


X 


1 


Legere, Arthur J. 


X 


1 


Lombard, James 


X 


1 


Maher, William M. 


X 


1 


Maitland, J. Hichard 


X 


1 


Maitland, Susan 


X 


1 


Marrs, Mary Regan 


X 


1 


Montague, Neil 


X 


1 


Patrikis, Theodore A. 


X 


1 


Perry, Robert L. 


X 


1 


Perry, Stetanie 


o 


1 


Picariello, John A. 


X 


1 


Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


1 


Rizzo, John F. 


X 


1 


Shannon, Cynthia 


X 


1 


Shapiro, Barbara R. 


X 


1 


Ai :i i_ ki : r*i 

Shiloh, Naomi R. 


X 




Speranza, Frances M. 


X 




Speranza-Hartmann, Marianne 


X 




Whittier, Douglas 


X 



22 



Swampscott Special Town Meeting Attendance - 10/28/2002 



Pre 


Name 


1 0/28/02 


2 


Barden, Eugene 


v 
A 


2 


Best, Mary A. 


v 
A 


2 


Booras, Peter 


v 
A 


2 


Bowen, David 


v 

X 


2 


Brown, Mary Lisa 


v 

A 


2 


Cameron, Janell A. 


V 
A 


2 


Carrigan, Lisa 


X 


2 


uassidy, I imothy P. 


X 


2 


Curry, Martha 


X 


2 


uoherty, Daniel t. 


v 
A 


2 


Doherty, John J. 


X 


2 


Dunn, Judith F. 


X 


2 


Dunn, Larry 


X 


2 


uiosa, Kelhe 


u 


2 


Hebert, Donald 


X 


2 


Hebert, Janet 


X 


2 


Higgins, Wilbur III 


o 


2 


Hitchcock, Sarah P. 


X 


2 


Hoey, Robin 


X 


2 


Huber, Carol 


X 


2 


Huber, Richard 


X 


2 


Hunt, Kim 


X 


2 


Hunt, btephen 


X 


2 


Jackson, Lorene 


X 


2 


Laband, Andrew 


X 


2 


Lauonte, Louise M. 


\/ 

X 


2 


LaConte, Vincent A. 


X 


2 


Lyons, Sean 


X 


2 


Lyons, Wendy A. 


X 


2 


Marcou, Martha L. 


X 


2 


McHugh, Terri 


o 


2 


Murphy, Brian C. 


X 


2 


Myette, Robert 


X 


0% 

2 


Newhall, Linda A. 


X 


2 


Newhall, Walter 


X 


2 


Owens, Charles 


X 


2 


n ~-.ii i ■ r~ _ i . i a 

Palleschi, Edward A. 


X 


2 


|~**> j 4 , tl!_L — 1 

Pitman, Michael 


X 


2 


Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


X 


2 


r"> i i — 1 1 t m 

Reardon, Ellen M. 


X 




Richmond, David E. 


X 


2 


Romano, John L. 


X 


2 


Rubin, Debra 


X 


2 


Ruggiero, John 


X 


2. 


Ryan, Leah 


X 


2 


Schultz, Jackson 


X 


2 


Shanahan, Joseph E. Jr. 


X 


2 


* ■ ■ * i Hill 1 1 

Sinrich, Michael 


O 


2 


Strauss, Danielle 


X 


2 


Strauss, Mathew 


X 


2 


Sullivan, Brian 


X 


o 
e 


WheLan, Jean 


u 


2 


Whelan, David 


X 


2 







23 



Swampscott Special Town Meeting Attendance - 10/28/2002 



rre 


Name 


1 0/28/02 


3 


Barden, Michele Cobban 


v 
A 


o 

o 


Bennett, Ralph E. II 


v 
A 


o 
o 


Boggs, Deborah 


V 
A 


3 


Breen, Kevin 


A 


o 
o 


Breen, Leslie A. 


v 
A 


3 


Campbell, Michael S. 


v 
A 


3 


Cardenas, Patricia 


v 
A 


3 


Cassidy, John R. 


v 
A 


3 


Coletti, John M. 


v 
A 


3 


Cormier, Kathleen 


v 
A 


3 


Dandreo, Daniel J. Ill 


u 


3 


Donahue, Linda Bray 


o 


3 


Donnelly, Robert 


v 
A 


3 


Doolan, James E. 


U 


3 


Driscoll-Fields, Anne 


v 
A 


3 


Eldridge, Barbara F. 


v 
A 


3 


Frenkel, Lenora T. 


v 
A 


3 


Frenkel, Richard 


X 


3 


Gay, Donna 


V/ 

A 


o 

3 


Gilberg, Richard 


U 


3 


Golden, Edward 


u 


3 


Goodwin, Jeremy 


u 


3 


Hayes, Paul E. 


X 


3 


Holmes, Betty Dean 


v 
X 


3 


ludice, Michael A. 


V 


3 


Jolly, Linda J. 


v 
X 


3 


Jolly, Robert V. Jr. 


X 


3 


Kelleher, Martha G. 


X 


3 


Lawlor, James C. 


X 


3 


Ledbury, Lisa J. 


X 


3 


Legere, Donald R. Jr. 


X 


3 


Lincoln, Lonng B. Jr. 


X 


o 

3 


Lincoln, Maria F. 


X 


3 


Luke, Gerald 


X 


3 


Magee, Kathleen 


X 


3 


Marvosh, Smilia 


X 


3 


Mcintosh, Richard T. 


X 


3 


Meister, Bunny Young 


X 


3 


Moltz, Sandra 


X 


3 


rerry, Gerard U. 


X 


3 


Richard, Dianne 


X 


3 


Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 


X 


3 


Sainato, Maryann 


X 


3 


Sheehan, Neil G. 


X 


3 


Stone, James S. Sr. 


X 


3 


Thomsen, Maureen 


v 
X 


3 


Vogel, John M. 


X 


3 


Vogel, Kristen S. 


X 


3 


Weaver, David 


X 


3 


Webster, Mary 


X 


3 


Welch, Thomas F. 


X 


o 


wmte-ueraoio, Jan 


Y 

A 


3 


Wright, Suzanne 


o 


3 


Zeman, Cynthia 


X 



24 



Swampscott Special Town Meeting Attendance - 10/28/2002 



rre 


INaillc 


1 n/oft/no 


4 


Anderson, Dana 


v 

A 


4 


Ddftci, JdllfcM IN. 




A 

4 


R a 1 1 i rn Anita 


A 


A 

4 


Ddibdiiid, josepri J. 


v 
A 


A 

4 


DdlUfcin, IVIdrO 


Y 
A 


A 

4 


( v d o o I t~i \ i f rannic 1 Ir 
OdoblUy, i IdMUlo J. \Jl . 


Y 

A 


A 

4 


OdbSluy, IVIdNiyil 1 . 




A 

4 


OfcJGII, Odrdll r. 


Y 
A 


A 

4 


udwiey, i nomds 


Y 
A 


/I 
4 


ueoniiio, ividry n. 


Y 
A 


4 


uiivienio, Odroi 


Y 
A 


A 

4 


niMantrv \A/illiam R 

uiivienio, vviiiiam n. 


Y 
A 


4 


uoneian, nouen c. 


Y 
A 


A 

4 


ummmona, Brian j. 


Y 
A 


4 


urummona, tnen ivi. 


Y 
A 


4 


Ill ■ r f \ / I— ' tmi r~i f\ 

uurry, rauiine 


Y 
A 


4 


Falco, Michael 


Y 
A 


4 


I— /-\ 1 c\\ § DU\ / 1 1 1 o Coro fin i 

roiey, rnynis oeraTini 


Y 
A 


A 

4 


uoiuman, ins 


Y 
A 


4 
4 


Laouureau, v_<onnie 


Y 
A 


4 


Hall Ha\/iH 
nail, UdVIU 


Y 
A 


4 


l-li innac lo/"»L" 

nuyrics, jacr, 


Y 
A 


4 


nugnes, iNancy i . 


Y 
A 


A 
4 


lAnncnn Anno 

uunnson, nnne 


Y 
A 


4 


lc a afar 1 a 

rveeier, i em 


Y 
A 


4 
*♦ 


r\inney, Jdcqueuns 


Y 
A 


4 


rMippenuon, tawara vv. or. 


KJ 


4 


Leger, Jeanne 


Y 
A 


A 
4 


ivicoiung, iviicnaei u. 


Y 
A 


4 


MCNerney, uyninia 


v 
A 


4 


ivieninno, onrisune 


Y 
A 


A 
4 


rviorrerii, iNunzio 


Y 

A 


4 


vj Drien, Laurie 


Y 
A 


A 
4 


rasxer, jacK l. 


Y 
A 


4 


rneian, jonn v. ■ ■ ■ 


Y 
A 


4 


Poska, Matthew 


Y 
A 


A 
4 


Powell, Amy 


Y 
A 


4 


Reagan, John 


Y 
A 


A 
4 


Santanello, Daniel 


Y 
A 


1 


ociDeiii, Antnony a. 


Y 
A 


4 

*T 


oouidiTiicro, uerinis ivi. 


Y 
A 


4 


Shanahan, Patricia D. 


Y 
A 


4 


Shanahan, William E. 


Y 
A 


4 


onore, vaeraiuine j. 


Y 
A 


4 


Shore; Warren 


Y 
A 


4 


oomer, Margaret a. 


Y 
A 


A 


Squires, Deborah 


Y 

A 


A 
1 


Squires, John Jr. 


Y 
A 


4 


Stone, Myron S. 


Y 
A 


4 


Vaucher, Catherine M. 


Y 
A 


4 


Wagner, Elizabeth Swift 


Y 
A 


4 


vvdiio, uuuy 


n 

W 


4 


Weaver, Sharon 


X 


4 


Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 


X 



25 



Swampscott Special Town Meeting Attendance - 10/28/2002 



Pre 


Name 


1 0/28/02 


5 


Akim, Marta 


o 


5 


Belhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 


o 


5 


Belhumeur, Thomas R. 


o 


5 


Bermani, Doris P. 


x 


5 


Burke, Scott Douglas 


x 


5 


Bush, Fred 


x 


5 


Caplan, Edward 


x 


5 


Carangelo, Lisa 


x 


5 


Carr, Heather M. 


x 


5 


Cerra, Anthony W. Jr. 


x 


5 


Chapman, Randy 


x 


5 


Connolly, Loretta 


x 


5 


Devlin, Michael K. 


x 


5 


Forman, Amy 


x 


5 


Garner, Ronald 


x 


5 


Gil, Desiree 


x 


5 


Goldman, Charles 


x 


5 


Goldsmith, Alice 


x 


5 


Hennessey, William F. 


x 


5 


Jancsy, John F. 


x 


5 


Karwowski, John R. 


x 


5 


Keller, ellen Long 


x 


5 


Lawler, John 


x 


5 


Lawler, Sami 


x 


5 


Levy, Eric 


x 


5 


Lewis, Susan E. 


x 


5 


Lipson, Philip 


x 


5 


Nellis, Veeder C. 


x 


5 


Patkin, Randall 


x 


5 


Potash, Leola 


x 


5 


Pye, Darlene 


x 


5 


Reardon, Carl 


x 


5 


Reichert, Leslie E. 


x 


5 


Rodenstein, Claudia 


x 


5 


Rogers, Roberta C. 


x 


5 


Rossman, Neil 


x 


5 


Rubin, Ken 


x 


5 


Samilijan, Peter 


x 


5 


Sneirson, Gerald 


x 


5 


Spartos, Mary Anne 


x 


5 


Steinman, Roy 


o 


5 


Stephens, Thomas J. 


o 


5 


Sullivan, Jill 


x 


5 


Talkov, Roger 


x 


5 


Toner, Colleen 


x 


5 


Tripolsky, Sharon Jaffe 


x 


5 


Van Dam, David S. 


x 


5 


Vanderburg, Linso 


o 


5 


Wayne, Kenneth 


o 


5 


Wilson, Catherine 


o 


5 


Winston, Alice Jane 


x 


5 


Zarinsky, Irma 


X 


5 


Zeller, David E. 


X 


5 


Zuchero, William R. 


X 



26 



Swampscott Special Town Meeting Attendance - 10/28/2002 



Pre 


Name 


1 0/28/02 


6 


Baker, Robert 


x 


6 


Bayard, Susan 


X 


6 


Beerman, Jack 


x 


6 


Block, Ina-Lee 


x 


6 


Block, Lawrence S. 


x 


6 


Burgess, Sue 


x 


6 


Burke, Michael F. 


x 


6 


Cassidy, Reid J. 


x 


6 


Cassidy-Driscoll, Tara L. 


x 


6 


Dembowski, Claire C. 


x 


6 


Derr, Jo Ann Simons 


x 


6 


DiLisio, Robert 


x 


6 


Driscoll, Thomas H. Jr. 


x 


6 


Dussault, Barbara 


x 


6 


Erlich, Norman 


x 


6 


Gold Anne W 

l\-4 , /Mill %0 V V • 


x 


6 


Goldbera Arthur 


x 


6 


Goldman, Jeffrey W. 


x 


6 


Gorman, Paul J. 


x 


6 


Gupta, Mary Kelley 


x 


6 


Horwitz, Patricia Kravtin 


x 


6 


Kane, Susan K. 


x 


6 


Klayman, Nancy 


x 


6 


Koidin, Jill 


x 


6 


Levenson, Paul E. 


x 


6 


Levenson, Sheryl 


x 


6 


Locke Judith E 


x 


6 


Markarian, Joseph 


x 


6 


Merkle Cvnthia 

1 V 1 I l\|V i \— r W 1 III || 


x 


6 


Niarelli Euaene 

ill VJ ' v 1 1 1 . I— >— < \J \^ 1 1 1 — - 


x 


6 


O'Harp Man/ Michapl 

— ' i i u ■ w , i v i *— * i y i v 1 1 wi i u w i 


x 


6 


Paster Marc 

1 UO vv/ I ^ I V I Ul \_/ 


x 


6 


Paster Ruth 


x 


6 


Pelletier Maria 

1 1 — - 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 , 1 V 1 LAI 1 LA 


x 


6 


Pitman Martha 

1 1 VI 1 1 \-4 1 Ij 1 V 1 LA 1 VII LA 


x 


6 


Polison Sharon 

I ' 1 liJW I') >— » 1 1 LAI ' 1 1 


x 


6 


Rotner PhiliD 


x 


6 


Rvan Daniel H 

1 IV LA II. »*' 1 ■ " 1 1 ■ • 


x 


6 


Sackett Shellv A 


x 


6 


Schult7 Jim 

' 1 ■ LA 1 l*_ J w 1 I 1 I 


o 


6 


Seliaman Fdward 

V*? ■ 1 1 V-4 III LA II) L_ VA TV Ul Vj 


x 


6 


Shulkin Catherine 

N — 1 I 1 *— < 1 l\l 1 1 j * — ' VI \\~/ III 1 


x 


6 


Shulkin Randall S 

■» I 1 LA IIXll 1 j 1 1 LA 1 |Val l-A 1 1 VaS . 


x 


6 


Shutzer Carole B 

V— / 1 1 LJ I L— 1 j \/U 1 V»T 1 > — ' La/ ■ 


x 


6 


Shutzer Kenneth B 

' ' I I ■ 1 * Va^ 1 | 1 \ | | | | VII I > . 


x 


6 


Sims Rohhvp 1 nu 


x 


6 


Vallp Michplp M 

V 1-4 1 1 V.S j 1 V 1 IV 1 1 V_r 1 VI i 


x 


6 


Walsh Kerin T 

V V UIOI 1 , 1 \ CI II 1 1 . 


x 


6 


Watson Rrian T 

V V UIOUI 1, VJ 1 lUl 1 1 . 


x 


6 


Wpavpr Waltpr 

V VOUVCI , V V U UC 1 


x 


6 


Witt Shprrip 1 vnn 

v v 111. \j \ \\z,\ \ \ i y i 1 1 i 


x 


6 


Yaeger, Dan 


X 


6 


Yaeger, Lisa L. 


X 


6 


Yellin, Benjamin 


X 



27 



CLERK OF SWAMPSCOTT 
JACK L. PASTER 



OFFICIAL TOWN STATISTICS - 7/1/2002 TO 6/30/2003 

Marriage Intentions Filed / Marriage Licenses Issued: 73 
Marriages Recorded: 73 
Births Recorded: ( 77, females; 78, males) 
Deaths Recorded: (111, females; 71 , males) 

Applications for Variances and Special Permits processed: 54 

Oath of Office Administered to Town Officials: 200 

Massachusetts wetlands Protect Act/ 

Commission Commission filings processed: 

Conflict of Interest Statements recorded/processed: 9 

Resignations of Town Officials accepted and processed: 9 

Applications for Planning Board action processed: 5 

Site Plan Review Applications processed: 35 

Earth Removal Applications processed: 1 

Public Meeting Notices recorded and posted: 853 

Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Filings processed: 

Certificates of Business (DBA) issued and processed: 107 

Gas Storage (Flammables) Renewal Permits issued: 16 

Raffle/Bazaar Permits issued: 

Dog Licenses issued: 1,232 

NOTE: 

By vote of Town Meeting, the annual report of all municipal departments now 
covers the fiscal year, July 1 to June 30. Since many local, state and federal 
agencies require statistics for birth, death and marriage to be on a calendar 
year basis, January 1 to December 31 , we herewith present the last three calendar 
years to maintain the historical integrity and usefulness of this report: 

2000 - Births, 176; deaths, 193; marriages 56. 

2001 - Births, 139; deaths, 90; marriages 58. 

2002 - Births, 155; deaths, 182; marriages 73. 



28 



TOWN WARRANT 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2003 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 

Precinct Four 

Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 
Clarke School 
First Church in Swampscott 

Congregational 
First Church in Swampscott 

Congregational 
Swampscott High School 
Swampscott High School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 

Monument Avenue 

Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-ninth day of April, 2003, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 



To choose a Moderator for one (1 ) 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 



year 

Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

School Committee for three (3) years 

Board of Health for three (3) years 

Planning Board for five (5) years 

Planning Board for one (1) year 

Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

Housing Authority for five (5) years 



To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting members in each of the six (6) Precincts for three (3) years 
To choose one (1 ) Town Meeting member in precinct five for a one (1 ) year term 



For the results of the 2003 Town Election, see the report of the Election Commission. 



2003 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Returns of Service: 

Pursuant to the within warrants to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town of 
Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, by posting attested copies thereof at the 
Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at least two public and conspicuous places in each 
precinct in the town and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said 
postings were done on May 5, 2003 and not less than seven days before the date appointed for said 
meetings. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 



29 



Mailing of Warrants: 



The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to Town Meeting Representatives on 
5/8/2003. Copies of the Warrant were available, free of charge, for any interested person at the Town 
Administration Building. 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The Annual Town Meeting of 2003 will convene on Tuesday, April 29, 2003, with Article 1 (the 
Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m., the Town Meeting will be 
adjourned until Monday, May 19, 2003, 7:15 p.m., in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School 
on Greenwood Avenue. 



NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, MAY 19, 2003, 7:15 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 19, 2003, beginning 
at 7:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

MEETING CERTIFICATIONS 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town Meeting of April 
29, 2003 the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of May 19, 2003 was held at the Swampscott Middle 
School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:22 pm with the necessary 
quorum being present (214). At 10:25 pm it was voted to adjourn to Tuesday, May 20, 2003. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 19, 2003, the Adjourned Town 
Meeting of May 20, 2003 was held at the Swampscott Middle School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue 
and was called to order at 7:24 pm with the necessary quorum being present (187). At 10:25 pm it was 
voted to adjourn the Town Meeting to Wednesday, May 21 , 2003. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 20, 2003, the Adjourned Town 
Meeting of May 21 , 2003 was held at the Swampscott Middle School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue 
and was called to order at 7:28 pm with the necessary quorum being present (174). 

At 9:58 pm it was voted to dissolve the 2003 Annual Town Meeting. 



ATTENDANCE 

For the 2003 Town Meting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this report. 



30 



TOWN MEETING ACTION 



The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster who then administered the Oath 
of Office to the Town Meeting members. 

Reverend Dean Pederson, spiritual leader of the First Church in Swampscott, Congregational, 
offered the invocation. 

The curtain to the auditorium stage then opened and a nine-member Color Guard, organized by 
Swampscott Veterans' Service Officer Agent H. James Schultz, presented the United States and 
military service flags. The National Anthem was played and Town Meeting members joined those on 
stage to recite the Pledge of Allegiance led by Reverend Pederson. Members of the Color Guard unit 
included John Stinson, Joe Croteau and John Sacherski of the Marine Corps League; John DiPietro, 
Dave Gustavsen and Nunzio Morretti of the American Legion Post 57; and Paul Hodgen and George 
Fitzhenry of the VFW Post 1240. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman presented Distinguished Citizen Awards to Warren C. Sawyer 
and to Reverend Dean Pederson for their many contributions to the town and its residents. The 
recipients received a standing ovation from the members. 

Town Meeting members recognized Finance Committee member Mary Marrs who has received 
the coveted Rotary Club Paul Harris Award. 



ACTION UNDER THE ARTICLES 



ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 2. That the following reports be accepted: 

Town Administrator Andrew Maylor - a report on the financial matters of the town. 

Mary DiChillo, chairman of the School Committee - a report on the School Department. 

William DiMento, chairman of the Recreational Trail Study Committee - a report on the 
committee's efforts and findings. MOTION: That a recommendation be made to the Selectmen that 
the committee, having now finished its assignment, be disbanded. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman - a report on the Swampscott 150 th Celebration 
including a financial accounting which shows a surplus of $14,930 after all expenses. MOTION: That 
the Moderator be authorized to select a committee to plan a celebration marking the 375 th 
anniversary of the settling of the Town of Swampscott. 

Joseph Markarian, chairman of the School Building Committee - a report on the efforts 
to plan and construct a new high school at Jackson Park on Essex Street. 



Majority Votes. 
5/19/2003 



31 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances as shown on the 

books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2002, to the Surplus Revenue Accounts, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Voted Article 3. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority vote. 
5/19/2003 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account of 

the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be used and applied by the Board of 
Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Voted Article 4. That the sum of $793,000 be transferred as specified in the article. 
Majority Vote. 5/21/2003 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various Town accounts which 

have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a deficit, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Voted Article 5. That the sum of $25,000 be transferred from the Rubbish and Recyclables line item for 
FY 2003 to the Finance Committee's Reserve Fund. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or 

otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



No. Purpose Amount 



School Department 

04-01 Fire Alarm Upgrade at High School $100,000 

04-02 Extraordinary Textbook Replacement Program $80,000 

04-03 Elec, Plum., and Heating Service Repairs $100,000 

04-04 Instructional Technology $125,000 

04-05 Windows at Clarke and Stanley - Phase 2 $1 00,000 

04-06 Install Univents Machon, Stanley & Hadley $100,000 

Department of Public Works 

04-07 Replace Water Meters $2,000,000 

04-08 Paving (Chapter 90) $210,000 

04-09 Improve Water System $560,000 

04-1 Equipment - Sidewalk Plow $70,000 



32 



04-11 Equipment - Perpetual Care $30,000 

04-12 Improve Drainage System at Public Buildings $150,000 

04-13 Playground and Open Space Improvements $50,000 

04-14 Public Buildings Maintenance $35,000 

04-15 Heating and Electrical Upgrade - Town Hall $170,000 

Police Department 
04-16 Additions and Renovations to Police and Fire $554,000 
Stations 
Fire Department 

04-17 Vehicle $35,000 

Recreation Department 
04-18 Renovations to Field House $50,000 

Emergency Management Agency 
04-19 Emergency Management Communication and $35,000 
other Emergency Operation Center 

TOTAL $4,554,000 

Note: $2,800,000 of total will be supported by other sources (SEE BELOW). 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent 
only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 



Voted Article 6. That the Town appropriate the sum of $4,554,000 for the purposes specified in this 
Article; further that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under the appropriate section of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine the borrowing with any 
other borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/19/2003 



Notes: 

The actual bond amount for this Article will be $3,754,000. 

$800,000 of the projects will be funded through Available Funds: $210,000 - Chapter 90 Grant; 
$560,000 - MWRA loan; $30,000 - Cemetery Perpetual Care. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or 

otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

No. . Purpose Requested Recommended 



School Department 

04-20 Roof, Vent, Gutter Replacement $250,000 

04-21 Bituminous Repairs to School Parking Lots $100,000 

04-22 Waterproof and Repoint Brick $175,000 

04-23 Intercom Replacement at All Schools $100,000 

04-24 Asbestos Tile Removal and Floor $100,000 
Replacement 



33 



04-25 Furniture 

04-26 Exterior/Interior Finish Upgrades 
04-27 Science Lab Conversion - H.S. 
04-28 Stair and Glass Block Repair - Hadley 
04-29 Bleacher/Gym Repairs - middle School 
04-30 Stanley Cupola 
04-31 New Boiler Middle School 



$100,000 
$100,000 
$100,000 
$100,000 
$100,000 
$150,000 
$400,000 













Department of Public Works 
04-32 Improve Drainage on Prospect Street 



$250,000 







Recreation Department 
04-33 Field and Court Improvement 



$30,000 







$2,055,000 







Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent 
only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Voted Article 6. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Council on Aging 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the deposit of receipts 
collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to expend funds not to 
exceed $20,000 for fiscal year 2004 from said account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This would 
be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the Town on the total receipts and 
expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 8. That this article be approved. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Recycling - Blue 

Bins Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Health Department and used for the deposit of 
receipts collected through the sale of recycling bins; and further to allow the Health Department to 
expend funds not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2004 from said account for ongoing supplies and 
equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Health Department to the Town 
on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 9. That this article be approved. 



34 



Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary Plan of 

the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not covered by collective bargaining 
agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, as recommended by the 
Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 



Voted Article 10. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws, including the 

Position and Salary Classification Plans, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 



Voted Article 1 1 . That this article be approved. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 

NOTE: The effect of this article is that the town has adopted a new and amended set of Personnel 
Board By-Laws to replace the By-Laws as originally adopted in 1981 . 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws so as to 

reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 



Voted Article 12. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing or 

otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements between the Board of Selectmen and the 
various unions under the Board of Selectmen, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 13. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Majority Vote. 



35 



5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing 

otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements between the School Department 
personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, school administrators, 
custodians, cafeteria workers, clerical and non union employees, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 



Voted Article 1 3. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 1 5. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal Year 2004 budge 

and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of the Town's 
Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper expenses for the 
year, or take any action relative thereto. 



Voted Article 1 5. That the Town approve this Article and that the following amounts of money be 
appropriated for the several purposes hereinafter itemized. Each numbered item is to be considered i 
separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent only for the stated purpose. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



36 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2004 OPERATING BUDGET and 2003 TM ARTICLES REPORT 





Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


From: 


From: 






Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


Enterprise 


Bonding 


4 

5' 


Selectmen - Expenses 


$ 10,350 


$ 10.350 








Town Administrator - Salaries 


$ 157,736 


$ 157.736 








6i Expenses 


$ 2,000 


$ 2.000 








7 
8 


Law Dept. - Town Counsel Contract Expense 


$ 55,000 


$ 55,000 








Parking Ticket Clerk - Supplies 


$ 7,500 


$ 7,500 








9 


Workers' Compensation - Expenses, 


$ 290,000 


$ 290,000 










Benefits and Insurance 















Accounting Department - Salaries 


$ 114,098 


$ 114,098 








1 


Uncompensated Balances 


$ 146,000 


$ 146,000 








12 


Expenses 


$ 35,000 


$ 35,000 








13 


Technology Dept. - Computer Analyst 


$ 40,000 


$ 40,000 








4 


Expenses 


$ 96.190 


$ 96,190 








5 


Treasurer - Salaries 


$ 92.410 


$ 92,410 








16 


Expenses 


$ 7,200 


$ 7,200 








i7 


Town Clerk - Collector - Salaries 


$ 132,291 


$ 132,291 








18 


Town Postage Account (for all depts.) 


$ 36,000 


$ 36,000 








I9 


Expenses 


$ 12,300 


$ 12,300 








>0 


Election Commission - Salaries 


$ 41 ,440 


$ 41,440 








21 


Expenses 


$ 11.618 


$ 11,618 








12 


Asessors - Salaries 


$ 135,706 


$ 135,706 








>3 


Expenses 


$ 10,200 


$ 10,200 








>4 


Outside Services 


$ 10,000 


$ 10,000 








>5 


Zoning Board of Appeals - Secretary 


$ 2,985 


$ 2.985 








>6 


Expenses 


$ 4,100 


$ 4,100 








18 


Planning Board - Expenses 


$ 500 


$ 500 








>9 


Contributory Retirement - Pension Cont. 


$ 1,998,870 


$ 1,998,870 








JO 


Non-Contributory Retirement - Pen. Contrib. 


$ 228,000 


$ 228,000 








31 


Police - Salaries 


$ 2,406,478 


$ 2,406,478 








32 


Expenses 


$ 124,900 


$ 124,900 








!A 


Police Vehicles 


$ 29,000 


$ 29,000 








33 


Animal Control Officer - Salary 


$ 10,000 


$ 10,000 








34 


Expenses 


$ 1 ,500 


$ 1 ,500 








35 


Boarding Animals / Pound Supplies 


$ 1 ,500 


$ 1 ,500 








36 


Fire - Salaries 


$ 2,202,029 


$ 2,202,029 








37 


Expenses 


$ 78.000 


$ 78,000 








38 


Protective Clothing 


$ 23,000 


$ 23,000 








39 


Lynn Dispatch / Mutual Aid 


$ 60,500 


$ 60,500 








40 


Training 


$ 30,000 


$ 30,000 








41 

42 


Harbormaster - Salary 


$ 6,764 


$ 6,764 








Expenses 


$ 2,500 


$ 2,500 








43 


Emergency Management - Director 


$ 1,384 


$ 1,384 








44 


Expenses 


$ 3,300 


$ 3,300 








45 


Sealer of Weights and Measures - Salary 


$ 6,150 


$ 6,150 








46 


Expenses 


$ 535 


$ 535 








47 
48 


Constable - Salary 


$ 100 


$ 100 








Building/Plumbing/Gas Inspector - Salaries 


$ 142,473 


$ 142,473 








49 

50 


Expenses 


$ 1 1 ,960 


$ 1 1 ,960 








Conservation Commission - Expenses 


$ 800 


$ 800 








51 


Insurance-Group Health/Property/Casualty 


$ 3,000,000 


$ 3,000.000 








52 


Health Department - Salaries 


$ 119,955 


$ 119.955 








53 


Expenses 


$ 4,000 


$ 4.000 








54 


Inspections and Tests 


$ 6,500 


$ 6.500 








55 1 Tests/State Charges 


$ 7,500 


$ 7.500 





37 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2004 OPERATING BUDGET and 2003 TM ARTICLES REPORT 



Line 


Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Enterprise 


Frorr 




Item 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


Fund 


Bone 




56 


Rubbish and Recyclables Collections 


$ 


800,000 


$ 


800,000 










57 


Public Works - General Salaries 


$ 


552,612 


$ 


552,612 










58 


General Expenses 


$ 


141,200 


$ 


141,200 










59 


Snow and Ice 


$ 


75,000 


$ 


75,000 










60 


Highway Maintenance (Includes $ for 


$ 


50,000 


$ 


50,000 












Ch. 497 wk and repairs to private roads) 












61 


Sewer Salaries 


$ 


256,967 






$ 


256,967 






62 


Sewer Expenses 


$ 


100,600 






$ 


100,600 






63 


Lynn Sewer 


$ 


900,000 






$ 


900,000 






64 


Water System Improvements 


$ 


50,000 






$ 


50,000 






65 


Indirect Costs 


$ 


152,825 






$ 


152,825 




66 


Administration 


$ 


15,144 






$ 


15,144 






67 


Pension 


$ 


42,723 






$ 


42,723 






68 


Principal 


$ 


138,604 






$ 


138,604 






69 


Interest 


$ 


34,773 






$ 


34,773 






70 


Water Salaries 


$ 


260,401 






$ 


260,401 







71 


Water Expenses 


$ 


68,595 






$ 


68,595 







72 


MWRA Water 


$ 


1,500,000 






$ 


1,500,000 






73 


Water Improvements 


$ 


75,000 






$ 


75,000 







74 


Indirect Costs 


$ 


152,825 






$ 


152,825 




| 


75 


Pension 


$ 


44,838 






$ 


44,838 







76 


Principal 


$ 


250,597 






$ 


250,597 






77 


Interest 


$ 


29,438 






$ 


29,438 







78 


Cemetery Salaries 


$ 


188,892 


$ 


188,892 










79 


Cemetery Expenses 


$ 


14,000 


$ 


14,000 










80 


DPW Special Accounts 


$ 


147,500 


$ 


147,500 










81 


Recreation Commission - Salaries 


$ 


67,278 


$ 


67,278 










82 


Expenses 


$ 


11,620 


$ 


11,620 










83 


Council on Aging - Salaries 


$ 


56,400 


$ 


56,400 










84 


Part-time position with no benefits 


$ 


11,500 


$ 


11,500 










85 


Expenses 


$ 


28,000 


$ 


28,000 











86 


Veterans' Services - Director's Salary 


$ 


9,215 


$ 


9,215 










87 


Expenses 


$ 


2,300 


$ 


2,300 










88 


Assistance 


$ 


7,500 


$ 


7,500 










89 


Debt - Municipal 


$ 


1,763,140 


$ 


1,763,140 










90 


Debt - Water/Sewer 


$ 


1,083,644 


$ 


1,083,644 










91 


Library - Salaries 


$ 


360,404 


$ 


360,404 










92 


Expenses 


$ 


33,800 


$ 


33,800 










93 


Materials 


$ 


107,991 


$ 


107,991 










94 


Town Reports 


$ 


3,500 


$ 


3,500 










95 


Telephone Expense - most departments 


$ 


25,000 


$ 


25,000 










96 


Street Lighting 


$ 


140,000 


$ 


140,000 










97 


Reserve Fund 


$ 


160,000 


$ 


160,000 










98 


Audit 


$ 


39,000 


$ 


39,000 










99 


Historical Commission 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,000 










100 


Medicare Tax 


$ 


225,000 


$ 225,000 










102 


Ambulance Service 


$ 


138,000 


$ 


138,000 










103 


Regional Vocational School 


$ 


136,000 


$ 


136,000 










104 


School Budget 


$17,404,230 


$17,404,230 












































TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


$39,815,378 


$ 35,742,048 


$ 


$ 


4,073,330 


$ 



















38 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2004 OPERATING BUDGET and 2003 TM ARTICLES REPORT 





Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Enterprise 


From: 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


Fund 


Bonding 




Transfer to Current Revenue 


$ 793,000 




$ 793,000 








From Surplus Revenue Account 












Transfer to Reserve Fund 


$ 25,000 




$ 25,000 






From Rubbish/Recyclables Line Item 












Capital Improvement Projects - 19 projects 


$ 4,554,000 




$ 800,000 




$ 3,754,000 


$210,000 from Ch. 90 Grant; 












$560,000 from MWRA Loan; and 














$30,000 from Perpetual Care Account 












Departmental Operating Budgets 


$39,815,378 


$35,742,048 




$ 4,073,330 






Sources of funds cited on pages 1 &2 














Transfer to Current Revenue 


$ 175,000 




$ 175,000 






From Assessors' Overlay Surplus 












Transfer to offset FY 2004 budget 


$ 353,500 




$ 353,500 






From Stabilization Fund 














Transfer to offset FY 2004 budget 


$ 453,762 




$ 453,762 








From unexpended capital articles 














Street light procurement program 


$ 208,000 








$ 208,000 












































TOTAL BUDGET AND ARTICLES 


$ 46,377,640 


$ 35,742,048 


$ 2,600,262 


$ 4,073,330 


$ 3,962,000 



39 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to repair, construct 

or reconstruct streets, together with all necessary work incidental thereto, including engineering, in 
conjunction with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under General Laws, Chapter 90 or otherwise; 
and to transfer for the purpose any unexpended balance of appropriations voted for this purpose at 
prior Town Meetings. 

Sponsored by the Superintendent of Public Works 



Voted Article 16. That this article be approved. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will authorize the Chief Procurement Officer or his 

designee, pursuant to the provisions of Article IV, section 22 of the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Swampscott to rent, convey, abandon or otherwise dispose of the town owned real property identified 
on Assessors' Map 27, Block 300, Lot at a minimum of $1 .00. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 17. That this article be approved. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 1 8. To see if the Town will vote the funds appropriated under Article 6 of this 

warrant and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works be authorized to contract for 
and expend any federal, state or MWRA aid available for the project, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works to submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all applications 
deemed necessary for grants and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the 
United States under any state and/or federal programs to receive and accept such grants or 
reimbursement for this purpose, and/or any others in any way connected with the scope of this Article, 
provided that the amount of the authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of such aid 
received prior to the issuance of bonds or notes under this vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the Board of Public Works be authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this project., or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Superintendent of Public Works 



Voted Article 18. That this article be adopted. 

Majority Vote. 
5/19/2003 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the Board 

of Public Works to enter into a contract not to exceed twenty years with wireless telecommunication 
tower companies to lease antenna space on the Water Tank, Town Hall, the Paradise Road DPW 
garage and on Humphrey Street Pumping Station, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



40 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article XIII: Earth 

Removal, Section four: General Limitations, Subsection (7), related to hours of operation, to read as 
follows: 

Hours of Operation for all Quarries within the Town Limits: 

A. Crushing. All crushing operations shall be conducted between the hours of 7:00 
AM and 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. Saturday crushing hours shall be 7:30 
AM to 1 :00 PM. Associated loaders, trucks and other motor vehicles shall not 
operate in a quarry before the 7:00 AM and 7:30 AM starting times. 

B. Drilling Operations. Drilling operations shall be conducted between the hours of 
7:00 AM and 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. Saturday drilling hours shall be 
between 7:30 AM and 1:00 PM. 

C. Blasting Operations. All blasts shall be scheduled to be shot between the hours of 
10:30 AM and 2:00 PM Monday through Friday. Weather and safety 
considerations will supersede this time frame. Blasting shall be avoided on 
severely overcast days when early weather forecasts allow. 

D. Quarry Stockpiling Operations. Quarry stockpiling and moving of materials shall be 
conducted between 6:00 AM and 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. Saturday hours 
for same shall be between 7:30 AM and 1 :00 PM. 

E. Customer Sales. The sale of materials and loading of trucks that exit quarries shall 
be between the hours of 6:00 AM and 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. Saturday 
hours for sales shall be between 7:30 AM and 1 :00 PM. Saturday hours for trucks 
picking up product shall be 7:30 AM to 1 :00 PM. Trucks will not enter quarries prior 
to 6:00 AM on weekdays or 7:30 AM on Saturdays. 

F. Bituminous Production. Should bituminous production be part of a quarries 
activities, it shall operate 24hrs./day, 7 days/week, to the extent permitted by 
Massachusetts's law. 

G. Concrete Production. Should concrete production be part of a quarries activities, it 
shall operate 24hrs./day, 7 days/week, to the extent permitted by Massachusetts's 
law. 

H. All other types of production shall occur between 7:00 AM and 5:00 PM Monday 
through Friday and 7:30 AM and 1 :00 PM on Saturdays. 

I. Cleanup and maintenance. Cleanup and maintenance activities shall be 
conducted between the startup times and 6:00 PM Monday through Friday and 
1 :00 PM on Saturdays. 

J. Sunday and Holiday Hours. Except for the provisions provided in sections F and 
G, operations on Sundays and the following legal holidays are not allowed: New 
Year's Day, Martin Luther King Day, President's Day, Patriot's Day, Memorial Day, 
Fourth of July, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veteran's Day, Thanksgiving and 
Christmas. 

K. Only in the event of an emergency that threatens life or property shall activity be 
allowed to be conducted outside of these hours. 
Sponsored by Smilia Marvosh, et al. 

Voted Article 20. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



41 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will transfer $175,000 from the Assessor's Overlay Surplus 

Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue to be used and applied by the Board of 
Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 21 . That this article be approved. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/03 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will authorize the transfer of $353,500 from the Stabilization 

Fund to offset various Fiscal 2004 Town budgets. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 22. That this article be approved. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $453,762 from various unexpended 

capital articles to offset various Fiscal 2004 Town budgets. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 23. That this article be approved. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to adopt Chapter 242, of the Acts of 2000 as 

codified in M.G.L. c.31, 58A which reads as follows: 

"Not withstanding the provisions of any general or special law to the contrary, 
in any city, town or district that accepts this section, no person shall be eligible to have his name 
certified for original appointment to the position of firefighter or police officer if such person has reached 
his thirty-second birthday on the date of the entrance examination. Any veteran shall be allowed to 
exceed the maximum age provision of this section by the number of years served on active military 
duty, but in no case shall said candidate for appointment be credited more than four years of active 
military duty." Or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen, Town Administrator, Police Chief, and Fire Chief 



Voted Article 24. That the town accept the provisions of Chapter 242 of the Acts of 2000 as codified in 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 31 Section 58A. 

Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



42 



ARTICLE 25. To see of the Town will vote to raise and/or appropriate and or appropriate 

from available funds, the funds necessary to procure and install trees on the public ways immediately 
adjacent to the Jackson Park area. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 25. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the Town 

Administrator to lease a portion of Phillips Park to a nonprofit for a term of twenty (20) years for the 
purpose of constructing and operating and Ice Rink/Community Center at Phillips Park and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General Court to authorize the lease of a portion 
of Phillips Park for the purposes stated herein pursuant to the provisions of Article 97 of the 
Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or take action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 26. That the town authorize the Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator to lease 
a portion of land consisting of 47,061 square feet adjacent to and part of Phillips Park identified as the 
"Lease Area" drawn on a plan entitled Lease Plan, Swampscott, Massachusetts, prepared for the Town 
of Swampscott, dated April 5, 2003; and said plan drawn by Parsons and Faia, Inc., 60 Lewis Street, 
Lynn, Massachusetts to a non-profit corporation as contemplated by MGL Chapter 40A, Section 3, to 
be formed for a term of twenty (20) years for the purpose of constructing and operating an Ice 
Rink/Community Center at Phillips Park and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
Massachusetts General Court to authorize the lease of a portion of Phillips Park for the purpose stated 
herein pursuant to the provisions of Article 97, Chapter 45, and any other state provisions relevant to 
the subject intended use of the land. 

The approval of Town Meeting is subject to the following conditions: 

1 . Establishment of a five member "Phillips Park Acre Lease Committee" consisting of: one member 
as designated by the Town Moderator, one member of the Finance Committee or their selected 
designee, one member of the Board of Selectmen or their selected designee, one member of the 
Recreation Commission or their selected designee, and the Town Administrator or his selected 
designee, for the purpose of holding a public meeting or meetings and development of all 
documents pertaining to, but not limited to, a proposed lease and conditions for construction of the 
facility and conditions for the Request for Proposals. 

2. Full financial review and approval by the Finance Committee prior to the award of the successful 
bidder on the RFP and approval of all required financial documents to be part of the RFP process. 

3. Approval of all documents by Town Counsel. 

4. All approvals in regard to zoning, environmental, and by-law issues shall be obtained prior to the 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator executing said lease. 

5. All money for construction and initial infrastructure be raised by the next annual Town Meeting. 



Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



43 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $208,000, by borrowing or 

otherwise, for the purpose of procuring the town's streetlights from Massachusetts Electric. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



Voted Article 27. That the Town appropriate the sum of $208,000 for the purpose specified in this 
Article; further that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under the appropriate section of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine the borrowing with any 
other borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept, upon its passage into law by the 

Legislature and having been signed by the Governor, the Early Retirement Incentive Program as 
provided for under Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 28. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws for the purpose of 

preserving and protecting significant buildings within the Town by instructing the Building Inspector to 
inform the Swampscott Historical Commission of any request for a demolition permit of a structure 
which is in whole or in part seventy five years or more old. The Historical Commission, through study, 
research and discussion, determines if the building reflects the architectural, cultural, economic, political 
or social history of the town. If the Historical Commission determines that the building is "preferably 
preserved", a delay of twelve months is imposed. Specific procedures for the implementation of this 
by-law to be established by the Building Inspector. 

Sponsored by the Swampscott Historical Commission 



Voted Article 29. That the subject matter of this article be referred back to the Historical Commission for 
further study. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Replace existing section 2.2.7.5 with the following: 

2.2.7.5. Catastrophe, Demolition or Condemnation. Any nonconforming structure may be reconstructed 
after a fire, explosion or other catastrophe, or after demolition or condemnation, provided that such 
reconstruction is commenced within twelve months after such catastrophe, demolition or condemnation, 
whichever occurs first, and provided that the building(s) as reconstructed shall be on the same footprint 
and only as great in volume and gross floor area as the original nonconforming structure unless a 



44 



different footprint or larger volume or gross floor area is authorized by special permit from the Board of 
Appeals, and further provided that reconstruction is approved by the Planning Board pursuant to 
5.4.0.0. Such time for reconstruction may be extended by special permit from the Board of Appeals for 
good cause. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 



)ted Article 30. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the article. 

lanimous Vote. 
20/2003 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Replace existing section 5.4.3.0 with the following: 

5.4.3.0. Procedures. Applicants for site plan approval shall submit five (5) copies of the site plan to the 
Planning Board for review, two (2) copies of the site plan review materials with the application to the 
Town Clerk, and within three (3) days thereafter shall also submit a copy of the site plan materials to 
the Board of Health, Board of Appeals, Building Inspector, Town Engineer, Fire Department and 
Conservation Commission for their advisory review and comments. The Planning Board shall review 
the site plan and approve it, or approve it with conditions as deemed appropriate, or disapprove it if it 
finds that the application including the site plan review materials is incomplete. Conditions included in a 
site plan review approval may include reference(s) to the requirements of zoning compliance set forth 
elsewhere in the Swampscott Zoning By-Law. The Planning Board shall act upon the site plan within 
sixty (60) days of its receipt, and notify the applicant of its decision. The decision of the Planning Board 
shall be upon a majority of those present and shall be in writing. No building permit or certificate of 
occupancy shall be issued by the Building Inspector without the written approval of the site plan by the 
Planning Board, unless sixty (60) days lapse from the date of the submittal of the site plan without 
action by the Planning Board. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 



Voted Article 31 . That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to take the following action: 

Amend the zoning by-laws by deleting the text of Section 3.4.1 .0 and replacing it with the words 
"Repealed - number is reserved for future use" and further direct the moderator to appoint a 
Environmental Disturbance By-Law Review Committee to study a new method to regulate 
environmental disturbances and report back at the next town meeting or special town meeting and that 
such committee be comprised of the chief of police or designee, the building inspector, the health 
officer, the town administrator or designee, citizens with expertise in environmental issues (noise, light, 
air, etc.), if possible, and any other persons the moderator deems appropriate and that such committee 
remain until disbanded by act of town meeting. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 

Voted Article 32. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/20/2003 



45 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows 

Replace the existing definition of "building coverage" in Article VI with the following: 
Building coverage: That percentage of the lot area covered by the total square feet of the footprint of the 
building or buildings located thereon. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 



Voted Article 33. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows 

Replace the existing figure referenced in the definition of "building height" in Article IV with the following: 

See Figure 1(a), 1(b) & 1(c) in Appendix B. 

Further, replace the page in the existing By-Law labeled, "Figure 1 ," with three new pages labeled 
Figures 1(a), 1(b) & 1(c) that are attached. 

Further, revise the existing definition of "story" in Article VI by adding the following sentence: A half-story 
is a story which is compromised of 50% or less of the square footage of the floor below. 
Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 

Voted Article 34. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows 

Replace the existing definition of "gross floor area" and add a definition for "attic" in Article VI with the 
following: 

Gross floor area: The total square feet of floor space within the outside dimensions of a building 
including each floor level, without deduction for hallways, stairs, closets, thickness of walls, columns, or 
other features, including floor area of attic containing seven feet, three inches (7'3") or greater in height 
as measured perpendicular to the floor, but excluding basement/cellars if more than 50% of the height of 
the basement/cellar is below the average finished grade of the ground adjoining the basement/cellar. 

Attic: The apace between the ceiling beams of the top story and roof rafters. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 

Voted Article 35. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



46 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows 

Replace the existing definition of "lot, frontage or" in Article VI with the following: 

Lot, frontage of: A lot line coinciding with the sideline of a street, said line to be measured continuously 
along a single street or along two (2) intersecting streets if their angle of intersection is greater than one 
hundred and twenty (120) degrees. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 

Voted Article 36. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to take the following action: 

That the Town Administrator be directed to appoint a Map Committee to study the Town's zoning, street 
map, wetland map, and such other maps as the committee deems necessary, seek state assistance, 
grants or other funding to update maps as necessary, and report back at the next town meeting or 
special town meeting, and thereafter, with progress reports and that such committee be comprised of a 
member of the planning board, the conservation commission, the zoning board of appeals, the town 
engineer or designee, the town administrator or designee, citizens with expertise in cartography, if 
possible, and any other persons the town administrator deems appropriate and that such committee 
remain until disbanded by act of town meeting. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 



Voted Article 37. That this article be adopted. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Replace the existing definition of "gross floor area" in Article IV with the following: Gross floor area: 
For clarification in calculations add: "excluding basement and cellars" 
Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 38. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Replace the existing definition of "lot, frontage of in Article IV with the following: 

To simplify and correct a drafting and editing error replace the existing definition with the following: 

A lot line coinciding with the sideline of a street which provides both legal rights of vehicular access and 

physical vehicular access to the lot, said line to be measured continuously along a single street or along 

two (2) intersecting streets. See Figure 2 in Appendix B. 



47 



Sponsored by the Planning Board 
Voted Article 39. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Amend Section 2.3.3.0. by adding a new Section, 2.3.3.4 to add clarity to Town policies regarding 
fences as follows: 2.3.3.4 Fences not more than six feet in height are permitted accessory structures in 
all districts. Fences greater in height than six fee may be erected on a lot in any district pursuant to a 
special permit issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals in accordance with Section 5.3.0.0. 
Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 40. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Amend Section 2.2.7. 3.a. by add the following language at the end of the section: "and further provided 
that if the set-back(s) of the proposed addition from any property line is less than the minimum 
permitted by zoning, that site plan approval shall be obtained from the Planning Board pursuant to 
Section 5.4.0.0. for any addition, including additions of less than 501 square feet of gross floor area, 
and said approval may include a condition that the set-back (s) of the addition comply with zoning 
dimensional requirements;" 

Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 41 . That the subject matter of this article be referred back to the Planning Board for furthe 
study. 

Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Amend Section 3.4.1 .0. deleting Section 3.4.1 .0. Disturbances, and replace it with the following 
language "Section 3.4.1 .0. Noise Disturbances. The maximum permissible sound pressure level at the 
closest residential lot line shall not exceed 69 decibels between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. 
and 61 decibels between 7:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. as measured on a frequency band of 125 cycles per 
second using a general purpose sound level meter complying with the provisions of the American 
National Standards Institute, properly calibrated and operated on the "A" weighted network. This 
regulation shall not apply to: 

Transient noises of moving vehicles 

Noises of safety signals, warning devices, and pressure relief valves. 
Noises emanating from temporary construction and maintenance activities 
between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m." 
Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 42. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/20/2003 



48 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Amend Sections 4.1.0.0. and 4.2.0.0. replacing the word "Wetlands" with "Wetland" or take any action 

relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Voted Article 43. That the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws and Zoning Map of 

The Town of Swampscott 1985 by adding new streets and subdivision lots, and by deleting the map 
notation "FLOOD PLAIN/WETLAND PROTECTION DISTRICT OVERLAY ZONE EL 16", and by adding 
a new notation to the map as follows: REFER TO FLOOD PLAIN/WETLAND PROTECTION DISTRICT 
MAP OF THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT APRIL 1 , 1 976, AS REVISED, FOR DELINEATION OF THE 
FLOOD/PLAIN WETLAND PROTECTION OVERLAY DISTRICT", and by changing the map date to 
2003. 

Sponsored by the Planning Board 
Voted Article 44. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to create a By-Law which would make it illegal to 

perform car dissections in town and impose a fine of $75 for each infraction. 
Sponsored by Alice Jane Winston, et al. 

Voted Article 45. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to establish a 

seven member Rail Trail Implementation Committee for the purpose of creating a recreational trail 
along the former railroad corridor, now owned by the National Grid Power Company. The Committee 
will work with the Town Administrator for purposes to include, but not limited to, negotiating land use, 
fund raising, trail design and construction and coordinating with relevant town departments. The seven 
member implementation committee will be comprised of interested residents and will supplemented 
with liaisons/advisors from the Conservation Commission, Recreation Commission, Department of 
Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department, Community Development Committee, Rail Study 
Committee and Trail Neighbors. 

Sponsored by Ron Talkov, et al. 

Voted Article 46. That this article be approved. 

Majority Vote. 



49 



5/21/03 



ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will rescind a revolving account established under the 

provisions of MGL Chapter 71 , section 71 F originally established by Article 48 of the spring 1995 Town 
Meeting for the purpose of receiving and spending, without further appropriation, funds received by 
non-resident students. 

Sponsored by the Finance Committee 

Voted Article 47. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 48. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salaries of elected 

Town Officials for the ensuing year. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 48. That the town set the salary of the elected Constable at $100 per year for Fiscal Year 
2004. 



Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II, Section 2 of the Town Bylaws 

by inserting at the end of the first sentence of the second paragraph, the following, "; provided, 
however, that the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting shall be mailed to each town meeting member 
not less than seven days prior to the date set for the business portion of the representative town 
meeting." 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 49. That the General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott be amended as specified in the 
article. 



Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or otherwise, 

under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by borrowing or otherwise, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for any and ail of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing 
articles. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 50. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
5/21/2003 



50 



Swampscott Town Meeting Members 



're 


Name 


May 19 May 20 


May 21 




Alpert, Julius H. 













Baldacci, Richard R. 


X 


X 


X 




Bartram - DePaolo, Amanda S. 


X 










Bartram, Glenn D. 


X 










Batchelder, Kathleen 


X 


X 


X 




Bates, Wallace T. 


X 


X 


X 




Bickford, Barbara 


X 


X 


X 




Birchmore, Sally 


o 










Bitman, Bernard 


X 


X 







Blonder, Cindy M. 


X 


X 


o 




Blonder, Jeffrey S. 


X 


X 







Brenner, Lawrence 


X 





X 




Buchanan, Susan 


X 


o 


X 




Caron, Mark 


X 


X 


X 




Chouinard, Conrad L. 


X 


X 


X 




Chouinard, Madeline 


X 


X 


X 




Cresta, Gino A. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 




Cropley, John H. Jr. 


X 


X 


o 




Dandreo, Robert 


X 


X 


X 




Feinberg, Helen 1. 


X 


X 


o 




Finlay, Patricia 


X 


X 


X 




Genest, Lee Bartlett 


X 


X 







Harrington, Vera C. 


o 


o 







Healey, Mary Doherty 


X 


X 







Healey, Thomas J. Ill 


X 


X 


X 




Hyde, Sally A. 


X 


X 


X 




Hyde, William R. 


X 


X 


X 




Jaeger, Robert C. 













Johnson, Maryalice 


X 


X 







Kaloust, Gerald J. 


X 


X 


o 




Kaloust, Roberta A. 


X 


X 







Kearney, Sheila 


o 


X 


X 




Kessler, Nelson 


X 


X 


X 




Legere, Arthur J. 


X 


X 







Lombard, James G. 


X 


X 


X 




Maher, William M. 


X 


X 


o 




Maitland, J. Richard 


o 


o 


o 




Maitland, Susan 


X 


X 


X 




Marrs, Mary Regan 


X 


X 


X 


1 Montague, Neil 


X 


X 







Niram, Gadi R. 


X 


X 


o 




Patrikis, Theodore A. 


X 


X 







Perry, Robert E. 








o 




Perry, Stefanie 


o 


o 







PicarieJIo, John A. 


X 


X 


X 




Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


X 


X 




Ralph, Jennifer 


X 


X 







Rizzo, John F. 


X 


X 


o 




Shannon, Cynthia 


X 


X 


X 




Shapiro, Barbara R. 


X 


X 


o 




Shiloh, Naomi R. 


X 


X 


X 




Speranza, Frances M. 


X 


X 


o 




Speranza-Hartmann, Marianne 


X 


X 


o 




Whittier, Douglas 




X X 



51 



Swampscott Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 


May 19 


May 20 


May 21 


2 


Bacik, Lisa A. Carrigan 


X 


X 





2 


Barden, Eugene 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Best, Mary A. 


X 


O 


o 


2 


Booras, Peter J. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Boucher, Jennifer Hunt 


o 


o 


o 


2 


Bowen, David 


v/ 

X 


X 


X 


2 


Brown, Mary Lisa 


X 


X 





2 


Cameron, Janell A. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Carey, George 


X 








2 


Carey, Lisa 


X 


X 





2 


Cassidy, Timothy P. 


o 


o 





2 


Collins, Diane 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Curry, Martha 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Doherty, Daniel E. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Doherty, John J. 








X 


2 


Dunn, Judith F. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Dunn, Larry A. 


X 





X 


2 


Gambale, Charles 








o 


2 


Giosa, Kellie 


X 


X 





2 


Hebert, Donald 


X 


o 





2 


I | | t | X 

Hebert, Janet 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Hitchcock, Sarah P. 


X 


X 


o 


2 


Huber, Carol 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Huber, Richard 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Hunt, John 


X 


X 





2 


Hunt, Stephen R. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Jackson, Lorene 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Laband, Andrew 


X 


X 


X 


2 


LaConte, Louise M. 


X 





X 


2 


LaConte, Vincent A. 


X 


o 


X 


2 


Lyons, Wendy A. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Marcou, Martha L. 


X 


X 


o 


2 


McHugh, Tern 


o 


o 


o 


2 


Murphy, Brian C. 


o 








2 


Myette, Robert J. 


X 


X 





2 


Newhall, Linda A. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Newhall, Walter 


X 


X 


X 


2 


|- V II 1 ■ | 1 A 

Palleschi, Edward A. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


|— V || |_ ■ ^ 1 _ • 1 

Palleschi, Sheila 


X 


X 


o 


2 


Pitman, Michael 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Reardon, Ellen M. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Richmond, David E. 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Romano, John L. 


X 


X 


o 


2 


Rubin, Debra 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Ruggiero, John 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Ryan, Leah 


X 


X 


o 


2 


/■"n i 1 1 i i _ 

Schultz, Jackson 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Shanahan, Joseph E. Jr. 


X 








2 


Strauss, Danielle 


X 


X 





2 


Strauss, Mathew 


X 





o 


2 


Sullivan, Brian 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Taverna, Joseph 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Whelan, David 


o 


o 


o 



52 



Swampscott Town Meeting Members 



3 re 


Name May 19 May 20 May 21 


3 


Barden, Michele Cobban 


X X 


X 


3 


Bennett, Ralph E. II 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Boggs, Deborah A. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Breen, Kevin 


X 





X 


3 


Breen, Leslie A. 


X 


X 





3 


Campbell, Michael S. 


X 





X 


3 


Cardenas, Patricia 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Cassidy, John R. 











3 


Coletti, John M. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Cormier, Kathleen 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Dandreo, Daniel J. Ill 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Donaher, Karen 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Donnelly, Robert 


o 








3 


Driscoll-Fields, Anne 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Eldridge, Barbara F. 


X 





X 


3 


Gay, Donna 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Golden, Edward 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Goodwin, Jeremy 


X 





o 


3 


Hayes, Paul E. 


X 


X 





3 


Holmes, Betty Dean 


o 


X 


X 


3 


ludice, Michael A. 


X 


X 


o 


3 


Jolly, Linda J. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Jolly, Robert V. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Kelleher, Martha G. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Kenney, Stephen 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Lawlor, James C. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Ledbury, Lisa J. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Legere, Donald R. Jr. 


X 








3 


Lincoln, Loring B. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Lincoln, Maria F. 


X 


X 





3 


Luke, Gerald 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Magee, Kathleen 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Marvosh, Smilia 







X 


3 


Mcintosh, Richard T. 


o 





o 


3 1 Meister, Bunny Young 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Moltz, Sandra 


X 


X 





3 


Mulgay, Mark H. 


X 


X 


o 


3 


Patriarca, Michael 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Perry, Gerard D. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Pilotte, Denis A. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Richard, Dianne M. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Sainato, Maryann 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Sheehan, Neil G. 


X 


o 


X 


3 


Stone, James S. Sr. 


o 





o 


3 


Thomsen, Maureen 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Vogel, John M. 


X 





X 


3 


Vogel, Kristen S. 


X 





X 


3 


Weaver, David S. 


X 


X 


o 


3 


Webster, Mary 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Welch, Thomas F. 


X 


X 


X 


3 


White-DePaolo, Jan 


X 


X 


X 


3 


Wright, Suzanne 


X 


X 


X 


3 iZeman, Cynthia 


X 


X X 



53 



Swampscott Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 


JVlay 19 


May 20 


May 21 


4 


Anderson, Dana 


O 


o 


o 


4 Baker, Janet N. 


X 


o 


X 


4 


Balliro, Anita 


X 


X 


o 


4 


Balsama, Joseph J. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Barden, Marc 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Bonazzoli, Paula M. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Brown, Rachel 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Carlson, Elizabeth 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Cassidy, Francis J. Jr. 











4 


Cassidy, Marilyn T. 


X 


o 


o 


4 


Dawley, Thomas 


X 


X 


X 


4 


DeChillo, Mary H. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


DiMento, Carol A.G. 


X 


X 


o 


4 


DiMento, William R. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Donelan, Robert E. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Donnenfeld, Neil D. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Drummond, Brian J. 


o 


X 


X 


4 


Drummond, Ellen M. 





X 


X 


4 


Duffy, Pauline 


X 


X 


o 


4 


Falco, Michael 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Foley, Phyllis Serafini 





o 


o 


4 


Goldman, Iris 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Goudreau, Connie 


X 


o 





4 


Hall, David S. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Hughes, Jack 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Hughes, Nancy T. 


X 


o 


X 


4 


Johnson, Anne M. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Keeter, Terri 


X 


X 





4 


Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Leger, Jeanne 


X 


X 


X 


4 


McClung, Michael D. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


McNerney, Cynthia 


X 


X 





4 


Meninno, Christine 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Morretti, Nunzio 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Moynihan, John 


X 


X 


X 


4 


O'Brien, Laurie 


X 


X 


o 


4 


Paster, Glenn P. 


X 


X 


o 


4 


Paster, Jack L. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Phelan, John V. Ill 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Poska, Matthew P. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Powell, Amy 


X 





X 


4 


Reagan, John 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Santanello, Daniel 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Scibelli, Anthony A. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Scolamiero, Dennis M. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Shanahan, Patricia D. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Shanahan, William E. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Squires, Deborah 


o 


X 


o 


4 


Squires, John Jr. 





X 





4 


Stone, Myron S. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Vaucher, Catherine M. 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Watts, Jody 


o 


o 





4 


Weaver, Sharon 


X 


o 


o 


4 


Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 


X 


X 


X 



54 



Swampscott Town Meeting Members 



Pre Name 


May 19 May 20 


May 21 


5 Akim, Marta 





o 





5 Belhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 


X 


X 


o 


5 (Belhumeur, Thomas R. 


X 


X 


o 


5 


Bermani, Doris P. 


X 


X 





5 


Brooks, Gerald A. 


X 


X 


X 
X 


5 


Burke, Scott Douglas 


X 


X 


5 


Caplan, Edward 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Carangelo, Lisa 


o 


X 


X 


5 


Carr, Heather M. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Cerra, Anthony W. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Chapman, Randy 


X 


X 





5 


Connolly, Loretta 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Devlin, Michael K. 


X 


X 





5 


Forman, Amy 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Garner, Ronald L. 


o 


o 





5 


Goldsmith, Alice 











5 


Hennessey, Mersine 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Hennessey, William F. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Jancsy, John F. 





o 


o 


5 


Karwowski, John R. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Keller, Ellen Long 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Lawler, John 


X 


X 


X 


5 
5 


Lawler, Sami 


X 


X 


X 


Levy, Eric S. 


o 


o 





5 


Lewis, Susan E. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Lipson, Philip D. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Nellis, Veeder C. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Patkin, Randall 


X 








5 


Potash, Leola 


X 


X 







5 


Pye, Darlene 


X 


X 





5 


Reardon, Carl 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Reichert, Leslie E. 


X 


X 





5 


Rodenstein, Claudia 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Rogers, Roberta C. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Rossman, Neil 


o 








5 


Rubin, Kenneth A. 


X 


X 


X 


5 Samilijan, Peter 


X 


X 





5 


Sneirson, Gerald 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Spartos, Mary Anne 





o 





5 


Steinman, Roy H. 


X 


o 


o 


5 


Stephens, Thomas J. 





o 





5 


Sullivan, Jill 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Talkov, Roger 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Toner, Colleen 


X 


X 





5 


Tripolsky, Sharon Jaffe 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Van Dam, David S. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Vanderburg, Linso 





X 


X 


5 


Weiner, Lawrence J. 


X 


X 


o 


5 


Wilson, Catherine E. 


X 


X 





5 


Winston, Alice Jane 


X 


X 


X 


5 Zarinsky, Irma 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, David E. 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, Virginia 


X 


X 


X 


5 iZuchero, William R. 





X 






55 



Swampscott Town Meeting Members 



Pre |Name 


May 19 


May 20 May 21 


6 Baker, Robert 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Bayard, Susan 


O 





o 


6 


Belkin, Sylvia B. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Block, Ina-Lee 


X 


X 


o 


6 


Block, Lawrence S. 


X 


X 





6 


Burke, Michael F. 


X 


X 





6 


Cassidy, Reid J. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Cassidy-Driscoll, Tara L. 


X 








6 


Dembowski, Claire C. 


X 


o 


o 


6 


Derr, Jo Ann Simons 


X 


o 


o 


6 


DiLisio, Robert 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Driscoll, Thomas H. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Dussault, Barbara 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Erlich, Norman 


X 


X 





6 


Freedman, Lawrence 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Gold, Anne W. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Goldberg, Arthur 


X 


X 





6 


Goldman, Jeffrey W. 


X 


X 





6 


Gorman, Paul J. 


X 


o 


X 


6 


Gupta, Mary Kelley 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Horwitz, Patricia Kravtin 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Kane, Susan K. 


X 


o 





6 


Klayman, Nancy 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Koidin, Jill 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Levenson, Paul E. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Levenson, Sheryl 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Locke, Judith E. 








o 


6 


Markarian, Joseph 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Merkle, Cynthia 


X 


X 


X 


6 


O'Hare, Mary Michael 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Paster, Marc 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Paster, Ruth 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Pelletier, Maria 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Pitman, Martha 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Pollison, Richard P. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Pollison, Sharon 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Rotner, Kim 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Rotner, Philip 


X 


o 





6 


Ryan, Daniel H. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Sackett, Shelly A. 


X 


X 





6 


Seligman, Edward 


X 


X 


o 


6 


Shulkin, Catherine 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Shulkin, Randall S. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Shutzer, Carole B. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Shutzer, Kenneth B. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Valle, Michele M. 


o 


X 


X 


6 


Wagner, Elizabeth Swift 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Walsh, Kerin T. 


X 


o 





6 


Watson, Brian T. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Weaver, Walter 


o 


X 


o 


6 


Witt, Sherri L. 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Yaeger, Dan 


X 


X 


X 


6 lYaeger, Lisa L. 


X 


X 


X 


6 iYellin, Benjamin 


X 


X 


X 



56 



TOWN COLLECTOR and COLLECTOR OF TAXES 




JACK L. PASTER 








IN ACCOUNT WITH THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT - 7/1/2002 to 6/30/2003 






COLLECTIONS: 








Real Estate Taxes 


$ 26,472,507.31 


Personal Property Taxes 


$ 339,624.53 


Tax Title Collections 


$ 5,338.57 


Deferred Tax Collections 


$ 


Automobile Excise Taxes 


$ 1,824,246.20 


Water/Sewer Collections 


$ 1,847,199.29 


Water Service Charges 


$ 8,459.47 


Harbor Mooring Fees 


$ 12,153.00 


Boat Excise Taxes 


$ 7,244.98 






NOTE: 




Interest/charges/demand fees are included in the above figures 








Departmental Accounts Receivables: 








Dept. Receipts received through Collector's "CASH" System 


$ 505,879.31 


Veteran Pension Reimbursements 


$ 


Non-Contributory Reimbursements 


$ 27,587.13 


School Tuitions 


$ 1,049,993.40 


Rentals (Fish House, DAR etc) 


$ 24,090.00 


Fire Alarm Box Fees 


$ 7,032.00 






Other interest/charges/demand fees/RM V mark&clear fees 


$ 19,448.05 


Fees for preparing Certificates of Municipal Lien 


$ 51,150.00 


Fines assessed on Returned Checks 


$ 1,748.07 






Interest earned on Collector's Cash Management account 


$ 9,184.57 






Total Collected - July 1 , 2002 to June 30, 2003 


$ 32,212,885.88 



57 



TREASURER 

Denise M Dembkoski 



Treasurer's Cash Statement 
In account with the Town of Swampscott 
Balance on hand July 1, 2002: 
Receipts and income from all sources: 
Less warrants paid (payroll and vendor): _ 
Balance on hand June 30, 2003. 
Interest income earned 07/01/02 - 06/30/03: ~ 

TOWN OF 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer 



$10,634,231 
$47,827,221 
($43,889,556) 
$14,571,896 
$117,999 
SWAMPSCOTT 
Balance 
7/1/02 



TRUST AND SPECIAL FUNDS 

Deposits Interest 



Withdrawals 



Balance 
06/30/03 



Ppmptprv f^iftc R. Rpmipath^ 


$114,991 


$0 


$3,155 


$0 


£118 146 


ppmptprv Ppr*r»pti i o I Oorp 
ocri i icic i y rci Liciuai vaic 


$313,540 


$27 900 


$8,910 


($3 299^ 


$347 051 


I ihrarv - f^pnpral I ihrarv Trust 


$67,239 


$0 


$1,845 


$0 


$69,084 


Library - Linscott Trust 


$120,779 


$0 


$3,254 


($34,313) 


$89,720 


Library - Hussey Trust 


$76,417 


$0 


$1,999 


($9,219) 


$69,197 


Library - Johnson Trust 


$44 


$0 


$1 


$0 


$45 


Police - Dare Account 


$62,748 


$3,531 


$893 


($32,287) 


$34,885 


Police - Community Policing 


$52,743 


$17,725 


$1,609 


($71,641) 


$437 


Police - Cops Fast 


$368 


$0 


$1 


($369) 


($0) 


Police - Cops More 


$463 


$0 


$1 


($464) 


($0) 


Police - Drug Enforcement 


$6,276 


$3,719 


$173 


($6,131) 


$4,037 


Police - Law Enforcement 


$3,509 


$0 


$75 


($825) 


$2,759 


Police - School Resource Officer 


$52,276 


$97,222 


$1,930 


($137,538) 


$13,890 


Stabilization Account 


$751,916 


$388,078 


$20,834 


$0 


$1,160,828 


Conservation Fund 


$75,600 


$1,125 


$2,088 


$0 


$78,813 


Phillips Medal 


$3,159 


$0 


$84 


($234) 


$3,009 


MWRA Program 


$28,559 


$0 


$783 


($1,742) 


$27,600 


Performance Bonds 


$165,841 


$0 


$3,225 


($75,788) 


$93,279 


War Memorial Fund 


$122,677 


$1,780 


$3,274 


($4,635) 


$123,096 


Totals 


$2,019,145 


$541,080 


$54,134 


($378,485) 


$2,235,874 



58 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 2003 the Town of Swampscott had to comply with Governmental 
Accounting Standards Board Statement 34 for fixed assets. This is the first time that cities and towns had 
to show fixed assets on our books and the depreciation associated with them. The Town had an 
Inventory done in June of 2002 for all assets valued over $1,000 with the Town's threshold for GASB 34 
being $15,000. We were also required to operate Enterprise Funds for Water and Sewer. The Funds 
are now known as Proprietary Funds. 

The following is the Fiscal Year 2003-year end Governmental Funds Balance Sheet, Statement of 
Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances for Governmental Funds, Statement of Net 
Assets for Proprietary Funds, Statement of Revenue, Expenses and Changes in Fund Net Assets for 
Proprietary Funds, Statement of Fiduciary Net Assets for Fiduciary Funds, Statement of Changes in 
Fiduciary Net Assets for Fiduciary Funds and Schedule of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund 
Balance, Budget to Actual for the General Fund. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

David Castellarin 
Town Accountant 



59 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

BALANCE SHEET 

JUNE 30, 2003 



ASSETS General 



Cash and short-term investments $ 

Receivables, net of uncollectibles: 

Real estate and personal property taxes 

Tax liens 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 

Trash fees 



2,757,827 $ 

434,505 
242,422 
83,030 
446 



TOTAL ASSETS $ 3,518,230 $ 

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 

LIABILITIES: 

Warrants payable $ 199,383 $ 

Tax refunds payable 30,000 

Other liabilities 216,753 

Deferred revenues 506,875 

Notes payable 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 953,011 



FUND BALANCES: 
Reserved for: 

Encumbrances and continuing appropriations 299,552 

Perpetual permanent funds 

Unreserved: 

Designated for subsequent year's expenditures 793,000 

Undesignated, reported in: 

General fund 1 ,472,667 

Special revenue funds 

Capital projects funds 

Permanent funds 



Special 
Revenue 



3,006,647 $ 



3,006,647 $ 



62,389 $ 



62,389 



2,944,258 



Capital 
Projects 



6,068,442 $ 



Governmental 
Trust Funds 

860,108 $ 



6,068,442 S 



327,458 $ 



3,200,000 



3,527.458 



2,540,984 



860,108 $ 



402,865 



457,243 



Total 
Governmental 
Funds 



12,693,024 

434,505 
242,422 
83,030 
446 



13,453.427 



589,230 
30,000 
216,753 
506,875 
3,200,000 



4.542,858 



299,552 
402,865 

793,000 

1 ,472,667 
2,944,258 
2,540,984 
457,243 



TOTAL FUND BALANCES 




2,565,219 


2,944,258 


2,540,984 


860,108 


8,910,569 


TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 


$ 


3,518,230 $ 


3,006,647 $ 


6,068,442 $ 


860,108 $ 


13,453,427 



60 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2003 












Total 






Special 




Governmental 


Governmental 




General 


Revenue 


Projects 


Trust Funds 


Funds 


Hh VbNUbb 












Real estate and personal property taxes. 












net of tax refunds 


$ 26,829,298 $ 


- $ 


- $ 


- $ 


26,829,298 




i,/oj,uoo 








1 ,783,06b 


Charges for services 


295 


- 


- 


- 


295 




101,052 








101 ,052 




a ~7r\r\ n~7 a 

o,/UU,974 


1,316,359 






O f\ * "7 OOO 

8,01 7,333 




1 noo 700 


2,429,061 






O ICO Ov< O 






ooo mo 

388,078 




on noo 


419,017 




131 ,517 


24,120 




24,857 


1 On Ad A 

180,494 


tatai DQ/CMI ICO 




4,157,618 




55,796 


ACl TOO ono 

40,789. J9o 


CVDCMPVITI IDCC 

LArtNUI 1 Unbb 












Current; 
















40,082 


131 ,818 


4,Dl / 


2,771 ,457 




■ 0,U 13,/ / O 


one f\QQ 
ODD ,Uyy 


Q RA7 


ft 1^1 


c oon ccc 




1 "7 A A O CC7 


o ceo 770 
2.DDO, / / J 


1 CDC CIO 




01 TOO QCO 




1 1 ^7 Qfift 


OAQ QQO 


qo 070 




1 c,o.n. ooo 




1 ,060,886 


22,118 


22,723 




1,105,727 


Culture and recreation 


581,084 


42,925 


32,355 


39,831 


696,195 




a one on 








yl QnC QOO 

4,oUb,ooo 


Employee benefits 


2,704,752 


- 


- 


- 


2,704,752 




on nnn 








on nnn 




546,976 








546,976 


Debt service: 














1 ocn nnn 








1 ocn nnn 




520,744 








520,744 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


37,687,628 


3,433,989 


1,964,428 


50,479 


43,136,524 


tXCfcbb (DEFICIENCY) Or REVfcNUco 












OVER EXPENDITURES 


(1,111,644) 


723.629 


(1,964,428) 


5.317 


(2,347,126) 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 












Proceeds from bonds and notes 






1 ,981 ,000 




1,981,000 




26.082 


- 




- 


26,082 


Onprstinn trprtQf^rc mit 


(612 ^ QQ ^ 










TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES). 


(586.317) 




1.981,000 




1 ,394,683 


NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES 


(1,697,961) 


723,629 


16,572 


5,317 


(952,443) 


FUND BALANCES AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 


4,263,180 


2.220.629 


2.524.412 


854,791 


9.863.012 


FUND BALANCES AT END OF YEAR 


S 2,565,219 $ 


2,944,258 $ 


2,540.984 $ 


860.108 J 


> 8.910,569 



61 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 

JUNE 30, 2003 




















Business-type Activities - Enterprise Funds 

; 






Water 


oewer 


1 Uldl 


ASSETS 










PI IRRPMT* 














1,241,535 $ 


277,943 $ 


1,519,478 


WfltPr fppc 




I ,*r 1 0, / OO 




I I O, / OO 


Qouiar fooc 






Q77 C\AfK 


Q77 HAft 


1 ntQ r r\ r\\ /o m mo nt a 1 






442 


A AO 


Total current assets 




2,657,268 


1 ,255,433 


3,912,701 


MHMPI IRRPMT- 










RpppiwQhipc npt of allowanrp for uncollpctihlps* 


















oon HOC. 


Capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation 




1,110,618 


16,824,009 


17,934,627 


Total noncurrent assets 




1,110,618 


17,654,034 


18,764,652 


TOTAL ASSETS 




3,767,886 


18,909,467 


22,677,353 


LIADILI 1 ICO 










CURRENT: 














46,129 


19,564 


65,693 


Accrued interest 




4,649 


264,838 


269,487 


Bonds and notes payable 




222,026 


925,254 


1,147,280 






272,804 


1 ,209,656 


1 ,482,460 


NONCURRENT: 










Bonds and notes payable 




1 ,346,240 


10,714,272 


12,060,512 


Total noncurrent liabilities 




1 ,346,240 


10,714,272 


12,060,512 


TOTAL LIABILITIES 




1,619,044 


1 1 ,923,928 


13,542,972 


NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt 




455,797 
1 ,693,045 


5,206,354 
1,779,185 


5,662,151 
3,472,230 


TOTAL NET ASSETS 


$ 


2,148,842 $ 


6,985,539 $ 


9,134,381 





62 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND NET ASSETS 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2003 



Business-type Activities - Enterprise Funds 



OPERATING REVENUES: 

Charges for services $ 

Intergovernmental 

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES 

OPERATING EXPENSES: 

Cost of services and administration 

Depreciation 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 

OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) 

NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES): 

Investment income 

Interest expense 

TOTAL NONOPERATING 
REVENUES (EXPENSES), NET 

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE 
OPERATING TRANSFERS 

OPERATING TRANSFERS: 

Transfers in 

TOTAL OPERATING TRANSFERS 

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 

NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR $ 



Water 



2,260,669 $ 



2,260,669 



1,621,623 
34,056 



1 ,655,679 



604,990 



36,333 
(27,047) 



9,286 



614,276 



614,276 



1 ,534,566 



2,148,842 $ 



Sewer 

1,548,160 $ 
447,639 



1,995,799 



750,515 
501 ,826 



1,252,341 



743,458 



10,876 
(641,166) 



(630,290) 



113,168 



612,399 



612,399 



725,567 



6,259,972 



6,985,539 $ 



Total 

3,808,829 
447,639 



4,256,468 



2,372,138 
535,882 



2,908,020 



1 ,348,448 



47,209 
(668,213) 



(621 ,004) 



727,444 



612,399 



612,399 



1 ,339,843 



7,794,538 



9,134,381 



63 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2003 



Pension 

Trust Fund Private 
(as of December Purpose Agency 

31, 2001) Trust Funds Funds 

ASSETS 

CURRENT: 



Cash and short-term investments 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectibles: 

Departmental and other 


....$ 


1,541,009 $ 
20,981,872 

1 ,287,893 


294,308 


$ 


124,080 


TOTAL ASSETS 




23,810,774 


294,308 




124,080 


LIABILITIES 

Warrants payable 

Liabilities due depositors 




424,403 






124,080 


TOTAL LIABILITIES 




424,403 






124,080 


NET ASSETS 

Held in trust for pension benefits and other purposes 


$ 


23,507,258 $ 


294,308 


$ 





64 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2003 



Pension 




Trust Fund 


Private 


(as of December 


Purpose 


31,2001) 


Trust Funds 


2,022,976 $ 




721,921 


_ 


- 


292,101 


2,744,897 


292,101 


(2,831,231) 




1,337,161 


2,207 


(1,494,070) 


2,207 


(173,816) 




(1,667,886) 


2,207 


258,271 


159,360 


1 ,494,642 


294,308 


135,889 




194,060 




3,217,363 




3,547,312 


(2,052,670) 


294,308 


25,559,928 





ADDITIONS: 
Contributions: 

Employer $ 

Employee 

Private donations 

Total contributions 

Net investment income (loss): 

Net change in fair value of investments 

Interest 

Total investment income (loss) 

Less: investment expense 

Net investment income (loss) 

Intergovernmental 

Transfers from other systems 

TOTAL ADDITIONS 

DEDUCTIONS: 

Administration 

Transfers to other systems 

Retirement benefits and refunds 

TOTAL DEDUCTIONS 

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 

NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 

NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR $ 



23,507,258 $ 



294,308 



65 



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66 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Vera H. Harrington, Chairman Michael A. Tumulty, Assistant Assessor 

Neil G. Sheehan, Secretary Pamela R. Hogan, Clerk 

John V. Phelan, III Linda L. Paster, Clerk 

In accordance with Article 4 Section 2 of the by-laws of the Town of Swampscott, the 
Board of Assessors herewith submits its annual report to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott 
for the fiscal year 2003. 

In Fiscal 2003, real estate values continued to increase, not only in Swampscott, but 
across the state. However, the Board of Assessors left overall assessments unchanged from 
FY2002. The decision was based on the significant increase in FY2002 combined with the 2002 
override, which resulted in an increase in the tax bill. Although the increase in assessment did 
not contribute to an increase in the average tax bill, the Board determined the taxpayers should 
have an opportunity to discuss the increase in assessment. 

Under the provisions of Proposition 2 1 /4, the Department of Revenue requires all real 
estate to reflect 100% of market value every three years at minimum. However, the Department 
of Revenue strongly recommends the property assessments to be analyzed every year and the 
assessments reflect the real estate values every year. This process is referred to as interim year 
adjustments (those fiscal years between the three year mandated revaluation). Since no interim 
year adjustment was done in 2003, the difference in assessments and sale prices is 
approximately 20% necessitating an interim year adjustment in 2004. However, an increase in 
2004 assessments will not necessarily result in higher tax bills beyond the aggregate 2 1 /4% 
allowed by law. 

Additionally, under proposition 2 1 /4, the town is required to physically measure and 
inspect all real estate within the community every ten years. The last time a complete measure 
and listing of all properties was conducted was in 1995. Therefore the assessors have 
implemented a measure and inspection program, which will be complete by 2005. Taxpayers are 
asked for their cooperation since this process ensures a more accurate assessment resulting in 
fair and equitable assessments, and a fair and consistent distribution of the tax burden. 

The practice of interim year adjustments has allowed the Board to maintain fair and 
defensible values at the Appellate Tax Board. This has resulted in the Board voting once again to 
release $750,000 from the overlay reserve to the surplus account. This release brings the total 
amount released by the Board to $1.5 million since 1997. 

At the town wide election in April, Mr. John V. Phelan, III was elected to his third three 
year term. Subsequently, at the Board of Assessors reorganizational meeting, Mrs. Vera 
Harrington serving in her 42 nd year with the town, was voted Chairperson. Mr. Neil G. Sheehan 
was appointed Secretary to the Board. 

The Senior abatement work-off program is now in its 4 th year and continues to benefit 
both the town and seniors through the voluntary work performed by twenty senior citizens 
throughout the town. The total amount of abatements issued through the program for Fiscal 2003 
was $10,000. 

In a joint meeting on November 26, 2002, the Board of Selectmen once again voted to 
maintain a split tax rate. The approved rates for Fiscal 2003 are $13.52 per thousand for 
residential property and $24.26 per thousand for commercial, industrial, and personal property. 

Statutory exemptions, which is mandatory under Chapter 59 MGL totaled $1 13,938 to 
235 qualified homeowners 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 



Number of Vehicles 1 2, 521 

Excise Tax $1,667,576 
BOAT EXCISE 

Number of Vessels 21 2 

Excise Tax $9,338.00 



67 



The Board of Assessors wishes to express its appreciation to Mr. Andrew Maylor, David 
Castellarin, Jack Paster and Denise Dembkoski for their cooperation and assistance throughout 
the year. 

The Board of Assessors, herewith submits its figures used to determine the tax rate for 
Fiscal year 2003. 
Respectfully submitted 
Vera H. Harrington, Chairperson 
Neil G. Sheehan, Secretary 
John V. Phelan, III 



68 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 
FISCAL 2003 TAX LEVY LIMITATION FOR 

SWAMPSCOTT 

FOR BUDGET PLANNING PURPOSES 



L TO CALCULATE THE FY2002 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2001 Levy Limit 

A1 ADD Amended FY2001 Growth 

B. ADD ( IA + IA1 ) X 2.5% 

C. ADD FY2002 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2002 Override 

E. FY2002 Subtotal 

F. FY2002 Levy Ceiling 

0. TO CALCULATE THE FY2003 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2002 Levy Limit from I. 

A1 ADD Amended FY2002 Growth 

B. ADD ( IIA + IIA1 ) X2.5% 

C. ADD FY2003 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2003 Override 

E. FY2003 Subtotal 

F. FY2003 Levy Ceiling 



III. TO CALCULATE THE FY2003 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LEVY 



21,870,611 







546,765 



180,347 



2,469,790 



25,067,513 



47.012,686 



25,067,513 







626,688 



259,116 



25,953,317 



47,321,088 



$ 



25,067,513 



FY2002 Levy Limit 



II. 



25,953,317 



FY2003 Levy Limit 



A. FY2003 Levy Limit from II. 

B. FY2003 Debt Exclusion(s) 

C. FY2003 Capital Expenditure Exclusion(s) 

D. FY2003 Other Adjustment 

E. FY2003 Water /Sewer 

F. FY2003 Maximum Allowable Levy 



25,953,317 



1.074,405 



27,027.722 



69 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Kenneth B. Shutzer, Esquire, Chairman 
Anthony Scibelli, Esquire, Vice-Chairman 

Robert Baker, Clerk David Janes 

Edward M. Breed 
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS: 

Michael Gorenstein Daniel Doherty, Esquire 

The Zoning Board of Appeals held 14 hearings during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2003; 51 
new petitions were filed, 43 approved, 3 withdrawn, 3 denied and 22 continued for further hearing. We 
would like to thank Joseph Latronica, the new full-time Inspector of Buildings, for his technical support 
and assistance. The Associate Members of the Board contributed valuable expertise to the Board. The 
Board's Secretary, Linda Paster has been invaluable to the Board for her thoroughness and 
professionalism and by the assistance shown to Petitioners. 

The Board wishes to acknowledge Michael Gorenstein and Daniel E. Doherty as Associate 
Members of the Board. In addition, Edward M. Breed was reappointed to a five (5) year term as a regular 
member. Michael Gorenstein was reappointed to a two (2) year term as an associate member. The 
Board wishes to further recognize its retiring Vice-Chairman, Anthony Scibelli, Esquire for the dedication 
and professionalism afforded his colleagues and the public during the prior past six (6) years of service. 
Mr. Scibelli's keen wit and deliberative reasoning will be sadly missed. 

In the course of the last fourteen (14) hearings and numerous new and continued petitions, the Board 
periodically identifies an issue(s) having greater and more profound impact than the property on which it 
is situated. In that regard, the Board notes the continued importance of the adoption of the new 
Swampscott Zoning By-Law, which was unanimously approved at Town Meeting. As with all revisions 
there are certain unforeseen refinements, changes and modifications that will periodically be presented to 
Town Meeting for their review in an attempt to continue to refine and improve upon our current Zoning By- 
Law. In this regard, the Board of Appeals thanks all of the members of the Zoning By-Law Review 
Committee who have tirelessly over the last year sought the input of the Board of Appeals and Planning 
Board in its attempt to define incongruities and inconsistencies unforeseen when the current By-Law was 
remanded by Town Meeting back to the Planning Board for further study. 

Another area of interest concerns the status of municipal legislation to restrict local control of low 
and moderate income housing pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40B, commonly 
referred to as the "Anti-Snob Zoning Act." The act provides for an expedited hearing and review 
procedure for low and moderate-income housing proposals. Qualified applicants file an application for a 
single "comprehensive permit" with the Zoning Board of Appeals rather than filing individual applications 
with each local agency or official having jurisdiction over every aspect of the proposal. The critical 
element of this process is the power given the Board of Appeals to override local requirements and 
regulations that are not "consistent with local needs." Additionally, the act although obligated to 
encourage or require developers to fund or construct affordable housing, is now being used as a vehicle 
to expend the perimeters of local zoning by-laws by permitting the Board of Appeals to supersede local 
zoning by-law regulations through the comprehensive permitting process. The unsuccessful applicant, if 
denied the permit by the Board of Appeals, can appeal the denial of the permit or the conditions imposed 
in a permit, to the Housing Appeal Committee (HAC), a state agency within the Department of Housing 
and Community Development. The scope of this process and the complexity of the procedure have 
resulted in Board Members attending Chapter 40B instructional seminars to better prepare for the 
application(s) which appear to be in the pipeline. A recent example of this process was the allowance of 
an eight (8) unit project at 225 Humphrey Street, which will provide the community two (2) low and 
moderate-income housing units and the remainder to be sold at market rates. Insofar as, this trend is 
new to the Town, but for the previously permitted Bertram House the Board thoroughly reviews and 
confers with its sister boards as well as employing the services of an independent expert chosen by the 
Board, but yet funded by the applicant. This process provides the needed input by an objective third 
party schooled in the area of like projects. 

A recurring issue is the interrelationship between existing structures and a residential district, 
especially one involving an expansion and impact on abutting properties. That issue was directly 
explored as an outgrowth of a Petition to convert the former Parkview/Fenders restaurant into a Dunkin 
Donuts fast food restaurant establishment. The concept and the use albeit permittable, when taken into 
consideration with the advent of the proposed new high school directly across the street and the traffic 



70 



flow patterns and parking at the site it became an impracticable location to site the business. This 
decision when taken in the larger context confirms the nature of the site-specific decision as opposed to 
any generalized plan or scheme employed by the Board in making its decisions. It is in this regard that 
the Board is cognizant of an ever-increasing trend in densely populated and desirable towns to demolish 
and/or rebuild structures, which may or may not be in keeping with the public sentiment or character of 
the area. Matters such as this can not be viewed in a vacuum and require the input and vigilant oversight 
of both the Selectmen and Planning Board (site plan review) to insure that the introduction of any new 
growth is not at the expense of its residential abutters or for that matter, existing businesses. 

A unique aspect of Swampscott's demographics and zoning districts is the introduction of a dozen 
or more grandfathered business lots and pre-existing usage, which abut residential neighborhoods. This 
issue, albeit problematic is best handled on an individual case by case basis to structure a systematic 
inter-relationship on a site-specific basis. Crafting such decisions mindful of the concerns voiced by 
neighbors requires comprehensive review and detailed reasoning to minimize the potential risk of 
extensive court litigation. It is with that charge that the Board of Appeals views its responsibility to adopt 
the needs of the public, which is serves. 

The Board, through its Chair, wishes to personally thank the Chairman of the Zoning By-Law 
Review Committee Robert Baker and the tireless efforts of its members, who systematically incorporated 
the revisions mandated by the Attorney General's Office. The Board in particular believes that the new 
streamlined and demystified Zoning By-Law provides for a more cogent and user-friendly document to the 
individual applicant. 

With the potential for new or redefined growth, the Board encourages participation both in 
neighborhood issues as well as matters that have the potential for Town wide impact. The Board 
therefore, continues to encourage individual participation at the Public Hearings. 

Issues such as these and other matters have enormous import to the Town requiring exhaustive 
review and deliberations. The Board welcomes the opportunity to serve the Town in this capacity as well 
as the special permit requests by individual homeowners. 

The Board acknowledges the difficult decisions which it is called upon to render but can state its 
decisions have generally withstood the scrutiny of the Courts and have ultimately resulted in fewer 
appeals and reduced costs to the Town both legal and otherwise. 

The Board further appreciates the professionalism shown to it by members of the Bar and 
individuals who appear on their own behalf in the preparation of petitions and supporting documentation 
as requested. 

Kenneth B. Shutzer was reelected Chairman, Anthony Scibelli elected Vice-Chairman, and Robert Baker 
elected Clerk of the Board. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Chairman 

Kenneth B. Shutzer, Esquire 



71 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS: JOSEPH LATRONICA 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: MICHELE POSTE 

LOCAL INSPECTOR: KATHY MAGEE 

PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: PETER MCCARRISTON 

ALTERNATE PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: MICHAEL WALDMAN 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: DANIEL CAHILL 

ALTERNATE ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: GORDON LYONS 

The Town of Swampscott Building Department, in order to better serve the community, has 
instituted several changes this year. A full time administrative assistant has been hired. The inspector of 
wires and alternate Inspector of wires are now part of the Building Department, and the Building 
Department offices have been re-located to the first floor of Town Hall, in the connector, previously the 
location of the Department of Public Works. 

These changes should add considerably to the access to and information from the Building Department. 

The Building Department is charged with the interpretation and enforcement of the 
Massachusetts State Building Code and the Town of Swampscott Zoning By-Laws. The review of all 
projects and issuance of permits to construct, re-construct, alter, repair and demolish. 

The Building Department would like to acknowledge the time, effort and expertise of Richard 
Mcintosh, serving as interim Inspector of Buildings from May 2002 until February of 2003, and especially 
to Helen Collins for seventeen years of service, as Building Department administrative assistant, thank 
you both. 

The following information outlines the Building Department activity for the fiscal year 2003 (July 
1,2002-June 30,2003). Fire alarm master box invoices sent out were forty-six (46) total amount collected 
$9200.00. Total number of permits issued, fee amounts and estimated construction costs that have been 
collected are as follows: 

Permits and Fees: Total # of permits : Total $ of fees : Total Constr. Cost: 

Building 387 $114,978.00 $20,209,404.80 

Plumbing 355 $10,328.00 

Gas 302 $9,300.00 

Wiring 365 $32,604.00 

Cert, of Inspection 8 $280.00 

Cert. Of Occupancy 14 $385.00 : 



Respectfully, 
Joseph P. Latronica 
Inspector of Buildings 



1431 $167,875.00 $20,209,404.80 



72 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Nelson Kessler, Co-Chairman 
Mark T. Mahoney 
Thomas Ruskin 



Geralyn P. M. Falco, Co-Chairman 
Joseph P. Crimmins, Esquire 
Peter Vasiliou, P.E. 



Antigone Simmons, Esquire 

The Conservation Commission is a seven member appointed body. Its function is to 
oversee activities in the coastal zone and other wetlands in town, enforce the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act, and to uphold the Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act. 

In fiscal year 2003, the Commission held twenty-nine (29) meetings, at which: three (3) 
Requests for Determination of Applicability were made, followed up by two (2) Determinations of 
Applicability; two (2) Abbreviated Notices of Intent and nine (9) Notices of Intent were made, 
followed up by the issuance of six (6) Orders of Condition; one (1 ) Extension of an Order of 
Condition was issued; no Enforcement Order were issued; and three (3) Certificates of 
Compliance were granted. Several informational meetings with the School Building Committee to 
clarify issues surrounding the building of a new high school at Jackson Park. A special meeting 
was held to discuss the jurisdiction of the Commission regarding Article 97 of state law. 

The Commission would also like to thank the DPW, the Building Inspector, and all of the 
officials both public and private that have worked with us throughout the year. We would like to 
extend our special thanks to the help that all the lawyers in town made to further the 
understanding of Article 97 and how it affects the Commission. 



73 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

MISSION STATEMENT 

To serve all Seniors with dignity and positive regard 

• To identify and respond to the needs of elders and to advocate on their 
behalf 

• To promote an awareness in the community of issues regarding seniors. 
BOARD MEMBERS STAFF 

Mary Abramson, Chairperson Executive Director, Martha Marcou 

Estelle Epstein, Special Programs Van Driver, Bob Gordon 

Mary Cobbett, Policy GLSS Site Manager, Helen Richard 

Bea Breitstein, GLSS Board Member Outreach Coordinator, Warren Hopkins 

Susan Fisher, Secretary/Policy Activities Coordinator, Kathy Laurino 

Felice Litman, Arts/S.H.I.N.E. Counselor Office Assistant, Susan Pierce 

Marion Stone, Special Events 
Arlene Rosen, Special Projects 
Deborah Giovannucci, Special Projects 

The Swampscott Council on Aging is a Policy-making board. At the present time we have 
a full board with nine members serving on special committees. We welcome new members 
Arlene Rosen and Deborah Giovannucci to the board. 
HIGHLIGHTS OF 2002-2003 

The volunteer appreciation lunch with entertainment by Brandy Irish was held at the 
Porthole Pub on May 28, 2003. Marc Paster, chairman of the Board of Selectmen presented 
awards of recognition from Congressman Tierney's office to several of our hard working 
volunteers. Rita Dilisio, Mary Lydon, Mary and Tony Rossetti, Ella Corke, Larry Katz, Helen 
Richard, and Leonard Melanson. We are privileged to have three volunteers who have been with 
us for twenty years or more. They are the unsung heroes, the ones who avoid the spotlight and 
are my role models on how to live a longer life while serving others; they are Ginnie and Angelo 
Losano, and Roland Dube. 

Folks enjoyed the Duck Tour, Horizon's Edge Cruise and lunch at North Shore Vocational 
and Technical High School where the students served a delicious lunch; they also published our 
first information booklet. In March we held our annual St. Patrick's Day party and members of the 
Nahant Senior Center were our invited guests. The Big Dig Tour was a success as well as the 
Turkey Train and Warren's Lobster House in Kittery Maine. In September the French Chef made 
his annual appearance and the meal was superb. The 55 Alive driving safety program was well 
attended and was thought to be worthwhile by the participants. Several informative and 
entertaining events are being planned for the upcoming year. Several of our trips are being 
planned with Dot Mancilli Guy's and Doll's. Watch for upcoming trips in the monthly newsletter 
The Compass. 
RENOVATIONS 

During the past year a new handicapped ramp was installed and the parking lot was 
repaved. This makes a much safer entrance and exit for the elders. 
TRANSPORTATION 

Transportation is a very important part of the services offered to Swampscott seniors. 
The Council continues to offer transportation to and from the center for the lunch program. Food 
shopping and banking take place on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. Local trips to department 
stores take place on Friday. Reservations are made by calling the Senior Center on the day that 
the ride is needed. Medical transportation can be arranged through GLSS, The Ride and private 
vendors. 

OUTREACH PROGRAM 

One of the primary functions of any senior center is their outreach effort. Currently a 
professional who meets with or visits elders in our community staffs Swampscott's outreach 
program. This service requires strict attention on the part of our staff when it comes to listening to 
and understanding people's problems. In this way we can refer them to the proper agency and 
minimize the amounts of forms and telephone calls for those involved. Medical and legal 
concerns, along with health care, housing, transportation, finance, and insurance are some of the 
issues that are addressed. 



74 



INFORMATION AND REFFERAL 

The information and referral service provides a very essential function for the senior 
community. Although we try to assist elders and their families directly whenever possible, many 
times we act as the intermediary, referring people to various agencies. Issues regarding 
transportation, home health care, and meals on wheels, nursing homes and adult day care are 
just some of the many areas in which information and assistance are available. 
ELDER OUTREACH 

In January of 2003 an Elder Outreach Group was formed to encourage people in the 
community to be aware of elders in their neighborhood and to watch for signs of distress. The 
committee consists of representatives from the Board of Selectmen, Council on Aging, Health 
Department, C.O.A. Board of Directors, Police Department, Fire Department, Representatives 
from G.L.S.S., and The Attorney General's Office. The results of these meetings led to the 
establishment of several initiatives. The first being the Are You O.K.? Program, a telephone 
reassurance program formed in conjunction with the Nahant Police Department. Secondly, the 
L.E.A.P. program (Local Elderly Awareness Program) under the direction of Sue Sussman, 
Swampscott Middle School nurse was formed. A pamphlet was developed describing 
observations that may indicate that elders need help. The students then presented the results of 
their research to the elementary school pupils. 
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP 

A Caregiver Support Group that is facilitated by Debby Segil of G.L.S.S., meets twice a 
month at the senior center and functions as a support activity for those caring for elderly friends 
or family who are ailing. 
S.H.I.N.E 

S.H.I.N.E. (Serving the Health Insurance Needs of Elders) SHINE counselor Jim Kehoe 
retired this year after serving the seniors of Swampscott for 1 years. We are most appreciative 
of his efforts. We were most fortunate to have two highly skilled people to pick up the torch and 
take the training for this very important program. Warren Hopkins and Felice Litman have both 
been certified as counselors and are available on Thursday mornings at 11:00 and by 
appointment. 

MEN'S CLUB SPEAKER SERIES 

There were several interesting speakers arranged by Warren Hopkins during the past 
year. Topics vary and all are welcome. Dick Lynch, former football and basketball coach here in 
Swampscott did a presentation of "Sport Highlights" that occurred during his tenure. In 
September Dr. Sandeep Jain from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary spoke about eye 
diseases and current treatments. November brought Susan Cripps regional director of the 
S.H.I.N.E. program, Serving the Health Insurance Needs of Elders. She addressed issues 
regarding Medicare and Medi-Gap. At the anniversary dinner in January Andrew Maylor, Town 
Administrator highlighted the state of the town and his goals for the Town of Swampscott. Cheryl 
Gresek from Congressman Tierney's office gave a very timely talk on Identity Theft. In March 
Rachel Weiner and Pamela Meisner from the Attorney General's Office talked about consumer 
fraud. On a lighter note Nick Lopardo gave an overview of the many improvements made to 
Fraser Field in Lynn, home of the North Shore Spirit baseball team. The recent enactment of the 
H.I.P.A.A. (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) was explained by Brian Kozik and 
James Harris of the North Shore Medical Center. In June Joe DeMarkey from the Bank of New 
York spoke about the details of reverse mortgages. We Are always open to suggestions; call the 
senior center with your ideas. 

Other programs conducted during the year include: 
Flu Shot Clinic in collaboration with the Swampscott Board of Health 
Stroke Prevention Clinic 

Distribution of Farmers Market Coupons to low-income seniors 

A grant funded taxi service for elders who require non-emergency medical transportation on short 
notice 

The Inter-faith Food Pantry collects non-perishable foods from local churches and temples and 
distributes groceries at the Senior Center and Senior Housing units monthly 



75 



NUTRITION 

Meals are served five days a week from 1 1:45 until 12:30. No reservations are required 
for lunch. Meals on Wheels for homebound seniors are available. Presently, Greater Lynn 
Senior Services deliver approximately 50 meals daily to Swampscott residents. 
PROGRAMS, CLASSES.TRIPS 

Several classes and trips are offered to seniors. Information on classes and trips appear 
in our monthly newsletter, The Compass, the Swampscott Reporter, Lynn Item, and Salem News, 
and by calling the Center. Classes continue in Osteoporosis Prevention Exercise, Writing and 
Stretch and Tone. The Stretch and Tone is a new class this year that was initially funded by Title 
III grants and is now self-supporting. 
HEALTH PROGRAMS 

Blood pressure readings take place on every Tuesday. The Swampscott's town nurse, 
All Care V.N. A., the Swampscott Marblehead V.N. A, and Action Ambulance conduct readings. A 
new program this year involves having the town public health nurse, June Blake here each 
Thursday from 11:30 until 12:30. She is available for consultation regarding medical issues, 
prescription questions and blood pressure readings. 
NEWSLETTER 

The Compass is published monthly and contains the monthly menu, activities for the 
coming month, coming events and the latest information of interest to seniors. 
FRIENDS OF THE COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Friends of the Swampscott Council On Aging was formed in February of 1995, and 
continues to lend assistance to the Center. We hope that people will contribute and join the 
Friends Group. 
THANK YOU 

A very special thank you to all who helped make 2002-2003 a successful year. A very 
special thank you to all that volunteer at the Senior Center. Your efforts are greatly appreciated. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Martha L. Marcou 
Executive Director 



76 



TOWN COUNSEL 

In 2002 and the first six months of 2003, Town Counsel responded to a number of requests for 
opinions from Town officials on a wide variety of issues and represented the Town in several pending 
court actions. We advised the Board of Selectmen with respect to numerous zoning appeals, town 
meeting procedure, amendments to bylaws, wetlands issues, custody and management of parkland, site 
plan review procedures, election law issues, procurement and contract issues, and various other general 
municipal matters. 

As always, we strive to provide fast and concise responses to requests for advisory opinions. 
Town Counsel has represented the Town and its officers in judicial proceedings before the District Court, 
Superior Court, Land Court, and the Housing Court. We have also worked hard to provide effective 
representation of the Town in all of the Town's pending litigation. We continue to represent the Town in 
court on various litigation matters, and have successfully defended numerous zoning appeals. 

The office of Town Counsel has continued to work with the Town to reduce municipal legal costs, 
by researching many issues of municipal law and mailing Memoranda addressing those issues at no 
charge to the Town. For example, in the last eighteen months, we have advised the Town with regard to 
drafting local wetlands laws and regulations, the Federal Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2002, the USA 
Patriot Act, marriage license fees, the authority of administrative agents to enter private property, and 
many other timely municipal topics. 

We have attended meetings of the Board of Selectmen and other Town Boards at the Town's 
request, and with permission of the Board of Selectmen, to provide advice on pending litigation and for 
the purposes of risk management. 

Town Counsel's objective continues to be to provide high quality legal services to the Town in a 
responsive and timely manner at a reasonable cost. 

We extend our appreciation to the Board of Selectmen for their confidence in retaining this firm, 
and we appreciate the assistance and cooperation we have received on all matters from the Board of 
Selectmen and other Town Boards and personnel. We look forward to working with members of the 
Swampscott town government in the future. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Leonard Kopelman, for the firm 
of Kopelman and Paige, P.C., 
Town Counsel 



77 



EARTH REMOVAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE (ERAC) 



The ERAC has continued to insist upon quarry modernization at the Aggregate Industry 
Operation on Danvers Road. The ERAC monitors the daily operation of the quarry in regards to 
all activities in the quarry. The ERAC generally handles all complaints and inquiries at the 
Aggregate property. 

The ERAC has been working and pushing Al to update and modernize the plant and 
equipment at the quarry since inception of the by-law in 1994. Using a strong, but fair guiding 
hand over the past few years, we can report that the quarry operation has been perhaps 80% 
modernized with the Primary Crushing operation the last remaining piece of the puzzle. The 
ERAC has negotiated fairly, but firmly. Many meetings have been confrontational with neither 
side wanting to back down. This seems to be a common occurrence in other local communities 
that have quarries located in them. 

Recognizing the size of the operation and understanding the complexity of replacing and 
modernizing a plant of such physical spanning size, the ERAC has worked with Al in directing, 
and sometimes selecting what was going to be done and in what order. For instance; the old 
secondary crusher was located right in the driveway of the old entrance. Crushing, screening, 
and loading of trucks were taking place just 200 feet from the entrance of the facility. Despite 
witnessing some valiant efforts by Al, both physically and financially to rein in the dust problem at 
this major section of plant, Al was unable bring dust containment down to an acceptable level. In 
order for the ERAC to recommend renewal of their permit Al had to relocate and upgrade this 
operation to an area of the quarry, which was further, back from the road, and into the upper part 
of the "hole." This plant has historically operated from the hours of 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM. The 
ERAC; in no uncertain terms has continuously informed Al that the plant and equipment should 
be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 hour work day. The ERAC 
has clearly informed Al that after 2004, rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening 
was not realistic; and that the town and residents will not want to hear this equipment at that 
time of the evening and to be absolutely sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the 
job done during typical construction hours. The ERAC continues to investigate some 
outstanding engineering questions in regards to the secondary plant but is very encouraged by 
the plants operation. The noise level produce by this plant is the measurement in which the 
ERAC shall measure against the new Primary Plant in 2004. 

** The ERAC has stated that should Al be able to conduct operations that would be 
oblivious to the neighbors and residents of Swampscott and Salem, that we would not mind a 24- 
hour operation. "If we can't hear you, we will not know you're there." 

Also over the past year, a modern truck wash station was constructed as agreed and 
operates on a daily basis. The ERAC is extremely pleased with the positive improvement to dust 
and dirt problems that the wash station has produced. 

The primary crusher moves to the bottom by the end of 2004. 

The ERAC has reached the end of a ten-year effort to modernize the operation of the 
quarry. The primary crusher moving to the bottom of the hole is the final piece of the puzzle. But 
first some background on the current primary crusher: The primary crusher is the machine that 
most of the town is hearing. It is a machine that has two gigantic adjustable "jaws." It is also the 
first piece of equipment that the blasted rock is introduced to. Ledge rock is blasted from the face 
of the quarry, and hauled via huge trucks to the "hopper" of the primary plant. The trucks dump 
directly into the hopper and the rock falls into the "jaw" of the crusher. The jaw is set to a 
dimension to reduce the large raw blasted boulders into smaller rocks that are then screened and 
conveyed onto the secondary crushing plant. The primary plant is only one crusher . The 
secondary plant has many smaller crushers and screens that reduce and process the finished 
rock product. An interesting observation of the "jaw" crusher is that is makes less noise and runs 
faster if the raw material being dumped in the hopper is not all large stones. Interesting because 
the blasting technique has a lot to do with the size of the raw material that is dumped into the 
hopper. A lesser and maybe weaker "blast" seems to produce much larger raw material. This 
larger raw material dumped into the hopper of the "jaw" make the "jaw" work that much harder, 
and is that much louder. Improved blasting techniques, as well as a new blasting contractor 



78 



seem to have reduced the amount or larger rocks that go through the crusher as well as the 
blasting readings and complaints have diminished substantially over the past 7 years. 

The ERAC has worked to place the primary crusher in bottom of the hole for several 
reasons: 

1 . Noise. The hope is that noise will be reduced to the level of the secondary crushing 
plant. This is the standard that we have talked about for the past several years. In 1997, before 
the secondary plant was replaced, the ERAC, in conjunction with former superintendent Marty 
McKenney, and Bardon Trimount noise engineer Mike Nutting, conducted several tests at various 
locations. We stood at the corner of Nichols and Martin road, the top of Overhill road, and at the 
intersection of Eastman and Minerva. 

With no measuring equipment set up, we conducted the following simple test: first we listened as 
the entire plant operated at full capacity. Marty then radioed the plant and had the secondary 
plant shut down. We noticed no change in the amount of noise. Next Marty radioed to run the 
secondary plant again, and this time shut down the primary plant, the "jaw." There was virtually 
no noise with the secondary plant running and the primary plant off. We performed this test 
at the other locations and heard the same results. This is to be the test for the new primary 
plant . In order to maintain the existing historical hours of operation, Bardon Trimount would have 
to reach the noise level of that when the secondary crusher is running by itsel f. No measure of 
decibels; a simple test of the naked ear . It is Dan Dandreo's contention that the new plant will 
not be able to be achieved these noise levels even with the new primary crushing plant in place, 
which is why new capacity is so important. 

2. Capacity. The ERAC, concerned that noise reduction goals cannot be met, has 
continuously insisted that the new primary crusher is sized properly to ensure needed and 
contract production can be met within a 10-12 hour workday. ." This plant has historically 
operated from the hours of 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. The ERAC; in no uncertain terms has 
continuously informed Al that the plant and equipment should be sized properly to meet all their 
production needs within a 10-12 hour work day. The ERAC has clearly informed Al that after 
2004, rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic; and that the town and 
residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening and to be absolutely sure 
that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done during typical construction hours. 

3. Dust. The ERAC is optimistic that by placing the Primary Crusher deeper into the hole 
will reduce the dust from escaping the rim of the quarry because the dust will have to travel much 
further to leave the property. In addition, there appears to be several "foaming" products that are 
available that may be able to be adapted to the plant equipment to further reduce dust before it 
becomes airborne. 

Closing thought. Moving the primary crusher to the bottom of the hole by no means 
guarantees that all will be well at the end of 2004. By the end of 2004-2005, it appears that the 
quarry operation will be fully modernized. The Town of Swampscott, the City of Salem, and the 
quarry may be at a crossroad. Should the quarry, after ten years of intense modernization, not be 
able to reduce noise, dust and truck traffic to level's which allow it to co-exist with its neighbors, 
and not be able to reach and follow requirements out lined under the bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott, the realization that a quarry of such magnitude just cannot fit in such a tight 
populated area may have to be made. Perhaps a new use of the land along the lines of the now 
closed Rowe quarry in Revere, or the Innis quarry in Danvers may indeed be the most 
appropriate use of the property. 



79 



ELECTION COMMISSION 

Linda J. Thompson, Chairman 
Barbara Devereux 
Edward Golden 
Paul Debole 

The Election Commission met on a regular basic for their monthly meetings. Much of the 
discussion was geared to the planning and scheduling of three scheduled and 1 special election. 
Two scheduled elections were on the State level, one scheduled Town Election and one special 
Town Election were also held. The first State Election was the State Primary on September 17, 
2002, a total of 3,376 registered voters, 27%, voted. The results are as follows: 



Democratic Primary top vote getters: 



OFFICE 


CANDIDATE 


TOTAL VOTES 


Congress 


John F. Kerry 


2,202 


Governor 


Robert B. Reich 


1,011 


Lieutenant Governor 


John P. Slattery 


833 


Attorney General 


Thomas F. Reilly 


1,917 


Secretary of State 


William Francis Galvin 


1,830 


Treasurer 


Michael P. Cahill 


686 


Auditor 


A. Joseph DeNucci 


1,719 


Representative in Congress 


John F. Tierney 


2,086 


Councilor 


Mary-Ellen Manning 


1,041 


Senator in General Court 


Thomas M. McGee 


1,932 


Representative in General Court 


Douglas W. Petersen 


1,968 


District Attorney 


Jonathan W. Blodgett 


1,280 


Register of Probate 


Pamela Casey O'Brien 


1,715 


Republican Primary top vote getters: 






Governor 


Mitt Romney 


663 


Lieutenant Governor 


Kerry Murphy Healey 


495 


Secretary of State 


Jack E. Robinson, III 


307 


Treasurer 


Daniel A. Grabauskas 


369 


Representative in Congress 


Mark C. Smith 


402 


Green Party Primary top vote getters: 






Lieutenant Governor 


Anthony F. Lorenzen 


2 


Treasurer 


James O'Keefe 


2 


Libertarian Primary top vote getters: 






Senator in Congress 


Michael E. Cloud 


2 


Governor 


Carla A. Howell 


2 


Lieutenant Governor 


Richard P. Aucoin 


2 


The State Election was held on November 5, 2003, a total of 6,548 registered voters, 66°/ 


The results are as follows: 






Senator in Congress 


John F. Kerry 


4,980 


Governor & 


Mitt Romney 




Lieutenant Governor 


Kerry Murphy Healey 


3,438 


Attorney General 


Thomas F. Reilly 


4,758 


Secretary of State 


William Francis Galvin 


4,558 


Treasurer 


Timothy P. Cahill 


3,134 


Auditor 


A. Joseph DeNucci 


4,561 


Representative in Congress 


John F. Tierney 


4,774 


Councilor 


Mary-Ellen Manning 


4,139 


Senator in General Court 


Thomas. M. McGee 


4,665 


Representative in General Court 


Douglas W. Petersen 


4,787 


District Attorney 


Jonathan W. Blodgett 


4,511 



Register of Probate Pamela Casey O'Brien 4,325 

Newly appointed Election Commissioner Paul Debole was welcomed at the November 5, 2002 
meeting. Paul was appointed to replace retired Commissioner Joseph Sinatra. 

A special Election was conducted on December 10, 2002 for an override of prop 2 Vz 



80 



for a new high school. The question presented to the voters was as follows: 
"Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition 
two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued for the 
purpose of planning, designing, constructing and furnishing a High School on Essex 
Street at the current site of Jackson park, fields and recreational facilities on the so-called 
"Aggregate easement" site, and fields and recreational facilities on the so-called "Tedesco 
easement" site. Yes No." A total of 5,462 registered voters, 55%, voted. The results were 
as follows: Yes 2,843 No 2,619 

The annual Town Election was held on April 29, 2003. A total of 2,659 registered voters, 
27%, voted. The newly elected officials are as follows: 

OFFICE CANIDATE TOTAL VOTES 



Moderator 


Martin C. Goldman 


1,607 


Board of Selectmen 


William (Bill) Hyde Sr. 


1,390 


School Committee 


Philip Rotner 


1,626 


Board of Assessors 


John V. Phelan III 


1,616 


Planning Board 5-year term 


Eugene (Gene)Barden 


1,571 


Planning Board 1 -year term 


Richard Mcintosh 


1,511 


Board of Health 


Nelson Kessler 


1,558 


Housing Authority 


Patricia Krippendorf 


1,179 


Library Trustee 


John R. Karwowski 


1,204 



Thanks to the many Poll Workers, School, Church, Town Hall Custodians, and the Police 
Department who helped with the elections. 

The annual Town Wide Census saw Swampscott with 8,802 active voters, 842 inactive voters, 
and 3,798 non-voters for a total of 13,442 residents. 

Calendar year 2004 will bring on four scheduled elections, the Presidential Primaries, Annual 
Town Election, State Primary, and the General Election. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Linda J. Thompson 
Chairman 



81 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Bruce Gordon, Director 

Chief Laurence Galante, Deputy Director 

Chief Ronald Madigan, Deputy Director 

The Swampscott Emergency Management Agency continues to work on protecting the 
people and assets of Swampscott during an emergency. The role of the Agency is to bring 
resources into Swampscott when the capabilities of the Town have been exceeded. The Town 
has a Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan that is constantly being updated to keep it 
current. 

Over the last year we were able to obtain radiological monitoring equipment to better 
equip our police and fire departments. We also obtained a supply of Potassium Iodide to protect 
our first responders in the event of an exposure. We have been working with the high school 
building committee to designate the new high school as our primary shelter when it is completed, 
making sure adequate resources will be available to us. We have attended several training 
conferences throughout the year. We work closely with the police, fire, dpw, health, and 
Selectmen to insure their needs and concerns are met whenever possible. The Agency receives 
constant briefings from state and federal agencies in the areas of intelligence and threats and we 
adjust our own response levels accordingly. The Agency received a planning grant and we will 
use this to further update and refine our plans. 

This coming year we hope to enhance our communications capabilities by providing 
backup and remote site capabilities. We will continue to develop resources and enhance training 
throughout the Town and with our first responders. We encourage all residents to check Town 
Hall for a variety of publications provided by various agencies. They offer a variety of excellent 
information in areas such as health and preparedness 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Chief Galante and Chief Madigan for their 
ongoing assistance and cooperation. I could not perform the job without it. Silvio Baruzzi and 
James Marrotta from DPW and Health are true professionals and provide guidance and direction 
as well as any assistance they and their department can provide. June Blake, our Health Nurse is 
a wealth of information in all health related issues we have had and makes our job much easier in 
assessing the various threats. I would like to thank the residents through their support at Town 
Meeting as well as the volunteers that have come forward to offer their assistance. 

I would urge residents to prepare themselves for emergencies. Stay current with news 
and events. During hurricane and winter pay particular attention to the warnings issued and follow 
them. Maintain your own "shelter" - have extra food and water, flashlights, batteries and portable 
radios, warm clothing and blankets, prescriptions and gas for your car. These are common sense 
items that we need to have all the time because of where we live. Monitor your neighbors, 
especially the seniors and lend a hand when necessary. 



82 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the fire department is to respond to the needs of the community in the areas of 
fire protection, emergency medical care, public assistance and code enforcement. I feel that we did an 
admirable job proving these services to the people of Swampscott in the past year. 

During the fiscal year July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003 we answered 1889 calls for assistance. 
This included 19 fires involving structures, 37 fires in buildings where the building itself was not involved 
and 54 fires not involving buildings. Medical assists, and motor vehicle accidents with injuries 
accounted for 861 responses while other incidents made up the remaining 918 calls. Requests for 
medical assistance continue to be our single biggest response. We continually upgrade our medical 
equipment and training to better serve the community. Every piece of fire apparatus carries a complete 
array of medical equipment including state of the art defibrillators. Our Engine 21 is now a licensed non- 
transporting ambulance and as such carries all the same equipment as an ambulance except for the 
stretcher. Our cars carry medical equipment and are able to respond to medical calls along with the 
apparatus. I hope to add defibrillators to these vehicles in the near future. 

We have a contracted ambulance service with Action Ambulance Company and they provide 
Advanced Life Support Ambulance service to the town under the control of the fire chief. This two-tiered 
system has served the community well. Our average response time to medical emergencies is still 
under four minutes about 90% of the time. 
PERSONNEL 

The past year has seen significant turnover of personnel as many of the people that were added 
during the expansion of the department in the early 1970's are reaching retirement age. In addition the 
town passed an early retirement incentive that allowed three members to retire early. 

During the past year we had six members retire. They were Capt. David Lynch, and firefighters 
Carl Bates, C. Daniel Barry, Charles Owens, Francis Dube and Francis Delano. Firefighter Delano 
retired with 43 years of service. 

We appointed to the department new firefighters Richard Blake, Mark Ryan, Anthony Pierro, 
Brian Crescenzo and Christopher Caruso. The following promotions took place: 

Lt Graham Archer to Captain and assigned as Division 4 commander 

Lt David Fessenden to Captain and assigned to fire prevention 

Firefighter John Quinn to Lieutenant and assigned to Division 2 

Firefighter Kevin Breen to Lieutenant and assigned to Training and Operations 

Our number of Emergency Medical Technicians has continued to grow and currently we have 
32 members who maintain this level of training 
FIRE PREVENTION AND EDUCATION 

We annually inspect all commercial establishments and residences of three or more families. In 
addition all mandatory inspections and fire drills were conducted in accordance to Massachusetts law. 
We also inspected all single-family homes that were either sold or subject to new mortgage, which is 
also a requirement of law. 

The fire prevention office conducted many of these inspections and has been actively pursuing 
an increased level of code enforcement and public fire safety awareness. In conjunction with the fire 
prevention office our two Student Awareness of Fire Education (S.A.F.E.) instructors, Remo Zimbaldi 
and Sheila Scranton have continued to provide fire safety education in the middle school. The S.A.F.E. 
program is a state funded grant program and while the amount of funds has been reduced we have 
continued to provide this educational program. It is my intention to continue to do so regardless of 
funding, as I feel that the fire prevention message needs to reach our young. 

This year marked our tenth year of fire prevention week open house. The event is enjoyed by 
kindergarten, first and second graders as well as by the firefighters who participate. 

We also conducted a public safety day in conjunction with the Swampscott Police Department. 

Both of these events would not be possible without the support of local merchants who donate 
food and supplies. We are indebted to them. 
APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

The condition of our primary engine is excellent, however our ever-increasing call volume 
continues to take its toll in increased maintenance costs. Our second engine is beginning to show its 14 
years of age and is scheduled for replacement in 2005. We have gone out to bid on a new aerial ladder 



83 



to replace our current 1982 vehicle and we anticipate taking delivery of a new truck in the spring of 
2004. It certainly will be a timely replacement 

Much of our out of date smaller tools and equipment have been replaced over the past two 
years thanks to grants secured from the Commonwealth. To date we have applied for and received 
over $40,000 in equipment grants in the two year period. These grants have been a tremendous help in 
keeping our equipment state of the art. 
THE FUTURE 

The current fiscal climate is taking its toll of the fire service as city fire departments reduce staff. 
We have been fortunate in Swampscott to have avoided this for the coming fiscal year, primarily due to 
good fiscal management on the part of town government. Unfortunately for smaller communities we do 
not have the large amount of public safety resources to be able to cut staff in difficult times and still 
deliver services. As fire chief it is my intent to be able to always provide the community with the best 
possible service level. 
Laurence J. Galante 
Chief of Department 



84 



HARBOR ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

William F. Hennessey, Chairman 

Lawrence P. Bithell Peter C. McCarnston 

Geralyn P.M. Falco John J. O'Shea 

Michael Gambale 

During Swampscott's fiscal year 2003, the Harbor Advisory Committee met three times for the purpose 
of discussing various matters of significance to the waterfront. In contrast to the previous year, many 
waterfront related issues arose which, in the estimation of Harbor Advisory Committee members, merit 
attention and action. 

In September of 2002, the fuel line extending from the foot of the Town Pier to the end of the pier 
used by Swampscott fishermen was condemned and shut down by the State Fire Marshal. This line, having 
been in place and functioning flawlessly for more than a decade, is now no longer available to our fishing 
fleet as a means by which to bring fuel to their vessels. The problem with the State Fire Marshal lies in the 
fact that the fuel line does not conform to standards recently established then codified into current 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Regulations. 

Because of this action, our local fishermen are now forced to implement alternatives for fueling their 
boats which turn out to be inefficient, environmentally tenuous, or both. Most fishermen now transport their 
fuel in "jerry jugs" from shore to their vessels via small prams. Alternatively, they now have to travel to 
marinas in Lynn or in Marblehead for fuel. This alternative adds literally hours to their work day and results in 
significant fuel burn just going the extra distance for fuel, then having to travel back to port here in 
Swampscott. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee plans to work with the Swampscott Fishermen's Alliance along with 
the Swampscott Fire Department and other cognizant agencies with a view toward bringing the fuel line into 
compliance with current state regulations. 

Fiscal Year 2003 saw the up cropping of several deficiencies in and around Swampscott Harbor. 
A total of fourteen issues were identified and called to the attention of the Town Administrator and to the 
Superintendent of Public Works. Priorities for remedial action were established with the anticipation that all 
deficiencies shall be addressed. Those specific issues, not enumerated in this report, are available in Harbor 
Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes from the office of the Town Clerk should citizens desire those details. 

The Selectmen and the Town Administrator appointed members of the Harbor Advisory Committee 
for their expertise and special interest in matters associated with the waterfront. We appreciate the 
opportunity to serve the community in this special way, for it is our harbor, our beaches, and our boaters, 
both commercial and pleasure, which most greatly define the history and character of Swampscott. With 
open space in the town shrinking nearly by the minute, the sea offers this community its greatest measure of 
open space. We must therefore take special care of this precious resource to include our National Historic 
Landmark Fish House, which has fallen into serious disrepair in recent years. In the opinion of the Harbor 
Advisory Committee, the Fish House should be to Swampscott what Motif Number 1 is to Rockport, a focal 
point and source of pride within the community. 

While the Harbor Advisory Committee does attempt to be both vigilant and proactive with respect to 
matters involving the waterfront, we earnestly solicit input from all citizens, for good ideas are always 
welcome. We are honored to serve and hope that our efforts are of benefit to our wonderful seaside 
community and to all of its residents. 
Respectfully submitted, 
William F. Hennessey 
Chairman 



85 



HARBORMASTER'S DEPARTMENT 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 
Assistant Harbormasters 
Roger Bruley John Cawley 

Roger Carroll William Hennessey 

Harris Tibbetts 

In stark contrast to the previous year, the year 2002 season featured weekends with less than ides 
boating weather. It nevertheless was successful in that there were no serious incidents involving either boater 
or their vessels. This no doubt, is a corollary to proactive attention paid with respect to safety issues involving 
mooring equipment and the proper operation of vessels upon Swampscott waters. The goal, as always, is ti 
assist boaters in ways that prevent difficulties from occurring in the first place. 

The number of boats moored in Swampscott Harbor remained stable in 2002 at slightly in excess of tw 
hundred. This turns out to be beneficial since, although very limited additional mooring space remains in tr> 
harbor, shore-side resources continue to be severely strained primarily due to inadequate parking in the area. 
In addition, decreasing depth throughout the harbor poses new problems. This is particularly limiting for large 
vessels especially deep-keeled sailboats. We note also that the ratio of sail to powerboats is changing witl 
sailboats gaining in popularity. This may be reflective of the extremely high cost of fuel, personal preferences 
or a combination of both. Sailboats must therefore be moored farther out into the bay where they are subject t< 
greater risk in severe storms or heavy seas. Benefits of a dredging project such as that undertaken in ou 
harbor nine years ago are largely temporary for, at best, when a hole is dug in the ocean floor, Mother Natun 
seems always to want to fill the hole back in. These are but some of the realities with which you 
Harbormaster's Department must deal. We may thus have to deny certain vessels access to mooring spaa 
here for we shall not permit a boat to be moored in an unsafe manner or location. 

The Town Pier, floats, and the launch ramp continue to serve the community well despite som< 
maintenance issues, which must be addressed from time to time. The launch service provided by thi 
Swampscott Yacht Club continues to permit boaters to access their vessels in a convenient and safe mannei 
This service, provided by the S.Y.C. to the Harbormaster and Assistants Harbormasters at no cost to the Town 
contributes greatly to the efficiency of the department as well. The Swampscott Yacht Club's very presence ii 
the Fish House at the foot of the Town Pier has, for the past seventy years, been a fundamental and essentie 
element in terms of providing viability to the area as a boating center. 

In 2002, the Harbormaster's Department continued to cooperate with other Town Departments in th< 
fulfillment of their missions. We assisted the Recreation Commission by overseeing the placement c 
designated swim markers along town beaches. Further assistance was extended to the Recreation Commissioi 
in the placement of moorings for the Youth Sailing Program. We provide pump-out service to the Sailini 
Program vessels after storms, and generally, kept an eye on the youngsters as they sail about the bay. 

During the past three years, we have worked closely with the Health Agent providing him with week! 
assistance by transporting him to seven town beaches for state and town mandated water purity testing 
Approaching these beaches by water as opposed to the previous sampling method which involved the agent' 
donning cumbersome hip boots then wading out into the surf from land, saves the Health Agent a minimum c 
five hours per week throughout the summer and provides for a more consistent and reliable testing process 
This assistance to the Health Department is provided by Assistant Harbormasters on a volunteer basis at n 
cost to the Town. 

The town boat has achieved its twentieth year of service and is fast approaching the end of its useful lif' 
as an emergency vessel. Despite great care taken over the many years, the boat has been worked hard and 
is simply wearing out. It should be noted that the Harbormaster, the Assistant Harbormasters, and others hav< 
performed the preponderance of maintenance over the years on a volunteer basis on their own time at no cos 
to the Town. We are in the process of developing a specification for a new boat and are working with the Tow 
Administrator and the Capital Improvement Committee with a view toward obtaining a new boat to replace th< 
present one which has served the community so well for so long. 

Your Harbormaster and Assistant Harbormasters continue to be very active in the North Shore 
Harbormasters Association. This organization is comprised of Harbormaster's Departments from Wmthrop 
to Salisbury and all coastal communities in between. As in previous years, we participated in essential trainin; 
programs designed to enhance our competence and readiness to better serve the boaters of Swampscoti 
Because of our active involvement in this organization, a Swampscott student is eligible to compete for i 
$500.00 college scholarship sponsored by the North Shore Harbormasters Association. Those having interne 
access may wish to log on to the N.S.H.A. web site, www.harbormasters.org where the Swampscot 



86 



Harbormaster's Department maintains a page. The web site contains much valuable information for boaters 
navigating throughout the north shore. Of interest too might be the Swampscott Yacht Club web site, 
www.svccompass.com for information attuned even more locally. 

The mission of the Swampscott Harbormaster's Department remains a mission totally oriented to 
the community. We strive to accomplish our mission in a user-friendly, professional and cost efficient manner 
while enforcing local, state, and federal regulations within our jurisdiction. Managing the mooring permit system 
remains a very important aspect of our responsibilities. The public safety aspect of our duties has, especially 
since 91 1 , taken on even greater significance since Homeland Security responsibilities have greatly diminished 
the roll of the United States Coast Guard in some of the more routine elements of boater safety. We are the 
primary responders for the rescue of people and disabled vessels as these situations arise on Swampscott 
waters. 

To be successful in accomplishing the department's mission, cooperation of many individuals, 
organizations, and boards is essential. We therefore extend our appreciation to Town Meeting, to the Finance 
Committee, to the Board of Selectmen, to the Department of Public Works, to the Police and Fire Departments, 
and to the Swampscott Yacht Club for the use of their launch service and other considerations. To the Town 
Clerk and staff for their considerable assistance, especially with the mooring permit system, thank you very 
much. Special appreciation is extended to the Assistant Harbormasters who devote so much time on a 
voluntary basis, for our mission could not be accomplished without these dedicated individuals. To the boaters 
whom we serve, we appreciate your cooperation and good will, for it is you who ultimately make boating such a 
wholesome and pleasurable pastime here in Swampscott. 

Finally, we look forward to working with our new Town Administrator on matters of interest and 
importance to the boaters of our community for it is after all our waterfront that so greatly defines the character 
of Swampscott. Indeed, many have speculated that, without our waterfront, Swampscott might be just another 
town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence P. Bithell William F. Hennessey 

Swampscott Harbormaster Assistant Harbormaster 



87 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Nelson Kessler, Chairman of the Board of Health, July 2002 through May 2003 
Dr. Larry Block, Chairman of the Board of Health, May 2003 through present. 
Dr. Martha Pitman 

The Board of Health has been committed to promoting health and well being for the residents of 
Swampscott. The Board of Health continues to value the importance of educating residents in many 
areas of public health and safety. As well, the Health Department works with many other departments 
and communities to ensure a sound environment. 
TRASH & RECYCLING 

Trash and recycling is the largest part of the Board of Health's day-to-day operation. The Health 
Department deals with multiple phone calls and complaints many of which need to be investigated before 
they can be resolved. This past year we focused on negotiating anew rubbish and recycling contract. 
Our recycling contracts, as well as the rubbish contract, will be with Northside Carting, Inc. and DeRosa 
Landfill Management for Schools and Municipal buildings. Recycling continues under the direction of the 
Recycling Committee, as well as the chairman of recycling, Nelson Kessler. This year showed an 
increase in recycling tonnage collected by sixty-two point thirty-five tons (62.35). The Board urges all 
Swampscott residents to recycle more diligently as it is beneficial to the town, both ecologically and 
economically. 

The trash fee was eradicated with the passing of the Charter Change. As in previous years, the town's 
contract with Waste Management states there is a limit on the amount of trash disposed per household 
each week. This limit includes four (4) barrels of thirty-gallon (30) capacity or eight (8) bags also of thirty- 
gallon (30) capacity. Christmas trees and extra Christmas trash is included in this limit. Our trash tonnage 
decreased by approximately one hundred eighty point ninety-eight (180.98) tons. 

Our contract with Northside Carting has provisions for increased limits and bulk items. There will 
be a drop-off area at the Department of Public Works yard on Paradise Road for the disposal of white 
goods (i.e.: washing machines, dryers, hot water heaters) and light clean iron only . This will be different 
from the past metal drop-off days as we will not accept mixed materials. For example: bicycles must 
have all rubber tires and plastic removed before disposal. We will NOT accept any refrigerators, freezers, 
air conditioners or microwave ovens. This is very important. Any materials that are not deemed 
recyclable will be returned to the Town of Swampscott and cost the taxpayers to dispose of it in an 
alternative way. If this system is abused it will be terminated. 

In the past year, the Board of Health sponsored six (6) white metal drop-offs and one (1) Cathode 
Ray Tube (CRT). We collected a total of two hundred and thirty-nine (239) televisions, as well as other 
electronic devices. The 2003 hazardous waste drop-off was conducted with Clean Harbors for the 
residents of Swampscott. In 2003, hazardous waste drop-off was held in conjunction with the Nahant 
Board of Health for both communities. We accepted sixty-five (65) carloads of waste products. There 
were six (6) curbside leaf pickups. Also, the residents wishing to dispose of yard waste could buy a sticker 
through the Department of Public Works for twenty-five dollars ($25.00) and bring their leaves and grass 
clipping up to the Northside Carting facility on Swampscott Road. 
RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 

The Director of the Health Department, James Marotta hired Food Inspector, Sharon McCabe in 
January of 2003. Together they conduct bi-annual restaurant inspections in May and, then again, in 
December. This includes seventy (70) establishments in the Town of Swampscott. If a restaurant fails, 
Mr. Marotta or Ms. McCabe would make follow-up visits until that establishment was in compliance with 
the State Health and Sanitary codes. Yearly, after the May inspections, the Health Department sends out 
approximately three hundred (300) permits to these establishments. Each permit must be handwritten 
and some establishments can have as many as seven (7) permits issued. 
BEACH TESTING 

Beach testing is performed weekly. We have seven (7) beaches that are required to be tested 
throughout the summer. There were no beaches closed in 2002. 

Beach testing began again on June 11, 2003. The Board of Health asked the Department of 
Public Works to continue to post cautionary signs at all the outflow pipes on all the beaches which read: 
"Caution. Water flowing from this pipe may be unsafe for human contact. Do not play or swim near out 
flow." The Board is concerned that the outflow water contains bacteria that could be harmful when 
children or pets wade or play in the shallow pools that form. 



88 



The Board of Health wants to extend its sincere appreciation to Harbormaster, Larry Bithell, and 
his staff for assisting the Board of Health with beach inspections. 
EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE 

In July of 2002, James Marotta, Director of Public Health was called by the Police Department for 
a possible Anthrax case. Fortunately, the material was tested at the State Laboratory and determined to 
be negative for anthrax. 

On July 20, 2002, Mr. Marotta was called to Friendly's Ice Cream where an employee mixed 
chemicals in a sink and cause noxious fumes/gases (cyanide). 

In January 2003, James Marotta, Director of Public Health was called by the Police Department 
to respond to the death of an elderly woman who froze in her own home. This tragedy prompted the 
implementation of a program spearheaded by the Police Department, Council on Aging, Fire Department 
and Action Ambulance entitled R U OK?. This system monitors the safety of the elderly citizens in 
Swampscott. Seniors register for the program and receive a daily phone call via computer that instructs 
them how to respond. If there is no response the computer calls again. The police will be dispatched if 
there is no response on the second call. 

As a result of the publicity this program generated, many elderly citizens called the Greater Lynn 
Senior Services (GLSS) stating that they are going without food. This led to the formation of a committee 
that started a food pantry. The food is distributed monthly from various locations. 

On January 27, 2003, James Marotta received a call of a sewer backup at the kitchen area of the 
Middle School cafeteria. When he arrived there was approximately %" of water on the floor. 
Mr. Marotta met with Dan Cahill, Electrical Inspector, and together they waited for the plumber and ASAP 
Drain Company to arrive. They arrived within twenty (20) minutes and all went to room #8 where the 
sewer line trap is located. The gentleman from ASAP lifted the steel cover to the trap. As he removed 
the cap off the sewer line, water and raw sewerage came gushing out. At that point they were convinced 
that the water on the cafeteria floor was the same. 

Mr. Marotta then ordered the school to be closed until the area was sanitized. Dr. Brian Coughlin, 
Superintendent of Schools, was notified. He agreed that the school should be closed. The Department 
of Public Works came to assist in clearing the sewer line. Andrew Maylor was also notified. 
On January 28, 2003, Mr. Marotta returned to the school. The DPW repaired the line that was broken. 
When the repair was complete the line was cleared. The school was sanitized and reopened the 
following day. 

In June 2003, a bacterial meningitis case was reported at the preschool of the Temple Beth El. 
Proper procedures were followed to stop the spread of the disease. Approximately one hundred (1 00) 
people were notified of their possible exposure. No further cases transpired. 
CLINICS 
INFLUENZA 

The Board of Health conducted three (3) public flu clinics this past year. These clinics were held 
at Temple Beth El (2) and Senior Center (1). Our Public Health Nurse, June Blake, R.N. along with 
several volunteer nurses were able to immunize approximately one thousand ninety (1090) individuals. 
The flu clinics were very successful due to the many volunteers that came forward to participate. We 
want to thank Rabbi Weinsberg and Martha Marcou for the use of their facilities. We would also like to 
thank June Blake, R.N. (Public Health Nurse) for preparing all flu clinics for the town of Swampscott. The 
public health nurse billed all senior health plans for the administration costs and collected a total of two 
thousand five hundred fifty-three dollars and thirty-five cents (2553.35) 

The Health Department thanked the volunteers of the flu clinics with a luncheon. We appreciate 
their support and commitment. 
BLOOD PRESSURE 

As in previous years, the nurse performed twelve (12) blood pressure clinics at the Senior Center. 
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

Our Public Health Nurse tracked all communicable diseases in the town, watching closely for any 
clusters or outbreaks. 
MENINGITIS 

In the past year, the meningitis program continued for all our high school seniors. We offered 
meningitis shots for all seniors interested and have held our third clinic on May 14, 2003. We immunized 
eight (8) students and educated many more. We continue to educate individuals on the disease of and 
immunization for meningitis. 



89 



IMMUNIZATIONS 
DISPENSEMENT 

Each month the public health nurse must travel to Tewksbury State Hospital for the 
Massachusetts Public Health Nurses meeting. At this time she also picks up any immunizations that will 
be needed by the doctors in the Town of Swampscott. The public health nurse logs in the lot numbers 
and expiration dates and dispenses the medications as needed. This includes all of the flu vaccine 
immunizations that the doctors are allotted by the State of Massachusetts. It is also the responsibility of 
the public health nurse to account for all the vaccinations that are returned by the doctors for any reason. 
These medications must then be returned to Tewksbury State Hospital. 
HEPATITIS B 

Hepatitis B vaccines continue for eligible town employees. Each new town worker for the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and School Department may choose to 
be immunized against Hepatitis B. This is recommended especially for first responders who would be 
more at risk. Several employees were immunized in the past twelve months. 
TUBERCULOSIS 

Each new school employee must be tested for tuberculosis. The State of Massachusetts no 
longer supplies the serum; therefore, through the Public Health Nurse, the school department orders 
serum directly from the drug company. June Blake, RN, then plants the tests and reads the results three 
days later. This has been quite a convenience to the new employees who may not have the time to visit 
their primary care physicians. 

The Public Health Nurse also tested Fifty (50) Bertram House employees. The Bertram House 
purchased the solution and supplies. 
MELANOMA GRANT 

The Health Department applied for the annual (Ban the Burn) grant offered by the State of 
Massachusetts. However, due to budget cuts and the fact that Swampscott has received this grant in 
previous years, we were denied. The Health Department, in conjunction with the parks and recreation 
department, were able to continue the program by providing individuals with sun safety facts when 
residents came in to purchase a beach sticker. We provided each resident with free literature provided by 
the State. We want to thank Barbara Rafferty, Bill Busch and Connie Hayes for helping out in this joint 
effort. 

CAMP INSPECTIONS 

On March 18, 2003, the Director of Public Health and the Public Health Nurse attended a camp 
inspection meeting in Chelsea, MA to prepare for the inspection of the summer camps. The State has 
changed many rules and requirements in the inspection of camps. On April 9, 2003, a meeting was held 
in Salem for all local camps in the surrounding towns to explain the many changes. 

In June of each year, the Director and Public Health Nurse inspected seven (7) summer camps for 
the purpose of meeting the regulations developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
local rules. This is another state required mandate that must be done for the safety of our children. This 
inspection included a thorough investigation of the campsite to insure that the environment was safe for 
the attending children. 

• Safe structures and equipment 

• Sanitary facilities 

• Adequate supervision of the campers at all times 

• Plans and protocols in place for medical emergencies, including medicine administration, 
natural and physical disasters 

• Sufficient health care coverage 

• Injury and fire prevention protocols 

• CORI and SORI checks for all employees 

• To ensure that there is a health supervisor on site over the age of eighteen (18) who knows first 
aid and CPR 

• Up to date immunization records for staff and campers 
A MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD OF HEALTH COLUMN 

The Board of Health Nurse continues to print columns on pertinent health issues and concerns. 
These articles included: 
• Melanoma 



90 



• Influenza 

• West Nile Virus 

• Osteoporosis 

Dr. Block wrote a summary of the "Toxic Management: Growing Up Healthy In A Toxic World" 
event which appeared in the Swampscott Reporter entitled What Did We Learn? . Dr. Block is 
considering speaking with school officials to bring this information to the Environmental Science 
classes at the High School and possibly present the talk to the teachers as well. He feels that this 
effort will promote public awareness with the hope of developing a new Organic Pest Management 
Committee. 

Other articles written by Dr. Lawrence S. Block for publication in the Swampscott Reporter 
include: Health Board favors "Organic" approach to West Nile Virus , 
REGULATIONS 

On May 8, 2003 the Board of Health revised the regulations for Rubbish and Recycling Collection 
and Disposal. These regulations were published at the end of June to coincide with the July 1, 2003 
transition of the rubbish and recycling contract. 

The Health Department established a proper procedure regulation to protect the public health 
during the demolition of buildings. This protocol is being endorsed by the Building Department as well. 

The Board of Health addressed the issue of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 
(HIPPA) regarding rights to patient privacy and has taken steps to be in compliance with the State. 
LECTURES 

On September 18, 2002, the Clean Air North organization asked Dr. Larry Block to be a panelist 
on a local cable access televised meeting to discuss the initiation of a Pesticide Awareness Committee in 
Salem, MA. Dr. Block saw that 46% of the State Senators are involved in the communities where Boards 
of Health are working for clean air and smoking bans. 

Dr. Block planned two (2) forums, one on West Nile virus and the other on pesticides, to be 
presented in January. 

The West Nile forum had speakers that represented both sides of the issue such as, Walter 
Montgomery of the Northeast Massachusetts Mosquito Control and Wetland Management District, along 
with two (2) other speakers, a Public Health official and doctor of infectious disease. These speakers 
received a fee to speak. There are ten (10) other Boards of Health that participated and shared the 
expenses 

The West Nile virus forum was held at the Senior Center in Beverly, Massachusetts on January 
9 th , 2003. 

The "Toxic Management: Growing Up Healthy In A Toxic World" seminar was very well attended 
with approximately two hundred (200) people present. The event was held at the Davenport Conference 
Center in the Salem Hospital on Thursday, January 23, 2003, in conjunction with Pesticide Awareness 
Committees, Health Link, the Greater Boston Physicians for Social Responsibility, the Marblehead 
League of Women Voters and the Pediatric Health Care Associations. 

James Marotta, Director of Public Health spoke to the Manchester by the Sea Board of Health on 
smoking regulations. Manchester by the Sea is trying to design smoking regulations and asked Mr 
Marotta for his input. 

MONTHLY HEALTH EDUCATION FOR MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES 

The Swampscott Board of Health was nominated for the "most innovative town" by MIIA. 
Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA) offers the town a budget of six thousand dollars 
($6,000.00) for health education. June Blake developed monthly health programs for municipal 
employees. We provided the following programs this year 

• Therapeutic Chair Massage 

• Six (6) weeks yoga series 

• "Get It Off-Keep It Off'. An eight (8) week weight reduction and maintenance series directed by 
a dietitian. 

• Healthy cooking program held at the Fire Department with a guest chef. 

• "Avoiding the Holiday Bulge" 

• Make Every Step Count" pedometer walking program 

• Health 2003 a 12 month self-run exercise program 



91 



This program will continue into next year. We want to thank Jane Cassidy, RN, Nancy Lord, 
Personnel Manager and Claire Allemian, Wellness Director (MIIA), as well as her staff, for their 
assistance in this program. We would also like to thank the Fire Chief, Larry Galante and his staff for the 
use of their kitchen facilities. 
WEST NILE VIRUS PROTOCOL 

The Board of Health continues to support the West Nile protocol, which was developed in 
conjunction with the Pesticide Awareness Committee and North East Mosquito Control and Wetlands 
Management District. The Swampscott Board of Health is also investigating other methods of combating 
the mosquito problem that will be safe for the environment and residents of Swampscott. 
ANIMAL TESTING 

Periodically, the Board of Health receives telephone calls regarding dead animals. Generally, the 
Health Department will dispatch Philip Whitten to dispose of them. On occasions, when the species is a 
bird and seemingly dead less than twenty-four (24) hours, the Health Department will submit the bird to 
the Massachusetts State Laboratory for testing of West Nile Virus disease. In the past year, we had one 
(1) bird submitted for testing which had positive results for West Nile Virus. The Board would like to 
thank Philip Whitten for his many years of dedicated service. 

The Health Department would like to welcome Isabel Lorenco as Animal Inspector for the Town 
of Swampscott. Isa is a Veterinary Technician by trade. As Animal Inspector, she is responsible for all 
animals quarantined. This is a position that is mandated by the State of Massachusetts. 

AGGREGATE INDUSTRIES QUARRY 

In July of 2002, the Board of Health voted unanimously that they did not consider Aggregate 

Industries to be a noisome trade. At present, Aggregate Industries has installed a wheel wash system to 

cut down on the dust from the trucks. There are also plans to drop the rock crusher deeper into the earth 

to help muffle the noise caused by its operation. The Board of Health, along with the Earth Removal 

Advisory Committee (ERAC), will continue to monitor the situation. 

NORTH SHORE WELLNESS FAIR 

The North Shore Wellness Fair was a huge success. We were able to offer health screenings; 
educational materials, a 5k-road race, fun and entertainment go for all ages. We have already started 
planning next year's event 

PUBLIC SAFETY DAY 

For the past three years, the Public Health Nurse participated in the annual Public Safety Day 
held at Blodgett field. This event helps residents to become more aware about health concerns such as 
sun safety, helmet use, car seats, fire safety, etc. Nurse Blake gave out sun block, safety awareness 
activity book and informational materials. 
OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST 

The Swampscott Board of Health attended a primary certification program sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Association of Health Boards. The Board of Health is considering making this program 
mandatory for any incoming board members as they feel it is quite beneficial to their function as a Health 
Board. The Board of Health also became members of this organization. 

James Marotta, Public Health Director, and Public Health Nurse, June Blake, met with the new 
Health Commissioner for the State of Massachusetts, Christine Ferguson. Ms. Ferguson stated that there 
have been many budget cuts and we will all have to adjust. Ideally, the State would like to see programs 
continued with local funds. This is going to be a very difficult task considering that local funding has also 
experienced budget cuts. 

The "Ask The Nurse" program was started at the Council on Aging. Each Thursday, the Public 
Health Nurse is available for medical counseling to the elderly. 

The Public Health Nurse is attending Salem State College to obtain her bachelor of science in 
nursing degree. She has also obtained American Red Cross Community Disaster Education and Health 
Services Certification. Her classes included: Intro to Disaster, Disaster Health Services, an overview and 
Disaster Health Services simulation. This course involved a three (3) day extensive session with training 
that will prepare our Public Health Nurse to be ready for anything, anywhere, anytime. 

We are pleased to announce that we are now sponsoring a preceptor ship with Salem State 
College. Our first student, Nancy Colby, was present for the Winter/Spring semester. She was a huge 
help in planning the North Shore Wellness Fair and helping with other departmental activities. We would 
like to thank Nancy for her help and wish her the best in her nursing studies. 



92 



On May 27, 2003, the Health Department took part in a mock car accident held at the 
Swampscott High School. The accident was staged by the Fire Department to educate the students 
VITAL STATISTICS 

The Town of Swampscott welcomed one hundred twenty-six (126) new residents with equal 
numbers of males and females, sixty-three (63) of each Congratulations to all! This year there were 
one hundred fifty-seven (157) deaths in Swampscott. The leading cause of death was cardiac conditions 
followed by various cancer conditions. 

In closing, we would like to thank all the dedicated staff and volunteers for making 2002 through 
June 2003 a very productive time for the Board of Health. 



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HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

In July 2002, the Commission received word from the Department of the Interior that the 
Olmsted District had been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. This is a great 
honor for our town and reflects several years of much hard work on the commission's part. A 
copy of the study and application, which prompted the nomination, is on file at the Swampscott 
Library. The commission plans to work on signage, lighting and landscaping to further enhance 
the area. 

The Historical Commission geared its energies this year to pass a Demolition Delay by- 
law at May town meeting. The article was referred back to the Commission for further study. 
This proposal is gaining widespread support through out the community, because residents 
understand that the irreplaceable loss of historic properties impacts the very character of our 
town, diminishes our property values, and threatens to alter our cultural landscape. 

Over 100 communities in Massachusetts have already passed the by-law, including 
Danvers, Ipswich, Salem, Beverly, Saugus and Lynn. 

A general by-law (not a zoning by-law), this local legislation prompts the local Building 
Inspector to notify the Historical Commission when a permit is received for the demolition of a 
building, which meets specific criteria. 

The criteria are: that the building is 75 years of age and older. That it is listed on the 
National Register of Historic Places or that it is defined as importantly associated with one or 
more historic persons or events, or with the broad architectural cultural, political, economic or 
social history of Swampscott or that it is historically or architecturally significant an/or listed in the 
Swampscott Historical Commission Survey of 1986. 

If the building meets any of these criteria, a nine-month delay on demolition is imposed 
during which time efforts would be made to work out both preservation of the property and the 
owner's objectives. A property can be preserved if the owner is willing to rehabilitate or restore it 
or perhaps save its historic aspects. Another owner may be willing to maintain the property rather 
than develop it. But, if a solution is not found during the nine-month delay period, demolition can 
proceed. 

During this very busy year, Commission members also participated in the development of 
an Olmsted Walking Tour (Through the Commission's efforts, the Frederick Law Olmsted 
Subdivision was declared a National Historic Area in 2002). Sale of the Commission's 150 th 
Anniversary book topped $19,000 (funds which paid for many of the 150 th Anniversary 
celebrations). Worked with Reinhardt Associates on the ongoing renovations to the Elihu 
Thomson Administration Building, paid for with a $30,000 matching grant funded by the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission and the Town of Swampscott and submitted by the 
Commission in 2002. 

We appreciate the co-operation and assistance we received from Andrew Maylor, our 
energetic, capable Town Manager. We are grateful to the citizens of Swampscott who have 
expressed their support and appreciation and who have worked with us to attain our mutual 
goals. 

Submitted by: 

Sylvia Belkin, Chair 

Brian Best, Vice Chair 

Douglas Maitland, Secretary 

Sheila Leahy, Treasurer 

Mary M. Cassidy 

Angela Warren Ippolito 

Jean F. Reardon 

Louis A. Gallo, Associate 

Rev. Louise Mann, Associate 

David W. Callahan, member emeritus 



94 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James L. Hughes, Chairman 

Albert DiLisio Marianne McGrath 

Barbara Eldridge Patricia Krippendorf 

The Board of Governors appointed Donna McDonald executive director of the Swampscott 
Housing Authority on July 1 , 2001 . During the year July, 2002 through June, 2003, her second year as 
executive director, Donna McDonald has computerized much of the record keeping functions, many of the 
financial procedures, and the maintenance work-order system of the Housing Authority. Specialized soft- 
ware designed to meet the unique needs of small, state aided (no federal projects) authorities was 
developed by Sam Stone of CyberSense Training & Consulting, Inc., in collaboration with the 
Swampscott Housing Authority and several similarly situated, smaller housing authorities. (Sam Stone is 
a life-long Swampscott resident.) The development, and the regular use, of this specialized software have 
led to the obsolescence of much of the paperwork associated with the administration of over one hundred 
public housing units. Freed from a substantial amount of the prior daily routine of paper work, the 
Executive Director now has additional time to focus more of her attention on quality of tenant life issues 
and addition modernization programs. 

In 2002, the Authority received word from the Massachusetts Department of Housing and 
Community Development of the approval and funding of two new modernization programs. One is the 
replacement of the boilers in the six (6) buildings at the Duncan Terrace, Program 667-1, 
Elderly/Handicapped community. Cronis, Liston, Nangle & White LLP did the engineering and design 
from Danvers, MA. Upon completion of the design phase, bids were sought for construction. In the spring 
of 2003, the contract in the amount of $248,000 was awarded to Poirier & Springer, Inc., HVAC 
Mechanical Contractors of Billerica, MA. As of this report, construction activity is in full swing. It is 
anticipated that this construction project will be completed before the start of the heating season in the fall 
of 2003. All the heating units slated for replacement are original equipment installed in 1961. The 
installation of the new boilers will make a significant difference in the quality of life of the 
elderly/handicapped residing at Duncan Terrace by providing year round, dependable heat and hot water. 
The systems being replaced have been the cause of increasing concern for the Authority. During the 
heating season, system failures have resulted in discomfort to the tenants and the consumption of an 
inordinate share of maintenance time. Additional benefits of the new systems are more heat and hot 
water at a lower cost due to increased efficiency of the new units, and an increase in the safety of 
performance of maintenance by relocation and modernization of various valves in the system. The 
second modernization project approved and funded this year is the replacement of the roof shingles and 
the installation of gutters at the Doherty Circle, Program 667-2, Elderly/Handicapped Community. The 
asphalt shingle roofs will be replaced, and gutters will be installed on the six buildings at Doherty Circle. 
The roofs to be replaced are at the end of the normal life expectancy of an asphalt roof. The Doherty 
Circle buildings were constructed without gutters on the eaves. The installation of gutters will improve the 
quality of life at Doherty Circle by protecting the common ways from rainwater and snow melt from the 
roofs of the buildings. This project is currently in the design phase; the Massachusetts Department of 
Housing and Community Development in-house staff engineers are providing the design services for this 
project. The construction contract will be put out to bid later this year after the design specifications are 
completed. 

Another long anticipated modernization project, new boilers and heating system upgrade in the 
36 family units at the Margaret Kelly Family Housing Community, Program 200-1 Veterans Family 
Housing, has been put on hold by the Department of Housing and Community Development due to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts budget crisis. 

During the months of March, April and May, and extending one week into June 2003, the office of 
A. Joseph DeNucci, Auditor of the Commonwealth, conducted an on-site, periodic audit of the 
Swampscott Housing Authority. This comprehensive audit, involving Housing Authority management 
activities from October 1 , 2001 through February 28, 2003, is a routine audit required by state law and is 
usually conducted by the auditor every three years. Auditor DeNucci informed the Chairman of the Board 
of Governors on June 19, 2003, that based on a more than two-month, on-site review of procedures and 
records of the Authority; the Swampscott Housing Authority has maintained adequate management 
controls and complied with applicable laws, rules, and regulations during the review period. 

In cooperation with the sponsoring churches of Swampscott and the Swampscott Senior Center, 
the Housing Authority has established food distribution points in Duncan Terrace and in Doherty Circle for 



95 



the residents of these communities participating in the Inter-Faith Food Pantry of Swampscott. Once a 
month, the Inter-Faith Food Pantry provides free food for elders and the handicapped residents of 
Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. 

The Swampscott Housing Authority would like to thank Swampscott Police Patrolman, Saverio 
(Savy) Caruso for his assistance as the SPD liaison to the Housing Authority. 

In the April, 2003 Swampscott Town Election, Patricia Krippendorf was re-elected to the Board of 
Governors of the Swampscott Housing Authority. 

The Board of Governors, the Executive Director, and the staff of the Swampscott Housing 
Authority continue to be committed to providing safe, comfortable and affordable housing for qualified 
tenants. 

Respectfully submitted, 
James L. Hughes 
Chairperson 



96 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The library is a successfully functioning facility with an abundance of valuable materials. Our 
building is a patron friendly establishment that prides itself on being the best. We were forced to 
close Sundays beginning in March due to budget and we are projecting fewer hours in FY04.0ur 
goal is to keep the doors of the library open as many hours as fiscally possible. 

We have increased our circulation by over 20,000 items this year including books, magazines, 
CD's, videos and books on tape. We have had over 65,000 people in attendance throughout this 
12-month period. We have more than 1 1 ,000 registered borrowers at the library. 
The year FY03 was an extremely good year for grant writing. We received a $12,975 grant from 
the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. This grant allowed us to add four new computers to the 
library. We also purchased with this grant money; a network printer, a new switch for hooking up 
to the Internet and rewired some of the building to accommodate new computer drops. Fleet 
Bank of Vinnin Square awarded us a grant of $500 to purchase audio books for our senior 
citizens. WALMART granted us a $1,000 literacy grant. This money will be used to purchase 
books for both the adult and children's sections of the library. The Massachusetts Board of 
Library Commissioners awarded us a grant of $7,500 for customer service. A large portion of this 
grant went to purchasing signage throughout the library. When the addition/renovation project 
was completed at the library seven years ago, we didn't have funding for signs. This grant 
allowed us to better serve our patrons by defining sections of the library with clearly labeled signs. 
During this year we also replaced the windows in the Reference room. This was a project funded 
by Capital Improvements. The skylight in the meeting room was replaced with funding from the 
Friends of the Swampscott Library. We have reported to the DPW this year that the roof in the 
lobby area is leaking and more than likely will need to be replaced. 

This year the library turned back $5000 to the town administrator to help defray costs within 
the town budget and to avoid and overrun of the FY03 budget. We also contributed over $9500 
in fine money to the general fund. 

The library has been extremely busy this past year. As the circulation figures attest, we have 
been checking out a great many items to our patrons. Our computers are in constant use 
throughout the day. At any hour you may find every computer station occupied, with a waiting list 
at the reference desk. We have opened up our computer lab two afternoons per week for the 
teens in town. Our new Reference Librarian Sandra Moltz, who replaced Vicky Coffin, mans this 
lab. By using the lab at this time, we free up the computers on the main floor so that we can 
accommodate more patrons. The computer lab is used during the week at other times for training 
and computer classes. We had received a computer-training grant in FY02 and we were 
committed to continue teaching classes in FY03. We rotated classes from basic computer 
instruction to resume writing on the computer. These classes were all well attended with waiting 
lists for all. 

Many of the town's people have been coming to the library and availing themselves of all of 
our up-to-date technology. We now have more than 20 computers in the library for public use. 
Many of these are available for patrons to check their e-mail, do Internet searches, search 
magazine databases and produce word processing documents. The library's website is very 
active. We include all pertinent library information on it, as well as our bi-monthly newsletter, 
which is funded by the Friends of the Library. 

The library has offered a variety of adult programs throughout the year. We host several book 
discussion groups, a Swampscott history discussion group, guest speakers, computer training 
classes, and a program called "Practically Speaking" which allows our new Russian immigrants to 
practice their English speaking skills. This year we also continued with our 'Town-wide Read" 
Program. This year's book was To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The idea of a town wide 
read is a very unifying thing for a community, especially one that declares itself a "No Place For 
Hate" community. The year we had book discussions on To Kill a Mockingbird, we screened the 
movie with Gregory Peck and we held a discussion of the legal aspects of the book with Attorney 
William Dimento. 

The Children's Department had another very productive year. The librarians ran many classes 
for school visits, did outreach to the schools and ran a multitude of programs and activities. The 



97 



Children's room is constantly in use whether it be with the school children during school hours for 
class visits or after school for homework help or to pick up a good book. We encourage small 
mother's groups to come to the library and meet with their children. We offered story times for all 
ages from lap sit to programs for five-year-olds. 

The Friends of the Swampscott Public Library continue to be very supportive of library 
activities. They have purchased numerous museum passes for our patrons' use (Children's 
Museum, Science Museum, Isabella Gardner Museum, John F. Kennedy Library, The 
Peabody/Essex Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts, The Franklin and Stone Zoo, and Boston 
by foot) The Friends also support summer children's programming, teen programming, pay for the 
printing and postage of our newsletter, and help to defray the costs of refreshments for our 
programs. 

The many volunteers who offer their service to the Swampscott Library continued this year. 
These dedicated people perform whatever tasks we assign them with great care and diligence. 
The library could not possibly function as well as it does without these very committed individuals. 

In conclusion, it is because of the dedication of the staff, and the Board of Trustees and the 
Friends of the library that the Swampscott Public Library is available to the town. It is because of 
the support of the townspeople that the library is a success. 
BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Carl Reardon, Chairman 

John Karwowski, Vice Chair Vacant, Secretary 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Alyce Deveau, Director Susan Conner, Assistant Director 

Sandra Moltz, Reference Librarian Maureen McCarthy, Circulation 

Elizabeth Coughlin, Children's Librarian Izraela Abrams, Children's Librarian 

Marcia Harrison, Cataloguer Ann Nechtem, Library Assistant 

Barbara Wermuth, Tech Aide Dorothy Forman, Secretary 

Joanne Janakas, Library Aide Rebecca Ingalls, Library Aide 

Maralyn Keay, Library Aide Yelena Kuzmina, Library Aide 

Cynthia Zeman, Library Aide Sami Lawlor, Library Aide 

Marie Epstein, Library Aide Penny Longhurst, Library Aide 



98 



MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Swampscott Representative 
Joseph J Balsama 

The MBTA Advisory Board is made up of representatives from 175 cities and towns that 
are serviced by the MBTA. The office is located at 177 Tremont Street, 4 th Floor, Boston, 
Massachusetts 02111-1020. Paul Reagan is the Executive Director. The telephone number is 
(617) 426-6054. Fax: (617) 451-2054. E-mail: advbrd(S)erols.com web site: 
www.mbtaadvisoryboard.org 

The Chairman is David Cohen, the Mayor of Newton; Vice-chairs are Barbara Marcks of 
Lincoln and Marcia Crowley of Wayland; Clerk, Vineet Gupta of Boston. Joe Carter is the new 
MBTA Police Chief. He was installed on February 6, 2003 at a ceremony at Madison Park 
Vocational School in Boston. 

Meetings of the full Advisory Board were held on October 29, 2002, February 1 1 , 2003, 
April 1 1 , 2003 and May 29, 2003. All meetings were held on the second floor of the State 
Transportation Building at 10 Park Plaza in Boston. 

It was voted to hire the Massachusetts Bay Commuter Railroad Company (MCBR) as of 
July 1, 2003 (replacing Amtrak) to run the commuter rail service. MCBR is a Boston-based 
company. Mr. Jack Leary is the Managing Director and the General Manager is Kevin Lydon. 

Because of declining revenues and decrease in ridership, there will be a 25 percent fare 
increase effective on January 1, 2004. Also, in danger of being cut is the weekend "Night Owl 
Service", which began in September of 2001. This extended weekend service on Friday and 
Saturday Nights up to 2:30 A.M. On February 1 1 th , the MBTA Advisory Board recommended that 
it be extended to June 30, 2003. What happens after that will depend on available funding. The 
Airport station on the Blue Line is in the process of being moved closer to the Wood Island 
station. 

The MBTA services the Town of Swampscott directly through buses and commuter rail, 
and indirectly by the Blue Line, when commuters drive to Revere and park and board the Blue 
Line trains for Boston. There are plans to extend the Blue Line to Lynn and perhaps other North 
Shore Communities. The latest train and bus schedules, which change about twice a year, are 
available at Fiory's Variety Store, the Town Clerk's Office, the Swampscott Public Library and 
several other places around town. You can buy commuter rail tickets at Fiory's. The Greater 
Lynn Senior Services, Ind. (GLSS), 105 Summit Drive, Peabody, MA 01960 administer THE 
RIDE (the MBTA's paratransit service), which transports people with disabilities. The telephone 
number is (978) 573-9300. More information can be obtained from the Swampscott Council on 
aging (781 ) 596-8866. 



99 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



The Metropolitan Area Planning Council is the regional planning and economic development district 
representing 101 cities and towns in metropolitan Boston. In addition, the Council shares oversight 
responsibility for the region's federally funded transportation program as one of 14 members of the 
Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization. The Council's legislative mandate is to provide technical and 
professional resources to improve the physical, social and economic condition of its district, and to 
develop sound responses to issues of regional significance. The Council provides research, studies, 
publications, facilitation and technical assistance in the areas of land use and the environment, housing, 
transportation, water resources management, economic development, demographic and socioeconomic 
data, legislative policy and interlocal partnerships that strengthen the operation of local governments. 
The Council is governed by 101 municipal government representatives, 21 gubernatorial appointees, and 
10 state and 3 city of Boston officials. An Executive Committee composed of 25 members oversees 
agency operations and appoints an executive director. The agency employs approximately 30 
professional and administrative staff. Funding for Council activities is derived from contracts with 
government agencies and private entities, foundation grants, and a per-capita assessment charged to 
municipalities within the district. 

In the past year, the Council has focused on initiatives that respond to regional challenges, some of which 
include: 

• Municipal planning: working with more than 25 communities under the Executive Order 418 
program. EO 418 provides communities with up to $30,000 in state funding to undertake overall 
visioning on local planning issues, including housing, economic development, natural resources, 
and transportation. 

• Bringing advanced technology to cities and towns in the region: a contract with Pictometry 
International will provide aerial photographic images that municipal departments, including police 
and fire, can utilize to improve service delivery. 

• Adoption of smart growth principles: MAPC developed and adopted principles of good 
planning practice that will encourage sustainable patterns of growth to benefit people living 
throughout the metro Boston region. MAPC is also a founding member of the Massachusetts 
Smart Growth Alliance. 

• Metro Data Center: The Center is an official US Census affiliate, helping to distribute 
demographic data throughout the region, including demographic, economic, and housing profiles 
for all 101 communities in metro Boston. 

• Transportation planning: as vice chair of the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization, MAPC 
worked to develop the 25-year Regional Transportation Plan as well as the annual Transportation 
Improvement Program, including transportation spending priorities for the region. We also 
spearheaded development of transportation spending criteria, taking into account environmental, 
economic, and equity considerations. 

• Metropolitan Highway System Advisory Board: MAPC staffs this board, established in 1997 
by the Commonwealth to advise the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority on issues relative to land 
use, air rights, zoning, and environmental impacts associated with development of land owned by 
the authority. 

• Regional Services Consortiums: The four regional consortiums established by MAPC 
collectively purchased $18 million in office supplies and highway maintenance services for its 31 
member municipalities. The project also facilitates collegial forums among members' chief 
administrative officers focused on collaborative problem solving and resource sharing. 

• Metro Mayors Coalition: Working with the mayors and city managers of 10 municipalities in the 
urban core on issues such as group purchasing, employee health insurance, security and 
emergency coordination, and municipal relief legislation. 

• Homeland security: addressing homeland security issues by facilitating cross-municipal 
partnerships between police, fire, and emergency management departments to acquire and share 
equipment, and more generally to plan for emergencies involving multiple municipalities. 

• Hazard mitigation: initiating a federally-funded partnership to produce a hazard mitigation plan 
to protect nine coastal communities in the event of natural disasters, including flood, winter storm, 
wind, fire, and geologic hazards. 



100 



Please visit our website, www.mapc.org, for more details about these and other activities. 
Metrofuture: Making A Greater Boston Region 

MAPC has launched a new civic process, called MetroFuture, to create an updated regional vision and 
growth strategy for metropolitan Boston. MetroFuture engages city and town governments, state 
agencies, non-profits, business, labor and academic groups in this planning process. The outcome will be 
a vision and growth strategy that puts the region on a sustainable path in terms of land use, economic, 
environmental and social issues. MAPC will need the support of a broad range of organizations in the 
region to help plan, fund and implement this new framework for addressing the challenges facing 
metropolitan Boston. 

The effort to create this new strategy was launched on October 29, 2003 at a Boston College Citizens 
Seminar. More than 400 citizens from a wide range of local and regional groups attended the event, and 
expressed their opinions on the region's resources and challenges as well as their own visions for the 
future. This input will be critical as we move to the next phase of this exciting multi-year project. Please 
visit the project web site, www.metrofuture.org, f or more information. 

North Shore Task Force (Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Gloucester, Ipswich, Manchester by the Sea, 
Marblehead, Middleton, Peabody, Rowley, Salem, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham) 

During the past year the members of the North Shore Task Force took part in a variety of activities, 
including the following: learned about the availability of obtaining environmental technical resources 
through Coastal Zone Management and the Massachusetts Bays Program; learned about Pictometry 
from MAPC staff; took part in a Transportation Improvement Program criteria session with MAPC and the 
Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS); was presented MAPC's Decade of Change presentation 
by MAPC staff outlining demographic changes gleaned from the 2000 census; offered comments to and 
heard presentation from CTPS staff on operational improvements planned for Route 128 from Beverly to 
Gloucester; learned about the Ipswich River Watershed Management Plan and how they could contribute 
to it; heard from MAPC staff on how to take advantage of savings offered under the MAPC Regional 
Services Consortium; took part in a presentation and commented on proposed changes to MGL 40A 
under the Land Use Reform Act; in conjunction with CTPS staff, helped to develop and then review final 
results of the North Shore Congested Signalized Intersection Study; commented on the Metropolitan 
Planning Organization Transportation Plan and Unified Planning Work Program, began to learn how 
North Shore area municipalities can learn more about alternative energy options from the Massachusetts 
Technology Collaborative and actively participated in developing a participation strategy for the North 
Shore region for the "Visions Across the Region" Regional Vision and Growth Strategy. 



101 



North Shore Regional Vocational School District School Committee 



Mary Marrs - Swampscott Representative 
Amelia P. O'Malley, Superintendent-Director 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District 

Merger Study 

On December 4, 2002 legislation calling for the Merger of Essex Agricultural Institute and North Shore 
Technical High School was filed by Senator Frederick Berry. The legislation calls for a Feasibility Study 
before approval of the request of the project is put to a vote by the cities and towns that make up the North 
Shore Regional Vocational School District. 
Enrollment 

Student enrollment as of October 1 , 2002 was 443. 
Curriculum 

All students are enrolled in at least Introductory Algebra in the 9th grade, with most students taking 
Algebra I, Accelerated Algebra or College Geometry. The mathematics program extends through Algebra 
II, Pre-Calculus, and Calculus in the upper grades. Plans exist for the addition of an 1 1 th grade course in 
Integrated Mathematics and a 1 2 th grade course in Discrete Mathematics for college preparatory students 
who choose not to take Pre-Calculus. 

MCAS scores continue to improve in mathematics. Last spring's 10 th graders achieved a passing rate of 
68% on their first attempt at the test. An increased number of students are passing at the Proficient and 
Advanced levels. 

Essential Strategies, formerly called MCAS Prep, are required classes for all ninth and tenth graders not 
taking Spanish. This ensures that all students receive adequate preparation for the state test. The results 
from the 2002 test saw an increase, from 65% to 85%, for NSTHS students who passed the English 
portion of the test. 

The Social Studies Department will begin work on the new standards for their discipline. This will involve 
an analysis of the new guidelines, an examination of current curriculum, and discussions on how best to 
integrate the two. 

The foreign language component continues to be a popular elective for students. Because of the 
increase in demand, two sections of Spanish I and two sections of Spanish II were offered this year. 
More students who come to North Shore Tech want the option of continuing their education after high 
school, and this elective provides for that option. 

The Technical Writing Program continues to be upgraded. This year one English teacher, with an 
extensive background in business, has been assigned to help vocational instructors develop relevant 
writing assignments. A new grading rubric was designed to ensure consistency throughout the program. 
The foundation of the Title I program is a fifteen (15) station computer lab dedicated to helping students to 
improve in spelling, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and writing skills. Students also strive to improve 
basic mathematical skills and concepts. 
MCAS Review 

Students who have been identified as needing to re-take the MCAS have been enrolled in an after school 

program. 

School Council 

The School Council, which consists of faculty members, parents, business people and a student, meets 
monthly with the Principal. In addition to reviewing the budget and updating the handbook, the Council 
advises the Principal on the curriculum and other program changes. The School Council is working on a 
second "Up All Night" graduation celebration for June 2002. 
General and Program Advisory Committees 

In two (2) meetings this year the program and general advisory committee met and continue to aid in 
upgrading curriculum to industry standards. 
Vocational - Service Cluster 

The Vocational areas are developing not only technical skills but are also learning workplace skills such 
as professionalism, communication skills and teamwork. Students from different shops are working 
together in many areas drawing on each other's expertise to complete different tasks. Commercial Art 
and Graphics combined their skills to create the school's holiday card while Culinary and Marketing work 



102 



together in operating the Log Bridge Inn. This sense of camaraderie goes beyond the service cluster and 

can be found when we see Carpentry and Machine Tech helping create a sign for the Log Bridge Inn, 

Masonry lending their expertise in helping design a more appealing side entrance to the building. 

School wide initiatives have been ongoing and the implementation of the student portfolio at the tenth 

grade level this year, both in shop and academic, has added the valuable form of authentic assessment 

for the students to validate their successes. 

Cosmetology 

Students in the cosmetology program continue to perfect their skill by attending the New England Expo 
Hair Show in Boston where they were exposed to current ideas, new equipment, techniques and new 
product knowledge that further their education in the field of cosmetology. In addition to hair, nails and 
skin they are also gaining knowledge in client management using technology and performing skin care in 
the new facial area with an enhanced lighting system. Every graduating senior that took the state boards 
last year passed and received their state cosmetology license. 
Culinary Arts 

The renovations made to the Log Bridge Inn this fall will allow the students to service customers in an 
elegant restaurant environment. Students are completing quarterly projects that incorporate both tech 
writing and portfolios, which allows them the opportunity to evaluate their individual progress. 
Commercial Art 

Students are learning the new technology that was purchased last year. Quarterly projects have been 
developed that allow students to draw, paint and write. 

The addition of a new sign-making machine is allowing students to use technology in creating signs. 
Commercial Art students are currently making signs for all shop doors in the building. In addition, we will 
be naming hallways and the students will create street signs. 
Graphics Arts 

The addition of a new Docucolor 12 has given students exposure to the latest technology in digital 
printing. In the offset area the new two-color press has allowed student to produce quality work on 
equipment they will be using in the field. 
Health Tech 

The Health Tech Program has received its Department of Public Health provider number allowing us to 
train Certified Nursing Assistants. We are currently awaiting approval from the Department of Education. 
In addition a new entry-level Mental Health training has been coordinated with Hogan. The program is 
currently planning on expanding into training students in the area of EKG and phlebotomy. Students are 
currently receiving certificates in CPR and First Aid. 
Marketing 

The addition of a school store/bakery/copy center to the marketing shop is allowing students to develop a 
better understanding how the retail industry operates. 

Students currently are actively involved in creating the layout for this year's yearbook giving them 
exposure to the PageMaker program. New technology applications to the shop last year allow students 
to improve their basic knowledge of the Microsoft Office Package into marketable skills. 
Vocational - Technical Cluster 
Carpentry/Masonry 

Junior and senior carpentry and masonry students are currently working on several off-campus projects. 
The carpentry crews have recently completed a handicap ramp for the town of Essex at the Town 
Hall/Library building. The next project on the list is an 18'x17' sunroom addition at 10 Bradford Avenue in 
Danvers. 

The masonry crews have completed a brick walkway and brick stairs in Boxford, repairs on a retaining 
wall in Nahant, and are currently working on a stone retaining wall in Middleton. 
Automotive/Collision Repair 

These shops provide a service to residents of the community while teaching trade skills and 
competencies to their students. 

Reorganization of the automotive shop has been completed. A classroom has been relocated to the front 
of the shop. In addition, the masonry students erected a half wall in the automotive shop; this created a 
safe walkway to the Collision Repair and Machine Tech shops. 

Collision Repair received their initial NATEF certification. The shop has been improved in several areas, 
as recommended through the Program Advisory and NATEF. 



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The shop has been improved in several areas, as recommended through the Program Advisory and 
NATEF. 

Machine Technology 

Improvements to the machine shop continue this year with the creation of new teacher area and 
reconfiguration of machine layout. 
Information Systems Technology 

This year the Information Systems Technology (hereinafter I. S T.) department continues with curriculum 
development to train students for A+ and Cisco certification. The I. ST. lab has been relocated to the first 
floor. The sophomore year curriculum concentrates on preparation for the A+ certification test and an 
introduction to first semester Cisco network training. 

The goal for the junior year is to complete the Cisco curriculum training allowing the senior year to be 
devoted to preparation and successful completion of the A+, Net Plus, and Cisco CCNA certifications. 
In addition to this, an I.S.T. "Help Desk" has been established. Junior and senior I. S T. students offer "in 
house" trouble shooting, repair, and service computer hard and software. 
Technology 

Network drops are in all the classrooms and office areas; the District is 100% network connected, 
including thirteen (13) networked printers. 

Our Proxy Server was replaced with a Linux based JoeBox firewall, which provides Internet filtering and 
security, this device is maintained via an annual contract with our Internet Service Provider, MecNet. This 
device enables us to be compliant to CIPA. 

Approximately two hundred (200) personal computers are in use in the District. One hundred and forty 
one (141) are used for instruction and fifty-nine (59) by the Administration/Faculty. The Student to 
Computer Ratio as reported to the Department of Education is 3.09, well within the 5.0 requirements by 
2003 from Department of Education. Currently we meet all the major "Local Technology Plan Benchmark 
Standards for Year 2003" from the Department of Education. 

School Year 2001-2002 was our first full year using the MMS Administrative Software. We are in a 
"learning curve" mode and continue to become more proficient using the system. 
We purchased four (4) Smart boards, several are permanently mounted in computer labs and several are 
mobile. These Smart Boards facilitate computer lab instruction and enhance presentation skills. 
Technology continues to be integrated into the curriculum vocationally and academically. We use the 
Office 2000 Suite, (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access) to develop writing, spreadsheet, data base 
management and presentation skills. We upgraded to Auto Cad 2000 and the latest MasterCam update. 
The faculty/staff continues to use a vast array or specialty software applications. 
Professional Development 

Two graduate courses were offered on site and were filled to capacity: 

Administration and Assessment of Tests used to Determine Student Disabilities. 
Using Technology to develop Curriculum Projects 

Several administrators and teachers completed Research for Better Teaching courses. 

Through the High Schools That Work initiative, faculty members have visited other vocational high 

schools and have shared "best practices." Fourteen (14) teachers and administrators attended the 

national conference in Louisville, Kentucky. 

Special Education Department 

There are approximately 1 85 students at North Shore Technical High School who have been identified as 
having special needs; they represent 41% of the general student population. 

The special education program is inclusive in nature. Inclusion classes are offered in all grades and in 
every major academic subject area. In conjunction with this, many special needs students receive 
academic support services in the Tutoring Center, under the direction of the Special Education 
Coordinator. 

There is a self-contained program for students with special needs who are developing skills for 
competitive employment. 

Teachers certified in Wilson Reading provide individual tutorials in the Wilson methods to those students 
with significant reading deficits, in compliance with their lEPs. Our Speech and Language Pathologist 
provides both individual and small group instruction in the area of communication, including receptive and 
expressive language skills (both oral and written), reading, vocabulary, phonological processing, usage, 
social language and articulation. 



104 



Through our special education Program Improvement Grant, members of the special education 
department have formed study groups to learn more about certain types of disabilities. This year, they 
are studying Neurological Impairment, Emotional Impairment, Communication Impairment and disabilities 
in the Autism Spectrum. 

Every year an independent evaluator visits the district, observes some of the components of the special 
education program, and interviews parents, students, teachers and administrators. The evaluation was 
done by Dr. Susan E. Gately. She commended the special education department for its overall 
compliance with PL 94-142 (IDEA) and Chapter 766 regulations, commenting that, "Parents are ensured 
due process rights and overall special education programs fulfill requirements of state and federal laws." 
The Department was also commended for "its commitment for providing appropriate access to the 
general education curriculum." The Department was further commended for its excellent relationships 
with parents. 
Athletic Department 

The 2001-2002 Basketball season saw great improvement for the girl's team. The boy's basketball 
team had a very difficult season. 

Spring of 2002 brought a renewed life to the athletic program as the students turned out in record 
numbers for baseball and softball. Both teams second place in their divisions and qualified for the State 
Vocational Tournaments and the MIAA State Tournament. 

Over seventy (70) students participated in football over the season, and we fielded three (3) full teams, 
freshman, Junior Varsity, and Varsity. The team finished with a 6 - 5 record and finished in 2 nd place in 
the division. 

The girl's volleyball team won the League Championship and advanced to the quarterfinals of the State 
Tournament before being eliminated. 

The soccer team, under the direction of new head coach Mr. Bob Parsons, was in a rebuilding year after 
graduating nine (9) seniors. Despite that fact the team was very competitive and the turnout was great. 
The cheering squad was so large this fall that we had to have tryouts for the competition squad. The 
squad competed in several competitions and advanced to the State Regionals before being eliminated. 
Two North Shore students participated with the Essex Aggie Cross Country team this fall. 
Although un-funded, we are starting an Indoor Track program this fall and hope to fund raise enough to 
cover all expenses. 

Locker room space continues to be an issue in the afternoon. 

The Co-op program with Essex Aggie has been very successful. I am recommending the continuation of 
the fall programs and have already been given approval by the State to pursue co-op programs in the 
spring with baseball and softball. 
Career Exploration 

The focus of the career exploratory program is to familiarize all 9 th grade students with North Shore 
Technical High Schools vocational/technical areas. The exploratory has been modified in the last two 
years so that students spend four (4) periods in shop and four (4) in academics. The students will have 
completed their exploratory in the early spring and will then re-explore three (3) shops before making their 
final shop selection. 

During December, guidance will administer the CDM Interest Inventory to all freshmen. This is a tool 
used to assist the students in choosing their program and a springboard for discussion about post 
secondary plans. 
School-to-Work/Placement 

In the 2001-02 school year over seventy (70) students participated in the Cooperative Education 
Program. Each of these students worked during school time in their vocational/technical area on the job 
gaining experience and school credit. North Shore Tech is using the modified Massachusetts Worked- 
Based Learning Plan developed by the Eastern Massachusetts Cooperative Coordinators to evaluate the 
students' progress in the following areas: communication, problem solving, professionalism and 
interaction with co-workers. 

The class of 2002 saw 43% of the graduates matriculate at two or four year post-secondary institutions, 
54% were placed in jobs related to their vocational/technical program and 3% began a full-time military 
commitment. North Shore Technical High School continues to offer permanent placement service 
including career guidance to all graduates. 



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Tech Prep 

North Shore Technical High School is participating in the Tech Prep Program in a number of 
vocational/technical areas. Programs of study that have articulation agreements with the Tech Prep 
frameworks include Marketing & Information Technology, Health & Science Technology, and the Culinary 
Arts Department. 

Specific course articulation agreements that presently exist or are currently pending have been 
established with North Shore Community College. The courses that are covered via articulation 
agreements include Death & Dying Seminar, The Body in Health & Disease, Basic Culinary Techniques, 
Food Fabrication & Production, and Marketing I, 

The above-mentioned articulation agreements provide North Shore Technical High School students with 
an opportunity to earn college credit at North Shore Community College while enrolled as students at the 
high school. Each program has been reviewed by the post secondary schools professional staff and 
been deemed to meet the criteria of coursework at the college level at North Shore Community College. 
School Social Worker 

Students serviced by the School Social Worker present with a wide range of social, emotional and mental 
health issues such as: depression, anxiety disorders, current and/or past trauma (including child abuse 
and/or neglect, sexual assault, domestic violence), family disturbance and/or crises (e.g. divorce, death, 
out-of home placement, homelessness, unemployment of parent), anger management difficulties, teen 
pregnancy, substance abuse, relationship issues, identity issues, conflicts with peers and/or adults. The 
School Social Worker is able to make mental health assessments and provide crisis intervention, in- 
school counseling and monitoring and/or refer to various social service agencies outside the school when 
necessary and appropriate. 

The School Social Worker is available to teachers and parents for consultation regarding various 
students' behaviors and mental health issues. 

The School Social Worker is the coordinator and supervisor of a Peer Mediation Program at North Shore 
Tech, now into its third year. 
Health Office - School Nurse 

There were 3,512 student visits to the health office during the 2001-2002 school year. Over one 
thousand of these visits were for the complaint of headache. A headache assessment tool was used to 
evaluate this problem. Upon assessment of this complaint most students do not eat breakfast, get 
enough sleep, or drink an adequate amount of non-caffeinated beverages. Students are encouraged to 
eat breakfast before leaving home or on arrival at school. Students are able to have water with them in 
classes. 

Students receiving daily medications at school remained consistent with the 2001 -2002 school year with 
sixteen (16) students per day. 

The school nurse continued her involvement in the Enhanced School Health Grant through the School 
Health Division of the Department of Public Health. The grant has awarded $6485 for use in the 
relocation and furnishing of the new health office planned for the 2002-2003 school year. 
Building and Grounds 

During the last year many modifications and upgrades were made to the facility. 

The Information Systems Technology lab was moved to the first floor in room 140. The lab was converted 
into two (2) classrooms. 

The nurses' office was relocated from room 154 to room 127. 

The restaurant, Log Bridge Inn, was repainted and new lighting was installed. 

A room was added to the marketing area to create a combination bakery, school store and copy center. In 
the cafeteria a new and efficient serving line was installed. 
Transportation Department 

The Transportation Department has a fleet consisting of sixteen (16) buses. The Transportation 
Department provided transportation to and from school on a daily basis for approximately 41 8 students. 
The number of students involved in sports, MCAS Prep, driver's education, Drama Club, and other after 
school activities continues to increase, therefore the number of students using the late buses and sports 
buses has increased again this year. We are almost to the point of adding a fifth bus. 
The Transportation Department provided transportation for the summer MCAS program. 
The bus garage is staffed with two mechanics, which work full time to keep the fleet running in top 
condition. 



106 



Adult Education 

Adult Evening Education at North Shore is a self-supporting program that offers more than fifty-seven (57) 

vocational-technical classes that enhance the professional and personal lives of the adult members of our 

community. The Program serves nearly one thousand adult students participating in a wide variety of 

courses. A number of courses have state approval for professional and trade license preparation. 

As part of our on-going effort to provide competitive and progressive programming greater than fifty percent 

(50%) of our course offerings are either new or greatly modified during the past five (5) years. 

Business Office 

The Business Office consists of a Business Manager, an Assistant Procurement Officer, an Accounting 
Clerk and a part time Treasurer. 

Direct deposit is up and running. Approximately 75% of our full time employees have opted to have their 
entire or a portion of their paycheck direct deposited. 

Our next goal will be to comply with GASB 34. We are confident the district will be in compliance on or 
before July 1 , 2003. 

The Department of Revenue has certified the amount in our excess and deficiency account as of July 1 , 
2002 at $381,914. We will be reducing our fiscal year 2003 community assessments by $6,821. The 
final invoice in March 2003 will reflect the reduction. 
The audit report should be issued by mid February 2003. 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee 
Beverly Paul F. McDonald 



Boxford 

Danvers 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Hamilton 

Lynnfield 

Manchester-by-the-Sea 

Marblehead 

Middleton 

Nahant 

Rockport 

Salem 

Swampscott 

Topsfield 

Wenham 



T. Frank Tyrrell, Jr., Parliamentarian 

George R. Harvey, Secretary 

Paula Evans 

David W. Ketcham 

Paul Anderson 

Joseph Sabella 

Marcia Sweeney 

Roger Drysdale, Vice Chairman 

Thomas F. Johnson 



G. Stanley Patey, III 
Thomas St. Pierre 



Mary Marrs, Chairman 
Richard Darrah 
William O. Nichols 



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PERSONNEL BOARD 

Gene Nigrelli, Chair 
Peter C. McCarriston 
David S. Van Dam 

Mike Tumulty 
Debbie Friedlander 
Nancy A. Lord, Ex-Officio 
The Personnel Board itself experienced many changes in the past year. Long time 
employee, Patricia George, became the Town's first Personnel Director before her retirement 
from the Town in December. Although Ms. George's tenure as Personnel Director was brief, the 
Board would like to thank Ms. George for her for her wisdom, dedication and commitment to the 
Board as well as the Town. In February, Nancy Lord transitioned from her position as 
Administrative Assistant to the Board of Selectmen to the position of Personnel Manger and Ex- 
Officio member of the Personnel Board. Ms. Lord is looking forward to her new position and 
familiarizing herself with the many facets of Personnel. 

Early in the year, Town Administrator Andrew W. Maylor and Nancy Lord began working 
on a policy to replace the existing, antiquated Personnel Board Bylaws. Upon completion, the 
"Personnel Policy Governing Compensation and Employment Benefits" was presented to the 
Personnel Board for its suggestions, comments and review. In May, the Personnel Board voted 
unanimously to approve the new policy with some minor changes and to present it to Town 
Meeting for a formal vote. The policy was adopted by Town Meeting on May 19, 2003. This 
policy applies to all full-time and part-time employees who work at least 20 hours per week and 
who are not covered by a collective bargaining agreement or an individual employee contract 
allowable per the provisions of MGL Ch 41 § 108. This policy is a much-needed move into the 
future. 

In June, the Board said good-bye to long time member Gene Nigrelli. Gene served on 
the Board for many years, most recently as Chair. The Board would like to take the opportunity to 
thank Mr. Nigrelli for all the time and effort that was given to Town service. Resident, Debbie 
Friedlander was appointed to the Board to replace Mr. Nigrelli. The Board welcomes Ms. 
Friedlander and looks forward to serving with her. 

With the adoption of the Town Charter, and the creation of the Town Administrator's 
position, the Personnel Board's role has been somewhat transformed. The five-member board 
will be responsible for advising the Town Administrator with regard to the administration of the 
newly adopted Personnel Policy Governing Compensation and Employment Benefits. The Board 
looks forward to working with Mr. Maylor and the employees covered by the agreement. 

As always, the Board would like to take this opportunity to express its utmost appreciation 
to all the department heads for their continued cooperation and support. 



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PLANNING BOARD 

The Planning Board held nineteen (19) meetings during the year from July 1, 2002 
through June 30, 2003 to review and to provide approval action on various plans submitted to it 
under the Massachusetts Subdivision Control law, and on-site plans submitted to it in accordance 
with Swampscott Town By-Laws. Discussions were held with Swampscott residents, developers, 
contractors, architects and engineers regarding these matters to provide guidance and to assure 
compliance with Town By-Laws and regulations. Approval action was taken on fifty-three (53) 
subdivision and street plans and site plan review applications after Board members had made 
site inspections and discussed statutory and community considerations with the applicants and 
their representatives, and received opinions from abutting neighbors and other town residents. 
This number of plans and site plan review applications is a significant increase from the fifteen 
(15) per year average that occurred in recent years. While most of the site plans pertained to 
additions to residential dwellings, approval actions also included subdivision plans and 
construction of street extensions. 

The Board monitored existing and recently approved projects for compliance with 
stipulated conditions and Planning Board Rules and Regulations. 

Five (5) public hearings were held by the Planning Board regarding proposed 
amendments to the Swampscott Zoning By-Law prior to Planning Board submittal of 
recommendations to Town Meeting adoption of various zoning by-law amendments. 

Planning Board representatives attended meetings of the Zoning Board of Appeals to 
provide information regarding the status of Planning Board actions that inter-related with ZBA 
petitions. 

The following officers were re-elected to serve the Board: 

Eugene Barden, Chairman, John Phelan, Vice-Chairman, and Veeder Nellis, 

Clerk. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its appreciation to other Town Boards and officials 
for their cooperation in helping to promote the Town's interests and welfare. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Eugene Barden, Chairman 
Jeffrey Blonder 
Richard Mcintosh 
Veeder Nellis 
John Phelan 



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POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Mission Statement 

The Swampscott Police Department is a community-oriented police department, 
committed to excellence in response to the needs of all our citizens. This commitment extends to 
all who are challenged by physical, emotional, or health considerations, all that have chosen an 
alternative lifestyle, all religions, ages, races, colors, creeds, and nationalities. This Department 
does not tolerate discrimination toward any person or group in any form. All persons have value 
and dignity. We exist to serve all people with respect, fairness and compassion. While all are 
required equally to obey the law, all shall receive equal protection of the law. 

With community service as our foundation, we strive to enhance the quality of life in 
Swampscott. We are committed to a proactive approach to policing through problem solving. 
Working in concert with the citizens of Swampscott we seek to identify and solve the root causes 
of problems in the community rather than merely responding to individual incidents. It is our goal 
to eliminate the opportunities for crime and disorder in the community and to enhance the sense 
of security and safety of the public. 

We are committed to the prevention of crime and the protection of life and property, the 
preservation of peace, order and safety. It is our duty to uphold the laws of the Town of 
Swampscott, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the United States of America. We 
consider the safeguarding of Constitutional guarantees paramount among our duties. 

We nurture public trust by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and 
ethics. The Swampscott Police Department is dedicated to the development of its members 
through effective training and leadership and to providing a quality work environment. 

We endeavor to fulfill our mission in the most effective and efficient manner, fully aware 
of our fiduciary responsibility as trustees of public funds. 
The Threat of Terrorism 

The Country continues to be confronted with a general threat of terrorist attack. Twice 
during the past year the terrorist threat level was elevated due to an increased likelihood of 
terrorist attack. The Police Department, continues to work with the Fire Department, the Town's 
Emergency Management Director, the Health Department as well as other departments in Town 
government to identify the needs of the community and to engage in emergency pre planning. 

Sergeant Gary Lord was assigned as the Terrorism Officer with the responsibility of 
ensuring the timely exchange of terrorist related intelligence information. 

In May of 2003 all ranking officers participated in three days of Incident Command 
Systems training. The training, which was provided at no cost through a grant obtained through 
the Boston Area Police Radio Network (BAPERN), was hosted by the Swampscott Police 
Department and attended by ranking officers from Marblehead and Lynn Police Department This 
training was designed to improve our response to an emergency while enhancing our ability to 
provide and receive mutual aid between departments. 

In September of 2002 thirteen North Shore Police Departments were the targeted via the 
mail with a white powder substance purported to be Anthrax. This Department was fortunate that 
our mail was delayed. When other Departments received the envelopes we were able to intercept 
the substance intended for this Department at the Post Office, transporting it to immediately to the 
State Lab for testing. There the powder was determined to be common baking soda. No suspect 
has been identified as of this writing. 

This incident illustrates the challenges facing Police Departments in this era of ongoing 
terrorist threat. While the heightened state of alert under which the Police Department now 
operates requires that all officers be watchful for suspicious persons or activities in the community 
we must remain cognizant of the constitutional rights of all people. 
Community Policing 

The Swampscott Police Department has adopted as a philosophy the principles of 
Community Policing. Community Policing redefines the police mission to focus on solving 
problems rather than simply responding to calls for service. It requires that in addition to 
responding to individual incidents, that we examine series of calls to determine if a problem 
exists. The Police Department has worked to achieve relationships with a variety of public 
agencies, community organizations and citizens to allow us to work together to develop strategies 
to solve many of the problems, which affect the safety and quality of life in Swampscott. The 



110 



objective of Community Policing is to increase the ability of the citizens of Swampscott to control 
the opportunities for crime and disorder to occur in their community. 

In 2003 the Police Department conducted a variety of community programs supported by 
grants from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and the United States 
Department of Justice as well as contributions from businesses and citizens in the Town. 

During the period covered by this report Community Policing funds were used for 
programs involving the Bike Patrol Unit, the School Resource Officers and the Traffic Unit. 
Officers were able to participate in many youth events, providing opportunities for officers and the 
children in Town to interact in positive ways. The Police Department and the Fire Department 
hosted a Public Safety Day event, which was well attended by the public. 

Bike Patrol officers conducted several bike safety presentations during this time. With an 
emphasis on safety, officers gave out coupons for a free ice cream to children that they observed 
wearing a helmet while biking or skating. The ice-cream coupons were donated by the Red Rock 
Bistro and are intended to reward and reinforce this safe behavior. Officers provided free bike 
helmets to children who did not have one. 

Officers attended a variety of community meetings for the purpose of addressing public 
concerns about problems such as traffic and crime. These meetings enhanced our ability to 
identify the root causes of problems and to design solutions, which often required the contribution 
of multiple agencies and the community to solve. 

Supervising Officers of this Department met with the new District Attorney Jon Blodget 
and members of his staff to address the matter of underage drinking, house parties and the fact 
that this conduct is occasionally condoned and even aided by parents in the mistaken belief that if 
kids are allowed to drink in the home that they will be safer. We received complete support from 
the District Attorney for our enforcement efforts and our position that underage drinking is against 
the law and will not be tolerated by this Police Department. 
Elder Outreach 

This past winter officers responded to a tragic incident in which an elderly woman died 
and her husband was hospitalized with hypothermia when their furnace broke down during a 
particularly cold spell of weather. This incident illustrated the needs of a growing portion of the 
population who desire to live independently yet often fail to take advantage of available 
assistance. As a result of this tragedy the Police Department and the Swampscott Council on 
Aging determined that there was a need to increase communication between the two 
departments as well as other agencies that provide services to elders. We recognize that the 
Police are uniquely positioned to identify people in need in the community and that it is vital that 
we refer those people to community resources. We now meet weekly with Martha Marcou the 
Executive Director of The Council on Aging to exchange information. Furthermore the 
Department Liaison meets monthly With the Executive Director, the Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Marc Paster, the Town Board of Health and representative from Greater Lynn Senior 
Services (GLSS). These meetings are designed to provide opportunities to exchange information 
and to improve the services to Town residents. 

We partnered with the Town of Nahant to provide the services of the Are You O K 
system for elders who are living alone and are at risk of becoming injured and thus being unable 
to summon help. The Are You OK System, located in Nahant Police Station, automatically dials 
the home telephones some 35 Swampscott residents at a predetermined time every day. If the 
resident fails to answer the phone a Swampscott Police Officer is dispatched to the home to 
check on their well-being. It is our goal to obtain our own system in FY04. 

We recognize the need to educate seniors in crime prevention techniques to help them 
reduce the chances of becoming the victim of a crime. We introduced the D.E.C.I.D.E 
(Developing Elder's Choices in Defensive Education) program to address this need Two 
officers, Jay Locke and Candace Doyle were trained to present the program which provides 
seniors with risk reducing strategies using crime prevention techniques to enhance their personal 
safety both at home and in public. 

Bike Patrol Unit 

With grant funds the Police Department was able to maintain the Bike Patrol Unit. The 
Unit is supervised by Sergeant William Waters and staffed by a total of ten officers who have 



111 



been trained in the use of mountain bikes on patrol. The bike officers patrolled areas in the Town 
that are not easily accessible to traditional methods of patrol and were used in our continuing 
effort to address problems of under age drinking at night in the Town's parks and beaches. 
Additionally the bike officers were used to patrol many events such as the Town's fireworks 
display, parades, outdoor concerts and road races. Mountain bike officers have proven to be 
generally more approachable than officers patrolling in police cars and enjoy opportunities to 
interact more frequently and in positive ways with the public. 
D.A.R.E. Drug Abuse Resistance Education 

The Swampscott D.A.R.E. program is a collaborative effort by D A R E. certified law 
enforcement officers, educators, students, parents and the community to offer an educational 
program in the classroom to prevent or reduce drug abuse and violence among children and 
youth. The emphasis of D.A.R.E. is to help students recognize and resist the many direct and 
subtle pressures that influence them to experiment with alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, inhalants, or 
other drugs or to engage in violence. 

The classroom teacher organizes the program content for D.A.R.E. into seventeen 45 to 
60 minute lessons taught with extended activities integrated into other instruction. The 
Swampscott Police D.A.R.E. Officer Rich Cassidy conducted weekly lessons for all students in 
grade 5. The Swampscott D.A.R.E. program has been supported in part through public 
donations. 

In addition to the D.A.R.E. curriculum the Police Department has provided students with 
many positive alternative activities. Twenty Swampscott students went to the D.A.R.E. summer 
camp sponsored by the Police Department. The camp is attended by about four hundred students 
from area communities and is coordinated by the Essex County District Attorneys Office. 
D.A.R.E Officer Cassidy along with several other officers participated in the fifth grade field day 
and a Friday night basketball league for grades 6,7, and 8. 
R.A.D. Rape Aggression Defense Classes 

The crime of rape is reported so infrequently that society in general is unaware of its 
magnitude. 

The R.AD. system is designed to equip woman to defend themselves in situations where 
their life is in jeopardy or they are at risk of serious bodily harm. The R.AD. System offers basic 
education in confrontation principals and personal defense. Our program ranges from awareness, 
risk reduction and avoidance to basic physical and verbal self-defense methods. Thus far thirty 
women have participated in the program. 

Officers Jonathan Locke, Candace Doyle and Rose Cheever are the Department's 
certified R.A.D. instructors. All three attended a demanding one-week training course to attain that 
certification. 

School Resource Officers 

In FY 03 the Police Department assigned two officers to the schools full time. Officer Jay 
Locke completed his second year at the schools while Officer Candace Doyle was assigned in 
January after Tom Hennessey resumed patrol duties. This program has been possible as a result 
of grants received from the U.S. Department of Justice. The program is a cooperative effort 
between the Swampscott Police and School Department to put police officers in school settings. 
The officers work to promote a positive relationship with the school community and provide 
opportunities for interaction between police and students. The officer's presence acts as a 
deterrent to crime and provides a degree of security and safety for the school's students, faculty, 
and visitors. 

One of the more challenging situations, which the officers contended with this school 
year, was a pair of death threats targeting the school population. One message written into a file 
in a graphic calculator specified the date of the prom as the day in which students would die. The 
second message written on a desk also threatened that students would die. In an era where 
school shootings have occurred across the nation, we considered these as serious threats and 
responded immediately. The investigation involved interviewing over one hundred students as 
well as faculty, in an effort to identify the writer or writers, determine if they were related incidents 
and assess the true nature of the threat. Police worked together with the school to ensure that the 
Prom went on as scheduled however despite the concerted effort to allay fear at the school, 



112 



student attendance was extremely low on the date in which the threat was to be carried out. That 
date passed without incident. At this writing this case remains open and under investigation. 

The School Resource Officers investigated any criminal activity that occurred in or 
around all school properties. The School Officers also followed up on cases involving students 
that occurred outside of school as well, in that many incidents carry over into the school setting. 
Officers addressed issues such aggressive bullying behavior by students and worked to promote 
teen conflict resolution. 

Along with these duties the officers also provided classroom instruction on criminal law 
and other law enforcement topics. The officers presented a classroom program to Middle School 
students that illustrated the dangers of drinking and driving. Through the use of special goggles 
students were able to see with the vision of a person with an elevated blood alcohol level. The 
School Officer also presented a program dubbed D AT E. (Defensive aggression tactic 
education). This program, presented to female students on a voluntary basis, is a modification of 
the Department's R A D. program. 

The School Officers along with the Lynn Juvenile Probation Department conducted 
curfew checks of juvenile residents who were on probation. 

The School Resource Officers in collaboration with the school community will continue to 
work to ensure that all students may receive an education in an environment free from 
harassment or threat of crime. 
Traffic Division 

The Traffic Division worked with the community to identify and address needs and 
problems concerning vehicle traffic and parking. All traffic related issues were forwarded to 
Captain Brian Chadwell and Sergeant Behen as the officers in charge of the unit. In an effort to 
solve traffic problems in the Town officers frequently met with community groups, individual 
residents and government officials. 

During the period of this report Officers worked to address neighborhood complaints 
throughout the Town. Selective Enforcement Patrols, which focused on violations perceived to 
have the greatest adverse impact upon the area, were regularly assigned to Essex Street. 
Special attention was given to vehicle speed and equipment violations. Twelve Officers, assigned 
to conduct this enforcement, received two days of specialized training with the State Police in the 
use of portable scales needed to detect overweight trucks and to cite for violations. 

Through a grant from The Governors Highway Safety Bureau the Police Department 
conducted five mobilizations, totaling forty-one patrols, targeting impaired drivers and seatbelt 
violations. These patrols were conducted on the main streets of Town and focused on other 
moving violations such as speeding and failure to obey stop signs and lights as well. 

All Sergeants were trained as instructors with the Department's laser speed unit. The unit 
accomplished the same purpose as the traditional radar gun with the ability to precisely 
distinguish which vehicle is committing the speeding offense. 

This department continued to selectively place the speed signboard on streets to monitor 
speed around Town. This equipment enables us to measure traffic volume, vehicle types and 
vehicle speeds at a given location. In addition the board prominently displays the speed of 
approaching vehicles thus providing an effective reminder for operators to obey the posted speed 
limits. 

Detective Division 

The Detective Division is comprised of Detective Sergeant Gary Lord and two detectives. 
In FY 2003 Detectives Timothy Cassidy and Ted Delano were assigned. Upon the promotion of 
Detective Cassidy to Sergeant and his subsequent return to the Patrol Division, Officer Jay Locke 
was assigned as a Detective. 

Many crimes that occur in Swampscott involve multiple jurisdictions and require that the 
Detectives maintain a relationship with the Federal, State and local law enforcement agencies. 

The Detectives were responsible for following up on a variety of crimes that ranged from 
annoying telephone calls and credit card offences to burglaries, robberies and rapes Detective 
Delano was designated as the Family Services Officer . In this capacity he monitored the status 
of forty-eight_209-A restraining orders. He maintained contact with victims, followed the progress 
of domestic court cases and ensured that the Patrol Division was kept aware of situations in 
which the victim might be at particular risk. During this period the Department filed thirty-two 51 -A 



113 



child abuse reports with the Department of Social Services. This division oversaw the handling of 
the ninety-nine domestic dispute calls received by the Department. 

Detectives conducted several undercover drug investigations along with area police 
departments and the Essex County Drug task force. As a result ten individuals known to be 
dealing drugs in Town were arrested in separate investigations. 
Animal Control Officer 

Officer Rich Cassidy is assigned as the Animal Control Officer. Officer Cassidy is a 
regular member of the Department who attends to animal related complaints in addition to his 
regular duties. The elimination of the former full time animal control position and the assignment 
of the animal control function to the Police Department were undertaken as a cost reducing 
measure for the Town. There were 401 animal related calls in FY03. 
Emergency Medical Training 

During this period training was provided to officers in CPR, First Responder and AED 
(Automated External Defibrillator. This training allowed officers to obtain or maintain their 
certification in each of these categories. Training was conducted by primarily by Lieutenant Jean 
Butler. 

In July 2002 thirty-three officers were re-certified in by the Northeast EMS Region III in 
the use of the AED. 

In June 2003, five officers obtained their initial AED certification and authorization from the 
Northeast EMS Region III. 

In December 2002 twenty-eight Regular officers and four Special officers were re- 
certified in CPR. 

In the fall of 2002 twenty-eight regular officers and four Special officers received first responder 
training in order to maintain their mandated certification. 

The Department received two new AED units at no cost through a State grant. 
Breath Alcohol Testing Unit (BATS) 

In May of 2003 the Department received new breath alcohol testing (BATS) unit. The unit, which 
was provided at no cost to the town by the Massachusetts Office of Alcohol Testing (OAT), is 
valued at $9,800 per unit. This unit is hardwired to the CJIS/LEAPS computer. The new BATS 
streamlines the testing and reporting of an operating under the influence (OUI) arrest. The 
attached laser scanner allows for the driver's license information to be entered automatically into 
the instrument. The information is then transferred on line to the Office of Alcohol Testing (OAT) 
and from there to the Registry of Motor Vehicles. Twenty-four officers were certified to perform 
breath alcohol tests with the unit. 
Firearms and Use of Force Training 

Department Instructor Officer John R. Dube conducted firearms training. Officer Dube is 
certified as an instructor by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council (MCJTC), 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Sigarms in Exeter, NH in the use of the 
AR-1 5 Patrol Rifle, Shotgun, Revolver, Semi-Auto Pistol, as well as the use of Chemical Agents, 
Handgun Retention and Patrol Baton. 

Officer Jim Schultz became a certified firearms instructor and assisted in this period's 
training. Training for all officers included annual re-qualification in the use of service pistols under 
guidelines set forth by the Criminal Justice Training Council and re-qualification training with the 
Department's Remington 12 Gauge patrol shotguns. 

All Officers received additional qualification training in the use of "less lethal weapons" 
that are in the Department's arsenal. One such weapon is the "Pepper ball" gun which is 
essentially a paintball gun used to fire a ball containing incapacitating Oleo Capsicum or pepper 
powder. Another is a special shotgun, which delivers "Kinetic Impact Round" resembling a small 
beanbag containing lead shot, which delivers a debilitating blow. These weapons systems are 
designed to disable a threatening person providing an alternative to the use of deadly force 

All Officers received eight hours of crisis negotiation training with the State Police. The 
class provided officers with skills designed to deescalate situations involving emotional disturbed 
persons under potentially lethal circumstances. 
In-Service Training 

All officers are required to attend three days of In-Service Training every two years. The 
training is held at the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council Academy in Reading, MA. 



114 



During FY03 eleven officers attended in-service which consisted of one day of legal updates, a 
day of lessons in "verbal judo" and substance abuse, and a day of officer survival training. 
Awards 

Officer John R. Cassidy and Lieutenant Paul Bartram were awarded the Police 
Department's Police Star medal for their actions surrounding a police shooting in 1993. 
Department Statistics- July 01, 2002 to June 30, 2003 

Some of the more serious offenses reported during this period included: 

• 4 Reported Rapes 

• 2 Indecent Assault & Batteries 

• 4 Robberies 

• 39 Breaking & Entering residential or commercial properties 

• 57 vehicle break-ins 

• 18 Motor Vehicles were stolen. 

• 177 larcenies 

• 99 Domestic Disputes 

The Police Department had 208 arrests. 

Officers wrote 2.457 Citation with a fine value of $45,610 

Warnings 1129 

Civil 850 

Criminal 325 

Arrest 137 

Voids 16 



Incident Type 


Total 




Incident Type 


Total 


Assist the elderly 


57 




Open and Gross Lewdness 


1 


Are you OK check 


34 




Parking Complaint 


298 


Attempted B&E 


1 




Power Failure 


26 


Accident under $1000 


203 




Property Damage 


14 


Accident Over $1000 


143 




Protective Custody 


6 


Accident with personal injury 


53 




91 1 Hang Up 


310 


Hit & Run MV accident 


79 




Recovered Property 


33 


Hit & Run MV accident w/injury 


2 




Recovered Stolen Vehicle 


7 


Alarm 


1,330 




Rape 


4 


Annoying Calls 


38 




Robbery 


4 


Assist Fire Department 


47 




Stolen License Plate 


4 


Assault 


28 




Stolen Motor Vehicle 


18 


Assault & Battery 


13 




Service Call 


190 


Assist other Police Depts. 


71 




Serve Court Papers 


83 


Break & Entering 


39 




Shoplifting 


30 


B&E Motor Vehicle 


57 




Sudden Death 


5 


Building Check 


4,004 




Suicide Attempt 


3 


Bomb Threat 


3 




Suspicious Motor Vehicle 


134 


Civil Matter 


42 




Suspicious Act 


520 


Complaint 


424 




Threats 


25 


Disturbance 


60 




Towed Motor Vehicle 


25 


Domestic Dispute 


99 




Tree Limb Down 


16 


DPW Notification 


140 




Traffic Investigation 


17 


Drug Offense 


4 




Trespassing 


8 


Erratic Operation 


62 




Truants 


7 


Fire Alarm 


70 




Vandalism 


120 



115 



Forgery 


3 




Violating 209A 


6 


Found Property 


58 




Warrant Arrest 


19 


Fireworks Complaint 


23 




Wre Down 


32 


Fire 


60 




Youth Loitering 


26 


Hate Crime 


3 




Noisy Group Inside 


9 


Hazardous Conditions 


126 




Noisy Group Outside 


64 


Indecent Assault & Battery 


2 




Drinking Indoors 


4 


Larceny 


177 




Drinking Outdoors 


6 


Lockout 


27 




Skate board/Rollerblade 


8 


Lost Property 


41 




Youth Drinking Indoors 


2 


Loud Music/Party 


96 




Youth Drinking Outdoors 


6 


Medical Aid 


127 




Youth Disturbance 


91 


Missing Person 


6 




Youth Trespassing 


6 


Disabled Motor Vehicle 


59 




Youth Vandalism/Graffiti 


6 


Motor Vehicle Stop 


2,529 




Groups Dispersed 


150 


Notification 


119 








Open Door/Window 


103 


















Animal Control 










Dog Bite 


5 








Wildlife 


57 








Loose/Stray Dog 


47 








Injured Dog or Cat 


14 








Deceased Animal 


83 








Barking Dog 


39 








Animal Complaint 


156 
























Total 


13406 



Personnel Changes 

• August 2002 Officer Chris Falasca resigned upon being dismissed from the Police 



Academy. 

• August 2002 Officer Richard Blake Transferred to the Fire Department and reverted to 
Reserve Status with the Police Department. 

• October 2002 Officers Steven Luck and Matthew MacDonald were appointed and 
attended 23 weeks of Police Academy training in Weymouth. 

• November 2002 Sergeant Anthony M. Pizzi retired. 

• December 2002 Officers George Gately and David Matherson retired. 

• January 2003 Officers Thomas Lucas, Todd Pierce and Michael Serino were appointed 
and attended 23 weeks of Police Academy training in Reading. 

• April 2003 Timothy Cassidy was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. 
Respectfully Submitted, 

Ronald J. Madigan 
Chief of Police 



116 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

It was again another busy year for the Department. It continues to work cooperatively 
with other Boards, Committees, Commissions, Town Departments and residents and would like 
to thank them for all their assistance during the past year. 

For the twelfth year, the Department was a recipient of the "Tree City USA" award. The 
Department applied for and received a Mass Relief Grant which enabled it to plant 22 trees. 

The Department continues with its annual paving, sidewalk repair, pump station 
maintenance and repairs, street line painting, grass cutting, flower and tree planting, as well as its 
day to day work including street sweeping, pruning, meter replacement and repair, water testing, 
low water pressure, painting, litter control, beach maintenance, sewer backups, drain and catch 
basin maintenance, signs, park maintenance and hydrant flushing. The Department also 
maintains the Town's cemetery and provides in house engineering services. 

The Department worked closely with the Historical Commission and Selectmen's Office 
to facilitate a grant for the Town Administration Building. In addition, the Department worked with 
the Recreation Commission in procuring an architect for the Field House Addition and is now in 
the design phase. 

The Department of Public Works spent a great deal of time and effort plowing snow and 
sanding streets during this winter. Although personnel and equipment were severely tested the 
Department did a commendable job of keeping the roads open and drivable. The Department 
also continues to answer all emergency calls for water and sewer. 

The Department of Public Works has been functioning for a complete year under the 
enterprise fund system. This year the water fund and sewer fund both earned more than they 
spent. This will prevent the Town General Fund from subsidizing the water and sewer accounts. 
The Department of Public Works office has relocated to the second story of the Town Hall. The 
Department is also working on improving the handicap accessibility at Town Hall. 

The office staff continues to provide ongoing dedication and services to the Town 
residents. The Board appreciates their efforts. 
Respectfully submitted 

Lawrence F. Picariello, Chairman Silvio J. Baruzzi, P.E. 

Robert Ward, Member Superintendent of Public Works 

Milton S. Fistel, Member Town Engineer 



117 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Paul J. Gorman, Chairman 
David Whelan, Vice Chairman William Bush, Director 

Eve Gambale Barbara Rafferty, Secretary 

Andrew B. Holmes 
Leslie Kiely 
John Hughes 
Mary Ellen Fletcher 

The policy of the Recreation Commission is to provide worthwhile leisure time activities 
for all age groups in the community. We continue to improve the areas and programs sponsored 
directly by the Commission which include parking areas, beaches and lifeguards, adult and youth 
tennis, teen fitness and conditioning, street hockey, playground activities, youth and teen sailing, 
track and field, youth and adult basketball, and a field house recreation center. We also provide 
both beach and railroad parking stickers for a fee. 

Participation in our programs continues to increase and we continue to try to minimize 
costs. The collected fees turned in to the Town General Fund for the period January 2002 
through June 2003 totaled $38,680. 

The Commission received the next phase of funding from Town Meeting to begin the field 
house expansion project to provide women's locker rooms, rest rooms and coaches offices. 
We have had representation and provided input on several proposed projects including new field 
space to be built with the new High School, the planned Ice Arena, and Rail Trail project. 

The Commission is working closely with the Town Administrator to develop a Master Plan 
that involves maintenance of all fields and playgrounds, capital expenses items, scheduling 
development of new programs and collaboration with all youth sports camps. In our ongoing effort 
to keep our sports facilities up to date, we have had tennis and basketball courts repaired and 
relined and several park fences replaced. 

The Commission wishes to thank the Board of Public Works, The Department of Public 
Works and their staff for the maintenance of equipment in our facilities. The Commission also 
wishes to thank the School Administration for use of their facilities. We also extend our thanks to 
the volunteer personnel needed to conduct our programs. 



118 



CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

John T. Kiely, Jr., Chairman 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio John F. Behen Jr. Elected 

Christopher Thomson, Elected Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. Appointed 

Richard P. DiPesa, Esq., Retirement Administrator 

Established in 1937, the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System is administered by 
a five-member Retirement Board and one full-time staff employee and one part-time employee. 
The Board is governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws and by the Public 
Employee Retirement Administration Commission, a state agency that provides guidance and 
oversight for 106 Massachusetts Retirement Boards. Membership in the plan is mandatory 
immediately upon commencement of employment for all permanent employees. The plan is a 
contributory defined benefit plan covering all Town employees deemed eligible by the 
Retirement Board, with the exception of schoolteachers, who contribute to the Massachusetts 
Teachers' Retirement Board. 

The System provides for retirement allowance benefits up to a maximum of 80% of a 
member's highest three-year average annual rate of regular compensation. Benefit payments 
are based upon a member's age, length of creditable service, salary and group classification. 
Members become vested after ten years of service. For certain hazardous duty and public 
safety positions, maximum retirement is at age 65. A retirement allowance consists of an 
annuity, which represents members' accumulated total deductions including interest and a 
pension portion, which is funded by the Town. The average retirement benefit is 80-85% 
pension 1 5-20% annuity. 

Active members contribute either 5,7,8 or 9% of their gross regular compensation to the 
Retirement System, determined by the date upon which the employee enters the service of the 
town. Any member hired after January 1, 1979 contributes an additional 2% on wages over $ 
30,000.00. 

As mandated by law, the Retirement Board has a fiduciary responsibility to the members 
and retirees of the system and to properly invest the fund's assets, totaling S23.46M. In order to 
properly invest the system's assets, the Retirement Board engages the service of an asset 
consultant, Segal Advisors and six investment managers, Chase Investment Counsel (large cap 
equities), State Street Global Advisors (international funds) and Wells Capital Management 
(fixed income securities), Gabelli Asset Management (small and mid-cap equities), Fox Asset 
Management (large cap equities) and a real estate manager, Intercontinental Real Estate 
Corporation. The Board also has an actuarial valuation performed every other year, the most 
recent being as of January 1 , 2002. According to the January 1 , 2002 valuation, the Retirement 
System is 61.5% funded vs. 66.3% as of January 1, 2000. The Unfunded Actuarial Liability is 
$18.4M. The System will be fully funded by the year 2028. 

During the period July 1, 2002-June 30, 2003, the Swampscott Retirement Board further 
diversified the management of the fund's assets by replacing State Street Global Advisors with 
Invesco of Atlanta, GA and Arnold S. Bleichroder of New York as international value and growth 
equities managers. 

In October 2002, an election was held, and the incumbent Board Member, John F. 
Behen, Jr. was re-elected by the members of the retirement system to serve until December 11, 
2005. In January 2003, the Retirement Board Members reappointed John T. Kiely, Jr., as Chair 
until January 2004. During the year 2002, the Contributory Retirement System ranked 19 th out of 
106 ,h in total return on investment of all of the Commonwealth's Contributory Retirement 
Systems. During the period July 1 , 2002-June 30, 2003, a total of 27 Members retired, 22 
of who elected to retire pursuant to the provisions of the Early Retirement Incentive Law. In 
addition, during this period, the Retirement System mourned the passing of eight of our Retirees, 
or their surviving spouses. 
Respectfully submitted, 
John T. Kiely, Jr., 
Chairman 



119 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
July 1, 2002 - June 30, 2003 

Chairman, Ms. Mary DeChillo 
Vice Chair, Mr. Arthur Goldberg 

Regular meetings, second and fourth Thursday of each month. 
Public is welcome. 

Dr. Brian C. Coughlin, Superintendent of Schools 596-8800 
Maureen Szymczak, Director of Pupil Personnel Services 596-8805 
Kevin Oliver, Asst. Supt for Business & Personnel 596-8802 

The office of the Superintendent of Schools, located at 207 Forest Avenue, is open every weekday from 
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 

Peter B. Sack High School 596-8830 

Ronald Landman, Ed.D. Middle School 596-8820 

Carolyn Murphy Clarke School 596-8812 

Lois Longin Hadley School 596-8847 

Kevin Cushman Machon School 596-8835 

Carla Guamieri Stanley School 596-8837 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the members of the Swampscott School Committee and to the citizens of Swampscott: I take great 
pleasure and genuine pride in presenting the Annual Report to the Town of Swampscott. 

I am proud to serve the Town of Swampscott and its most precious resource - the children. It is the 
Mission of the Swampscott Public Schools to promote excellence by providing a viable and comprehensive 
instructional program pre-kindergarten through grade twelve leading to the attainment of knowledge, 
competencies, and skills which, upon completion, will enable each student to function as a maximally 
competent citizen, worker and self-fulfilling individual. 

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the citizens of Swampscott for the support they have 
shown regarding the new Swampscott High School building project. When the new school is completed, it will 
be a reflection of the desire of the citizenry of this town to provide the best for its children. The school will 
represent a new beacon of learning which will make us all proud. 
PERSONNEL 

Listed below are the personnel changes that have taken place during the period 7/1/02 - 6/30/03. To those 
who have either resigned or retired, we would like to extend our sincere appreciation for their outstanding 
years of dedicated service to the children of Swampscott and to wish them much success in their future 
endeavors. 
CENTRAL OFFICE: 
SYSTEM WIDE: 
New Appointments: 

Mr. Valdimir Akim 
Retirements: 

Mr. Richard McQuade 
Resignations: 

None 
Leaves of Absence: 

Ms. Luz Quirk 
HIGH SCHOOL: 
New Appointments: 

Ms. Tracy Raposa 

Ms. Holly Tatum 

Ms. Lisa Kovacs 

Ms. Lisa Rapisarda 

Ms. Samantha Collins 

Ms. Sheri McDermott 



Ms. Meredith Greco Ms. Nancy Jo Kelly Ms. Laurie Mulsman 
Ms. Jane Watts 



Mr. 


Bernard Kravitz 


Ms. 


Martha Kellerher 


Ms. 


Denise Meyer 


Ms. 


Marisa Jackson 


Ms. 


Carolyn Labuda 


Ms. 


Jennifer McManus 


Mr. 


Kenneth Rideout 


Ms. 


Karin Orbon 


Ms. 


Maryellen Schepsis 


Ms. 


Kristen Inforzato 


Ms. 


Jennifer Selvo 


Ms. 


Terri Donovan 


Ms. 


Michele Demiere 


Ms. 


Marilyn Evans 


Ms. 


Barbara Hanko 


Ms. 


Jill Simmons 











120 



Ms. 
Ms. 



Resignations: 

Ms. Holly Brennan 

Mr. Scott Kaplan 
Transfers: 

Ms. Josephine Uminski 
Retirements: 

Mr. Thomas Maccarone 

Mr. Frank Grasso 
New ESP 

Ms. Barbara Hanko 

Ms. Carol King 

Ms. Brenda Samiljan 
Resignations ESP 

Mr. Steven Schwartz 

Mr. Christopher Balliro 
Transfers 

Mr. Brian Crescenzo 
Leaves of Absence 

Ms. Sara Meier 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 
New Appointments 

Ms. Judith Peitscher 

Ms. Lynn O'Donnell 

Ms. Cari Correnti-Wood Mr 
Resignations: 

Ms. Judith Peitscher 
Retirements: 

Ms. Susan Garcelon 
Leaves of Absence: 

Ms. Stacy Gauthier 
Transfers: 

Ms. Mary Lisa Brown 
New ESP's: 

Mr. Owen Hartnett 
Guidance Office Secy: 

Ms. Mary Lisa Brown 
CLARKE SCHOOL 
New Appointments: 

Ms. Gina Cobbett 
Resignation: 

Ms. Ann Bowen 
New ESP's: 

Ms. Heidi Legere 
HADLEY SCHOOL 
New Appointments: 

Ms. Bonnie Balzotti 

Ms. Valerie Grimes 

Ms. Tara McTernan-Coyle 
Leaves of Absence: 

Ms. Bridgett Ban- 
Ms. Lisa Bruhm 
Resignations: 

Ms. Anne Bowen 
Retirements: 

Ms. Susan Berry 
Transfers: 

None 



Kimberly Sokop 
Sarah Meier 



Mr. Wilbur Higgins 
Mr. Bryan Paquette 



Mr. Donald Streeter 


Ms. 


Susan Kalloch 


Ms. Mildred Cheever 


Ms. 


Patricia Maitland 


Mr. Mark Schwartz 


Ms. 


Marilyn Evans 


Ms. Carol King 


Ms 


Ancrea Katz 


Ms. Keelyn Welch 


Ms. 


Argy Pappas 


Ms. Carol King 


Ms. 


Jessica Maher 



Ms Lorraine Hodin 
Ms. Jami Mock 



Ms. Evelyn O'Connor 
Ms. Mary Spagnoli 

Mr Matthew Landman 
Ms. Jessica Maher 



Ms. Nancy O'Brien 



Mr. Jack Delaney 



Mr. 
Ms. 



Ms. 



Ms 



Ms. 



Ms. 



Ms. 



Kevin Rogers 
Jan Rushton 
Owen Hartnett 

Julie Walker 

Kathy Wrynn 

Cheryl Kirkpatrick 

Jan Rushton 

Mary Lisa Brown 



Ms. Lytania Mackey 
Mr. Todd Brown 
Ms. Lisa Oppenheim 

Ms. Donna Friedrich 

Ms. Kathy Urban 



Mr. Todd Brown 

Ms. Cari Carrenti-Wood 



Ms. Penny Munro 
Ms. Mary Brown 



Ms. Karen Hallion 



Ms. Emily Moore 



Ms. Leslie Kiely 



Ms 
Ms 



Jenna Bergman 
Deborah Hart 



Ms. Linda Burke 
Ms. Beth Karas 



Mr. Timothy Dewing Ms. Kelly Howells 



Ms. Janice Salemi 



Ms. Philip Clain 
Ms. Elizabeth Landry 



Ms. Kathleen Pigeon 



121 



MACHON SCHOOL 

New Appointments: 

Ms. Nicole Leclerc Ms. Virginia Lubrano Ms. Christine Morgan 
Leaves of Absence: 

None 
Retirements: 

None 
Resignations 

Ms. Mayumi Kato 
STANLEY SCHOOL 
New Appointments: 

Ms. Linda Coviello Ms. Allison Cohen Ms. Melissa DeMarsico Ms. Catherine Hainsworth 

Ms. Pamela Heller Ms. Celina Meilak Ms. Mary Mihovan Mr. Stephen O'Connell 

Ms. Laura Reis Ms. Jennifer Riebe Ms. Haera Tocco 

Retirements: 

Ms. Bettie Lou Popp 
Resignations: 

Ms. Jennifer Riebe 
Transfers: 

None 
Leaves of Absence 

Ms. Canice Thynne 

INSTRUCTION 

Some of the highlights for 2002-2003 in each school are as follows: 
HIGH SCHOOL 
MAJOR CHANGES 

Special Education Changes: Swampscott High School continues to focus its attention on students 
with specific learning disabilities. In order to maintain appropriate class sizes, we have added an additional 
Resource Room to the already existing moderate special needs classrooms within our school. These three 
moderate special needs classrooms combine with our Life Skills Program, our Learning Center and our 
Language Based classroom, to further meet the needs of our special education population. 

In addition to the creation of a sixth resource room at SHS, the SHS administration has requested, and 
the School Committee has supported, the hiring of three additional ESP's to be used in regular classrooms at 
SHS. We have hired three ESP's who will work within the areas of English, Science and Social Studies to 
address the educational needs of students in the mainstream classroom. These ESP's are primarily assigned 
to classes in which there are a large number of students with lEP's in an attempt to meet their needs and 
modify instruction in concert with their lEP's. 

Again this year, for the second year, each of our special education teachers are co-teaching English, 
Mathematics, Science and Social Studies alongside a regular education teacher to assist our students in 
courses with large numbers of special need students. 

A New Rotating Schedule : Students and teachers returned to school to a dramatically different 
Rotating Schedule. Unlike its predecessor that had a clearly defined morning, lunch and afternoon three-part 
rotation, the new schedule offers a rotation that is far more dramatic. At the request of most faculty, we have 
made every effort to provide a more dynamic rotation that has students and teachers meeting at different times 
of the day. Please note that the length of the day and lengths of the periods have not changed, but the order 
of the periods and the times that they occur throughout the day is significantly different. 

New Courses : Swampscott High School is pleased to announce the addition of the following courses 
to the High School Program of Studies. These courses are available to students on an elective basis. They 
are: ENGLISH: Creative Writing, Expository Writing; SOCIAL STUDIES: Social Issues and the Law, 
SCIENCE: Environmental Science, Astronomy; MUSIC: Piano Lab, American Music. 

Interdisciplinary Courses: In an attempt to more successfully meet the needs of students in 2-level 
English and Social Studies courses, new interdisciplinary courses have been created for 2-level students in 
English and Global Studies, Grade 9; English and Modern History, Grade 10; and English and United States 
History; Grade 11. 

The National Honor Society Qualifying Average : The National Honor Society Faculty Council voted to 
raise the National Honor Society qualifying average for the 2002-2003 school year to an unweighted 
cumulative grade point average of 90 or higher. In addition to having to maintain a higher GPA, students are 
also evaluated on the basis of character, leadership and service; the other three criteria considered essential 



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for induction in the National Honor Society. 

School Council Initiatives : The SHS School Improvement Plan for 2002 focused on six specific goals: 
Communication: 

• With respect to issues that may relate to broad educational policy, input should be sought from the 
faculty as a whole. Therefore, the School Council recommends the formation of a Faculty Forum, 
which would be comprised of one elected representative from each department. This Faculty Forum 
will meet monthly during the academic year and will meet with the high school principal at the end of 
each term. The principal will report the substance of these meetings to the School Council The 
School Council recommends the formation of this body by September 30, 2002. 

• The School Council welcomes and encourages the active dialogue that exists with the Parent 
Teacher Forum, and would like to encourage and welcome the participation of other independent 
groups, effective immediately. 

• The School Council recommends that a person be appointed for the ongoing updating and 
maintenance of the high school website to make it a useful, viable tool of communication - to be 
completed by September 30, 2002. 

Space: 

• As a result of ongoing School Council meetings, it has been determined that there is a critical shortage 
of instructional space at the high school; therefore, the School Council recommends the formation of a 
School Committee Task Force to determine what actions should be taken to resolve this crisis. Task 
Force to be formed by September 30, 2002. Task Force report to be completed by the end of the 
2002-2003 school year. 

Technology: 

• The School Council recommends that steps be taken to increase the inclusion of technology into the 
instructional process; therefore, the School Council suggests that the principal schedule mandatory 
in-service training for high school faculty specifically related to technology inclusion. It is also 
recommended that the training be structured to allow teachers to accumulate Professional 
Development Points (PDP's). To be completed during the 2002-2003 school year. 

Principal Search Committee: 

• The School Council recommends that a search committee be formed, including parents, teachers, 
students and community representatives who are viewed by the community as independent voices 
and as advocates for the high school's improvement, to search and select a new principal. The 
School Council feels strongly that the aforementioned committee be involved in the entire search 
process. To be accomplished in a timely fashion to ensure the high quality of potential applicants. 

MCAS Remediation: 

• To ensure optimal student performance, the School Council recommends that the MCAS Strategies 
classes (Math and English) be moved from first semester to second semester to provide sophomores 
with instruction up to the date of the test. To be implemented for the 2002-2003 school year. 

Achievement Awards: 

• The School Council recognizes the importance of honoring students for outstanding effort or 
improvement, as well as outstanding or unique achievement. The School Council recommends that a 
system be put in place whereby the principal will circulate a nomination form to administrators and 
faculty at the end of each quarter to nominate potential recipients for such an award. To be initiated at 
the beginning of the 2002-2003 school year. 

• Building Improvements 

School Council Initiatives: The Swampscott High School Improvement Plan for the year 2002-2003: 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 
School Council Goals: 

The Swampscott Middle School Council's goals for the 2003-2004 school year respond to the 
commitment to improve academic achievement, to provide support services, and to enrich the school 
community. This year's goals include the emphasis on study skills, increasing technology for instruction and 
communication with parents, mentor program, curriculum assessment and MCAS support. 
Key Points for 2001 -2002 School Council Plan 

Areas addressed through the 2001-2002 School Council Plan included improving communication 
between school and home through technology, initiating electronic grading, offering after-school programs, 
preparing students for MCAS, and identifying the instructional accommodations in the facility. 

Each of these goals was addressed with specific strategy. In response to the commitment of 
improving communication between school and home, the Swampscott Middle School now has a website 



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(swampscottms.net) and a database for assignments and announcements (homeworknow.com). Another goal 
was met as the teachers electronically transferred their grades to the school's mainframe. The third goal of 
offering an after-school program was realized with an eight-week program offering sixteen activities. In 
addition, the goal to prepare students for MCAS resulted in presenting testing strategies, purchasing relevant 
materials, and reviewing previous test items. The final goal of identifying the facility's ability to accommodate 
the current educational demands constant assessment and requests. 
Curriculum and Staff Development Programs: 

Anxiety or rejection is the greatest obstacle for change and progress. To relieve these issues among 
the faculty, Dr. Spencer Johnson's Who Moved My Cheese? was a recommended reading and frequently 
discussed at faculty meetings. 

This laid the groundwork for continuing to integrate technology in the classrooms and school. 
Offerings included "Hodge Podge of Technology in the Classroom," Power Point instruction and Grade Quick. 
Teachers also participated in workshops for improving communication and behavior, behavioral and 
medication interventions, classroom management, student assessment, strengthening English and Social 
Studies instruction, and Technology Education instruction. 
Student Programs and Activities 

The addition of the eight-week after-school program provided students an opportunity to increase 
academic, physical and social participation. Students also participated in programs to cultivate a commitment 
to charity as they raised funds and contributions for can food drive during Thanksgiving, Toys for Local Tots, 
Pennies for Patients, clothing for abused woman/children, and supplies for the troops in Iraq. In addition, the 
students enjoyed educational enrichment from trips to numerous cultural and educational sites, e.g. the 
aquarium, releasing salmon fry into a New Hampshire river, and George's Island in Boston Harbor. 
PTO Activities 

The Swampscott Middle School PTO hosts seven meetings during the school year. Each meeting 
presents an invited guest speaker to discuss topics relevant to parents and community members. For 
example, this year's guests included the town manager, the school's guidance counselors, and school's food 
service manager. In addition, the PTO contributes funding for assemblies; field trips and staff team building 
events that are advantageous to the students' learning experience. Two examples of their contributions are 
the assemblies by an actress being Emily Dickinson and the play "Justice at War." Finally, the PTO also 
provides the "Sixth Grade Fun Night: and the Sunday morning "Family Breakfast." 
CLARKE SCHOOL 
GOALS OF SCHOOL COUNCIL 

The School Council will develop a needs assessment survey to receive valuable input to help write the 
next school improvement plan for 2003-2004. The assessment was done in the spring of 2003. The Clarke 
School Improvement Plan will be a collaborative effort among the staff, school council, parents, student and 
the principal that reflects the needs of our school as a result of surveys, interviews, test results, work samples 
and observations. 

KEY POINTS IN SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 

The 2002-2003 Plan focused on the following five goals: 

• Staff will continue to teach students to write well-organized, fully developed compositions with 
comprehensive supporting details and a clear focus to help meet the state standards across the 
curriculum with an emphasis on content areas. 

• Staff will continue to teach students to use problem solving, communicating, reasoning and connecting 
to explore, develop, investigate, and know: number sense; patterns, relations and functions; geometry 
and measurements; and statistics and probability to meet the demands of MCAS testing. 

• Use of technology as an essential teaching tool across the curriculum 

• The building and grounds will continue to be repaired to reflect pride in our school 

• Clarke students will continue to exhibit age appropriate social and conflict resolution skills that 
demonstrate an increased understanding and respect for diversity. 

MAJOR SCHOOL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

Clarke School is on-line (11/02) thanks to Sarah Zam, librarian/media specialist. She designed our 
web page and continues to update it. Third grade students continue to coordinate and implement our weekly 
recycling program. Recess Walking Club was organized and run. Pictures for school-wide yearbook were 
taken during the year. Kindergarten teachers held a "Popsicles in the Park (8/02) for incoming students and 
parents as an orientation. Kindergarten classes visited Brooksby Farms (9/02) as part of their social studies 
program. They also visited the fire station (10/02). The 14 th Annual thanksgiving Feast for the entire school 
was held on 11/19. It was a success and represented Clarke School's family spirit. The school community 



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had a food and clothing drive to benefit My Brother's Table in Lynn and "The Inn Between" in Peabody. Clarke 
School Curriculum Night was held and well attended (9/02). Grades 3-5 went to the Tsongas Center (10/02) 
as part of their social studies curriculum. Grade 3 went to the Peabody Essex Museum (1 1/02) to supplement 
their social studies curriculum. Grade 5 Leaders' Club participated in Toys for Local Children. They collected 
money and toys, helped shop for toys and helped to wrap and deliver them (12/02). 

Skills for Life program continues to part of the Clarke School culture. Emphasis is placed on using 
self-control to "I will wait my turn to speak." Also, the daily pledge and self-control times are part of our daily 
routine. Community Service Learning Projects were done. A Book Brigade (11/02) was held and books 
collected and donated to Lynn Community Health Center. Socks were collected for the Bridge House in Lynn 
(a family shelter). Our Open House, "Bring Your Family Back to School Night" (1/03) presented a display of 
children's accomplishments. Families visited all classrooms and met the staff. Grades 4 and 5 participated in 
the National Geography Bee (1/03). Grade 1 (2/03) performed the play, "Penguins on Parade" in conjunction 
with their science and language arts curriculum. Grade 5 Leaders' Club continues to run our after-school 
Homework Club three days a week. Clarke School participated in the SEABOARD fundraiser. Jake 
McDougall, grade 4, represented Clarke School (3/03) at the Annual Lynn Daily Item's Spelling Bee. Grades 3 
and 4 participated in keyboarding classes. Kindergarten teachers organized and ran Kindergarten Orientation 
and Visitation Day for parents and children (5/03). Grade 5 participated in the DARE Program (5/03). 
Kindergarteners presented the show (4/03) "Our World of Color." Readiness skills were reinforced. 

Grade 3 performed (4/03) in the production of "Mastering Massachusetts." This was part of the 
curriculum frameworks. Grade 5 went on a whale watch (5/03) as part of their end of the year program. They 
also toured Town Hall. Grade 2 visited The Butterfly Place (6/03) as part of their science curriculum studies. 
The Clarke School Science Fair for Grades 3-5 was held. Students shared projects with other students, 
parents, and staff. Clarke fifth graders again participated in Student/Staff Switch Day (6/03). The Annual 
Awards Assembly for grades 4-5 was held. The elementary advanced band performed their concert (6/03). 
Grade 5 students presented an outstanding Moving On Program for their parents and grade 4 students (6/03). 

Clarke School's Extended Day/After School and Early Morning Programs continue to grow. 
Kindergarten classes and grade 3, 4, and 5 classes have collaborated to form "Learning Buddies" for math and 
reading. A SUCCESS grant was awarded to grade one teachers for "Poetry Across the Curriculum." 
SUCCESS also awarded all four elementary schools a $10,000 grant for the Guided Reading Grant. An All 
School Farewell Assembly was held on the last day of school. 
PTA ACTIVITIES 

PTA Playground Committee met and began fund raising to refurbish Abbott Park Playground during 
the school year. Julia Thacker was poet in residence in 10/02 and 5/03. The PTA Cultural Arts funded a 
performance of Gabriela Mistral, and Hispanic poet who won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1945. Clarke 
School Halloween party was held on 10/02 at SHS. The PTA ran a gift warp fundraiser (10/02). The PTA 
sponsored a Chess Club for grades 4 and 5. Clarke School held its Book Fair in 11/02. The PTA sponsored 
the Holiday Fair (12/02). An Art Appreciation Program was given by local artist, Karin Doben (2/03). The PTA 
funded an after school course to strengthen math and test taking skills needed to improve MCAS performance. 
The PTA again sponsored the Cow Plop Country Fair (5/03) and raised a great deal of money. David Darling, 
cellist, visited the Clarke School. The PTA sponsored the Annual Beach Day picnic (6/03). Clarke School 
participated in the annual July 4 th Parade (7/02). The PTA continues to sun after school classes and activities. 
The PTA established the first Clarke PTA Scholarship for a graduating senior who attended Clarke. The 
scholarship is for $1200. 

CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

Elementary staff participated in our Early Release Day Program for Staff Development. PROJECT 
READ, Enhancing Writing Instruction, STC science kits, technology, special education topics and hands-on 
math strategies were covered. Ann Bowen, art specialist, coordinated and ran staff development for the 
elementary art program. The group revised the elementary K-5 art curriculum to align with state curriculum 
frame works. Carolyn Murphy attended the MESPA Spring Conference (5/03) where Dr. Douglas Reeves was 
the keynote speaker. Other staff members attended summer technology courses, reading recovery 
workshops, etc. Several primary teachers participated in study groups during the 2002-2003 school year. 
They included Assistive Technology, Social Studies Curriculum Revision and ESP Handbook. Many teachers 
participated in Summer Institutes 2003. 
HADLEY SCHOOL 
GOALS OF SCHOOL COUNCIL 

To provide a range of perspectives on challenges facing the schools as well as advise and collaborate 
with the principal in developing and implementing the School Improvement Plan. 



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SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN GOALS 

To provide for student wellness by enhancing current curriculum with increased integration of art, 
music and physical education. 

To build and/or strengthen alliances between the Hadley School Community and the community at 
large and outside agencies. 

To address children's learning styles and developmental needs through a variety of teaching 
techniques and provide children with the opportunity to reach their highest level of achievement 

To maintain and repair the facility and enhance the appearance of Hadley School to reflect an 
atmosphere that is conducive to excellence in learning. 
CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

Continued training of Project Read - Written Expression Grade K-2 

Writing Training for grade 3 teachers 

Study Group aligning state Language Arts Frameworks with Swampscott Public Schools curriculum 

Study Group aligning state Social Studies Frameworks with Swampscott Public Schools curriculum 

Grade level meetings to discuss grade level issues 

Classroom management training 

Monthly Character Value Adoption 

Hadley Shine 
STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

Student Council, Chorus, D.A.R.E., Basketball, Recycling, Reading Buddies, Homework Club, K-Door 
Greeters, Grade Level Community Service, School Store, Halloween Parade, Enrichment Classes, 
Thanksgiving feast, field trips, Literacy Celebration, Grade Level Student Performances, Donations to NSCH, 
Swampscott Council on Aging, Troop's Overseas, Hadley "Hoop-it-Up" Science Fair, Geography Bee, Battle of 
the Books, Spelling Bee, 100 Day Celebration, Salvation Army Food Drive, Fun Field Day, Clean-Up Fall and 
Spring, Student Council activities, Jump Rope for Heart, Pennies for Leukemia, Hadley Shine Committee, 
Decorations Committee, TLC. 
PTA ACTIVITIES 

Kindergarten Picnic, Halloween Haunt, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, Magazine Drive, Wrapping Paper 
Drive, Yearbook, PTA Dinner, Parent Place, After School Programs, Teacher Wish List, Hadley Hoop-it-Up, 
Playground Fund, Volunteer Program, Hadley Gardening Club, Spring Clean-Up, Spring Arts Festival, Phone 
Pals, A+ America, Box Tops for Education, Hadley Shine Committee, S.A.I.L., Continental Math League, 
Hadley Herald. 
ENRICHMENT 

Bay Colony Educators, Odyssey Live, Native American Perspectives, Art Quest, Puppeteer, Museum of 
Fine Arts, Museum of Science, Family Ties, Semenya McCord Gospel Program, Audubon, Nahant Marine 
Biological Center, Lydia Pinkham, Kids on the Block, and Giles La Roche. 
MACHON SCHOOL 
Curriculum and Program Highlights: 

Reading and writing curriculum continues to be the major curriculum focus at Machon. Teachers 
share pedagogical philosophies, teaching strategies and materials. There is a school wide initiative towards 
improved reading scores and practical, everyday usage. Specific reading services begin in the classroom with 
teacher directed group lessons tailored to meet individual skill acquisitions. Elementary staff has received 
training in the "Project Read" methodology. Some support staff services have been reviewed and re- 
coordinated to better meet the needs of those children who display reading skills acquisition challenges. 
Throughout the school year staff has met to create an outcome based systemic approach to writing skills. 
Adjustments have been made to ensure the writing continuum makes sense and that there re no gaps from 
grade to grade. 

Mathematics represents one of Machon School's priorities. Teachers utilize a "maintenance" 
approach to daily homework in order to avoid the "We never learned that" response. Teachers also 
incorporate a "math minute fact test" drill each day. This mechanism, coupled with math fact review at home 
will assist students with the fact families. Teachers in grades 1-5 now employ daily timed math fact tests. 
Marked improvement in algorithmic work has been noted due to math fact development. 

Machon School has continued integrating technology into our curricula. Students in grades 3-5 work 
to produce quality PowerPoint presentations reflecting the MASS S.S. Frameworks. Students investigated 
national monuments, explorers and personalities from the American Revolution, synthesizing what they 
learned and extrapolated that into PowerPoint presentations. Staff also employed technology for writing. This 
powerful teaching tool has significantly improved student writing at Machon. 
2002-2003 THEMES: "PRACTICE RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS AND CHARACTER" 



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SCHOOL COUNCIL GOALS: 

This year the School Council will focus on school budget and will look at the bullying issue Over the 
last 12 months the Council has generated a student survey on conflict resolution. This year the Council 
examined communication and the bullying issue. Support materials for teachers have been added to our 
inventory. Our adjustment counselor works with individual classes to discuss social issues. 
KEY POINTS OF SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN - Six Primary Goals 

Curricular: Reading instruction - review and adapt current reading instruction to better meet the 
needs of Machon students. Expand reading instruction time. Expand the selection of books in the Machon 
Library Use of technology to improve skills. MCAS improvement. 

General: Improve/enhance community involvement at Machon 
CURRICULUM & STAFF INVOLVEMENT : 

Reading and writing instruction has to be addressed both through faculty meetings and ongoing 
discussions. The staff created a K-5 continuum. Machon staff participated in many professional development 
opportunities offered by the system. Staff are also attending commercial conferences on a host of topics 
ranging from dealing with difficult students to the use of graphic organizers throughout the curricula. Machon 
staff has participated in "Project Read" training. Additionally, Machon staff will participate in a study group that 
will attempt to familiarize them with Network Administrator, computer lab management software. Selected 
staff will also participate in discipline/restraint training. 
STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

Machon Student Council is an enthusiastic group of involved students. They hosted two bake sales 
and are working on a school-wide time capsule. Machon's "Before School Program" offers parents and 
children with alternatives to day care. Machon School initiated a School Breakfast Program. The program's 
success is heartening. Machon children and staff communicate student progress and classroom initiatives 
with the monthly newsletter, "The Machon Messenger." Machon students participated in a summer long 
Reading Olympics. Collectively, students read almost 2,000 hours and raised more than $2000 for the school. 
Due to their efforts the school received a 27" TV, monitor, a VCR, a TV cart and a computer. 
PTA ACTIVITIES 

The Machon PTA is an active and supportive arm of the school. The PTA offers many enrichment 
programs to the Machon students. This year the Machon PTA increased their allotments for 
cultural/enrichment programs by three-fold. A total of $3500 will be earmarked for these enrichment programs. 
The PTA sponsored a number of Cultural Arts assemblies. They included Irish music performance, the life of 
Helen Keller, Opera to Go, Science Isn't Pretty, Storytellers, Bay Colony Players, Hampstead Players, Pizza & 
Movie Nights, Kids on the Block, Audubon Arc, and Native American Perspectives. 
STANLEY SCHOOL 
SCHOOL THEME 

Learning and Caring Count at Stanley continues to be our theme. Students continue to commit 
random acts of kindness and many other organized community service activities were planned for student 
participation and fundraising. Students in Grades 1-5 participated in the St. Jude Hospital Math-A-Thon. 
Students also raised money for Cystic Fibrosis and for the Lymphoma Society. An after-school foreign 
language program has been begun as an enhancement to our Enrichment Program, which is sponsored by 
the PTA. Global Child - a foreign language instruction program for students began in 3/30 and ran through 
5/03. Students in K-3 participated. The program will run again in 9/03 and it will be opened to students from 
all of the elementary schools. We continued our Homework Club. Grade 1 students conducted their annual 
canned food drive at Thanksgiving and donated proceeds to a food pantry. They collected linens and clothing 
for the homeless. Gift certificates to Johnnie's Foodmaster were purchased for senior citizens. Many other 
community fund raising projects sere accomplished through students' efforts. Grade 5 students walk to the 
Swampscott Cemetery each May and place flags on veterans' graves. Grade 5 Leaders continue to be role 
models who demonstrate leadership and service while developing personal attributes. Leaders assume 
various responsibilities over the course of the year. 
STANLEY SCHOOL COUNCIL 

The Council meets throughout the year to assess needs of the school community and to establish a plan of 
action for school improvement. The Council developed a Needs Assessment and a Plan for School 
Improvement for 2002-2003, which included the following goals: Utilize technological tools to enhance teacher 
effectiveness and learning for each student. Utilize a variety of instructional strategies in order to address the 
needs of students to that each may achieve his/her potential. Upgrade, maintain and repair the Stanley school 
to maximize usable space in a facility, which is a safe, clean and pleasant working environment. Provide 
resources and support to parents. Shape and define the Stanley School Culture. We continue to work toward 
these identified long-term goals. 



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Programs, which enhance our schools, include: SPIRIT - Stanley Parents Inspire, Reinforce, Teach. This 
program was begun to organize parent volunteers for various activities. SPECIAL PROGRAMS - BEFORE 
SCHOOL RUN BY VOLUNTEERS. Parent volunteer coaches, teachers and the principal meet one morning a 
week to assist learning in the Continental Math League. One hundred and twenty students participate. 
NEWSPAPER CLUB: This before school program involves 45 students and many parents are involved. 
TECHNOLOGY UPDATE: Work continues to enhance our computer lab and to provide technological 
resources within the classroom setting. GRANT FUNDED PROGRAMS THAT ENHANCE OUR 
EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: Family Math and Science Night at Johnnie's Foodmaster were partially 
funded through a grant. Over 250 students participated in grades K-3. This is a successful town-wide event. 
Community Service Learning funds for Earth Week activities in April 2003 were obtained. Eisenhower funds 
provided training in math and science. The principal and one grade 3 teacher attended an NCTM Regional 
Conference in Montreal in 2002. 

CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

Teachers continue to be involved in various professional development activities. Teachers were trained in 
Project READ. Staff members take advantage of all professional development opportunities offered through 
the School Department and they participate in workshops and conferences held out of the district. One 
Stanley teacher sits on a state DOE MCAS committee and is correcting grade 4 tests and setting standards for 
the future. Teachers have been trained in the areas of Assessment, The Writing Process, and the Utilization 
of technology to enhance instruction 

STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES . Foodmaster K-3 Math and Science Night, Curriculum Night, Bring 
Your Parents Back to School Night, Incoming Grade 1 and K student and parent orientation, Geography Bee, 
Spelling Bee, DARE Graduation, Ranger Day Grade 5, Portfolio Sharing for Parents, Authors' Teas, Battle of 
the Books, Book Swap, Field Trips, Music Dept. concerts. Activities for Grade 5 Leader's Club, which included 
placement of flags on veterans' graves, TLC fund raising, Bake Sale, etc. PTA Activities included Pot Luck 
Dinner and Talent show, book fair, Holiday Fair, Annual Carnival, Clothing Drive, Grounds Beautification 
program, After School Enrichment Program, Walk-a-thon for Lymphoma. Cultural Arts/Enrichment Programs 
were also conducted. 
GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

At the beginning of the year counselors were primarily involved in resolving scheduling conflicts, college 
counseling, personal counseling, distribution of 504n Accommodation Plans and supervision of SAT and 
PSAT. 

During November and December the Guidance Department processed early decision and early 
applications and applications with an early January deadline. Approximately 40 college admission counselors 
visited SHS and met with students. The department hosted a financial aid seminar. MCAS retest was given 
and the ASVAB military test. "Freshman Experience" saw a record number of underclassmen attend. 

In January and February, college application process work continued. The department was involved with 
the new building plans and the new principal search process. 

In March and April scheduling and course selection work began. The MCAS Long Composition was 
scheduled and coordination and distribution of tests was carried out. College Fair invitations were mailed to 
325 colleges. 

The final two months of the year brought with them the main MCAS testing period, SAT and AP testing and 
college counseling with the juniors. The department was actively involved in seeing students and dealing with 
the many issues that occur each day in the lives of the student body. 
SPECIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Special Services provides ancillary and support services to the students within the 
Swampscott Public School System. These services include special education, screening and English as a 
Second Language. 

Special Education: While students were being supported in Swampscott, changes continued to occur at the 
State Department of Education. The Student Information Management System (SIMS) report required by the 
state replaced the October 1 Report in 2001. According to the December 1, 2001 head count of special 
education students, 258 resident student sin Swampscott received some form of special education services. 
This represents 15.2% of all Swampscott students and 12.9% of the school-age population attending schools 
in the Swampscott School System. These numbers reflect a decrease of 15 students from the previous year's 
December 1 headcount. Swampscott's percentage of special needs students remains below the state 
average. 

Most of the special needs students receive their instruction in the mainstream general education program. 
This is accomplished by providing support services within the regular classroom through the use of aides and 
services. Frequently, special educators and aides provide direct support services in the regular education 



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classroom. Other students have their needs met through accommodations and modifications of the general 
curriculum and/or environment. Other students attend resource rooms that are available in all of our schools. 
The school system has several Learning Center Programs. These are located from the elementary through 
the high school levels and meet the identified needs of students who require a more substantive amount of 
their instruction within a special education setting. The new Language Based Learning Center that opened at 
SHS in September 2001 has a special education teacher, an educational support professional and a part time 
speech and language pathologist who provides direct educational support services to identified students. Two 
new Communication and Social Skills programs that opened at the Hadley and Stanley schools have been 
designed to serve students identified with autism spectrum disorders. Students are mainstreamed to the 
greatest extent possible based upon their lEP's. Support services have enabled the school system to retain 
students within the district. 

The Life Skills Class at SHS is expanding. Students receive functional academics, vocational training and 
experiences and practical life skills education. Students are mainstreamed into academic classes and 
electives as appropriate. The new school store, developed through the award of a SUCCESS grant was 
opened. A Life Skills Scholarship, using school store proceeds, will be given for the first time this year to a 
deserving graduating senior who plans to enter the field of education. Swampscott supports an integrated 
preschool program. This program is located at SHS and provides direct support services to students aged 
3-5. In February 2003 a second integrated preschool classroom was approved and opened at SHS. 

Currently, 28 students or 1 .2% of the total school population are placed in programs outside of Swampscott 
since their special needs warrant more specialized programming than is available within the district. Most of 
these students are children with multiple handicaps, serious emotional/behavioral disturbances, brain injury 
and severe autism. Swampscott is keeping pace with the state and national trend of serving more students 
with more significant disabilities. The greatest barrier at present is the lack of space available for program 
development within our school buildings. 

The year 2000 brought about significant change to the state laws governing special education and 603CMR 
28.00 is now the special education law of Massachusetts, replacing Chapter 766. The 1997 reauthorization of 
the Individuals with Disabilities Act focused on four main areas: (1) strengthening parental participation in the 
education process, (2) accountability for student participation and success in the general education curriculum 
and mastery of IEP goals and objectives, (3) remediation and disciplinary actions addressing behavior 
problems at school and in the classroom, and (4) responding to the needs of a more diverse society. Some of 
the highlights of the MA changes are as follows: (1) a new individualized education program (IEP) has been 
adopted and implemented (2) eligibility for special education has been more clearly defined. For the first time, 
students must be identified with a specific disability to be eligible for special education, Disability categories 
include: autism, developmental delay, intellectual, sensory: hearing, vision or deaf-blind, neurological, 
emotional, communication, physical, specific learning disability or health. Categories are the same as the 
federal definitions for disabilities; (3) as a result of the disability, the student must require specialized 
instruction not available within the general education classroom. 

A sliding fee scale has been established for parents who seek public funding for independent educational 
services. There is a change in the MA standard from "maximum possible development" to "Free and 
appropriate public education" reflecting federal language. The law requires the district to develop a 
Curriculum Accommodation Plan" in an effort to ensure all efforts have been med to meet students' needs 
within the general education environment. The law mandates no child be exempt from assessment programs. 
The Alternate Assessment for MCAS has been designed at the state level and is in use again this year. 

Teachers and administrators of the school system continue to be supportive of the inclusion of children with 
special needs in the school and in the classrooms. Ongoing training efforts in Autism/PDD were expanded 
and provided to staff across the system as this population continues to increase locally. 

In May 2002 the school system underwent a Coordinated Program Review from the State Department of 
Education. A team of five State Department of Education employees visited our schools for eight days. They 
observed programs, reviewed records and interviewed teachers, parents, educational support professionals, 
speech and language therapists, occupational and physical therapists, school psychologists and 
administrators. 

Grants To supplement the local budget, the Special Education Department applied for and received four 
noncompetitive grant allocations. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ALLOCATION GRANT: 
$18,659. This grant has allowed Swampscott to continue its integration efforts at the preschool level IDEA - 
Special Education Entitlement: $342,348. This federal entitlement was used to fund a full time school 
psychologist position and eighteen educational support professionals. Consultants, workshops and 
conferences were also funded through this grant. SPED Professional Development: $25,267. Funds were 
used to purchase training supplies, to provide consultants and speakers and for staff and administrators' 



129 



attendance at workshops and conferences. EARLY CHILDHOOD TRAINING: Curriculum and IEP Study 
Groups: $3,000. This grant provided funding for stipends for study group participants, supplies and teaching 
resources and materials to coordinate the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks at the preschool level in 
science and history. 

English as a Second Language : ESL is required in the public schools for students whose native language is 
other than English and who have yet to demonstrate English language proficiency to the level necessary for 
independent academic success. Swampscott has offered ESL tutoring for the past 1 3 years. 
Screening: This is required for all entering kindergarten children. It is a brief assessment of developmental 
skills. The purpose of the screening is to identify the possible presence of special needs. Areas screened 
include articulation, language, auditory perception, visual perception, vision and hearing acuity, fine motor, 
gross mother and visual mother. According to special education laws, early childhood screening is available 
to three and four year old children whose parents suspect the presence of a special need in any of the areas 
listed above. Any parent who suspects his/her child has a special need and wishes to have their child 
screened should contact the Special Services Office to schedule an appointment. 
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health The Health Education Department of the Swampscott Public Schools provides students with a 
comprehensive K-12 health curriculum taught by certified health educators. At the elementary level, a health 
educator provides health education classes to students in grades K-5 visiting classrooms on a biweekly basis. 
Grade 5 classes also have DARE classes taught by the Police Department's DARE officer. Elementary school 
nurses also provide educational instruction including co-taught programs such as the puberty program in 
grades four and five. The middle school has a comprehensive health education curriculum for students in 
grades 6-8 on an eighteen-day specialist rotation. At the high school students are required to take one 
semester of health in their freshman or sophomore years and another semester of Lifetime Health and Fitness 
in either their junior or senior years. The junior/senior wellness course integrates health and physical 
education curriculum and is co-taught by a health and physical education instructor. 

In addition to health educators, school nurses are valuable resources who provide medical attention and 
individualized educational services to students and staff. They conduct vision, hearing and scoliosis 
screenings, immunizations, medical record keeping, referrals, special education home assessments, and 
direct medical services to students and staff. The nurses are also critical components of each school's Crisis 
Response Team and work with school administrators and guidance to provide socio-emotional support to 
students as they transition through the school system. 

The Health Education Department actively pursues and receives grant support through state and federal 
programs. These programs are developed and administered with direction from the Swampscott Health 
Advisory Board. The board met quarterly this year and has recently assessed program needs through the 
administration of the Youth risk Behavior Survey in June 2003. The results will be available in the fall and will 
be used to monitor trends in student risk behaviors, adjust curriculum emphasis and provide quantitative data 
for future grant proposals. 
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

The Athletic Department coordinated 18 varsity teams as well as 20 sub-varsity and freshman teams at 
SHS this year. A new era in Athletics began with the combined Marblehead/Swampscott Wrestling Team. 
The MIAA approved this merger, which may lead to other combined programs between the school systems. A 
cooperative gymnastic team with Marblehead was formed this year along with a Girls' Club Lacrosse Team. 

Accomplishments during the year included Northeast Conference Championships in Football, Boys' 
Basketball and Co-ed Swimming and seven of the varsity athletic teams qualified for state tournament play. A 
Northeast Conference showed a record of six SHS students named Northeast Conference Most Valuable 
Player of the Year. The Varsity Basketball Cheerleaders were crowned Conference Champions. 

The middle school athletic program includes soccer, cross country, track, boys' and girls' basketball, field 
hockey, ice hockey and softball. 

Many of our coaches and athletes received special recognition. Two coaches received Coach of the Year 
Awards. The Athletic Department sponsored a cookout for all athletes and their parents to begin the school 
year. All rules, regulations and expectations are reviewed at this time. 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

The Physical Education Department continues to provide a comprehensive program to all students grades 
Pre-K through 12. We continue to update and to adapt our Physical Education and Project Adventure 
curriculum to meet the changing needs and interests of our students and to support the development of 
healthy attitudes toward their physical, social, emotional and mental wellness. Highlights of 2002-2003 include 
having staff member, Kathy Pacitto, named Educator of the Year by the SEA and sending out all Presidents' 
Challenge Physical Fitness scores home to parents of children in grades 4-11. The result sheet also 



130 



included comments on how each area of fitness could be improved 
SWAMPSCOTT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS ANNUAL REPORT 

Overall Maintenance of the Buildings: Over this past year over 20,000 sq. ft. of ceiling tiles were installed 
throughout the school system. More than 400 new energy efficient fixtures were installed and more than 1500 
energy efficient ballasts were installed. This will help lower the cost of electricity Mass Electric and the DOE 
helped to defray the cost of the replacement of the fixtures and ballast. Mass Electric also agreed to pay for 
the disposal of the old ballasts. Steam traps were replaced at many of the buildings This will help to reduce 
heating costs. The buildings in the school system are very old and maintenance workers work very hard to 
keep these buildings up to par. Boilers at the Middle, Machon and Clarke Schools are more than 50 years old 
and it is a large undertaking to keep them running. In spite of this, over the last five years not one day of 
school has been lost due to heating problems. New boilers have been installed at the Hadley, Stanley and 
High School. Roofs on the various buildings have had major repairs over the past five years. 
Stanley School: Replaced portions of hung ceiling in basement; pulled out rug in computer room and replaced 
with tile floor; installed new air conditioners; removed dead trees from rear of the building; pointed stairs; 
repaired outside bulkhead; replaced gutters and facial boards; worked on swing sets in the rear of the school; 
changed steam traps. 

Machon School: Painted classrooms; new ceilings in lobby, kindergarten, bathrooms and teachers' lunch 
room, pnnci8pal's office, nurse's office, copying room, and secretaries office; new parabolic efficient lights 
were installed in these rooms with new energy efficient ballast in corridors; new parabolic energy efficient 
fixtures in all corridors and stairways in old wing and energy efficient ballast in basement, boiler room and 
library; removed asbestos from areas of old wing; replaced hot water heater in portable classroom, new sump 
pump installed in boiler room; sealed off boiler room from rest of the building. 

High School: installation of new ceilings and energy efficient lights in first floor of the Shaw Wing, cafeteria, 
teachers' room, and English office; refurbished graphic arts room to make a pre-school room and moved 
graphic arts to industrial arts area; repaired roof leaks; created new closet under stairway in new wing; 400 
new energy efficient ballasts installed; 50 new parabolic fixtures installed; teachers' room, English department 
and parts of the library repaired after flood. 

Middle School: Areas in this building range from 70 years of age to 100 years of age and work is constantly 
being done to keep the building open and functioning. Energy efficient lights and ballasts have been installed; 
work has been done on the boilers, etc. 

Clarke School: Removed all asbestos from boilers and boiler room; installed new sections in boilers; installed 
over 10,000 sq. ft. of new ceilings in all classrooms; installed energy efficient fixtures in all classrooms; 
removed oil piping in boiler room; painted five classrooms; installed new safety controls on boilers; removed 
carpets and installed new tile floors in portable classrooms; installed new air conditioners, installed new 
handicapped ramp to portable classrooms; installed new floor in reading room; repaired six classroom floors; 
changed 95% of steam traps. 

Hadley School: Installed energy efficient lights and bailasts in classrooms and offices; painted corridors; 
installed new ceilings in cafeteria, principal's office, nurse's office, secretary's storage rooms in main building; 
installed new ceiling in basement annex, first grade sped room and corridor; repaired water leak under floor in 
annex; installed new exhaust system in old wing; installed new exhaust grates in classrooms; changed steam 
traps in basements of old building and annex. 



131 



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132 



TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 



This year in has been one of great improvements within the technology department. Our 
town fiber network is now in place and being utilized by our Town Hall, Fire Department, Police 
Department, Library, Senior Center, High School and our Town Hall Annex. The sharing of files 
and databases are only some of the benefits that we are now able to utilize. Internet access 
Email is available and being used more everyday. Our first public use PC has been installed into 
our Senior Center and should prove to be a valuable resource for the Senior Citizens of 
Swampscott. The benefits from improved communications within our departments will have 
positive effects in streamlining our day-to-day operations. Our Munis system has undergone 2 
major software revisions, which has improved usability for our employees. We are in the process 
of implementing our GEOTMS software that will serve our DPW, Health, Fire, and Assessing 
departments. The software will handle all building permits, fire permits, and complaint tracking as 
well as a host of other services. This will be a vast improvement over the older more traditional 
methods for handling our data as well as cutting down on the amount of paper we use. Our Fire 
Department has gone live with its own website. This site provides information on fire logs and 
current news/events within the department. We have improved our Town Website by changing 
hosting providers. This change has given us a new support level for our site and has given us the 
ability to provide more information online. Forms, calendars, bylaw and warrant information, as 
well as public bulletin boards are just some of the new information being provided online. We 
have also made strides to audit every piece of technology equipment down to the very last 
printer. This is an ongoing process that in the end will provide a way to gauge where upgrades 
are needed most as well a means to track trends in system failures so we can take advantage of 
existing warranties. 

For the year to come our plans include building an exchange server for improvements in 
communications and our "POP3" email method we are currently using. We will have the ability to 
use a real time calendars and secure instant messaging. This proves valuable in keeping users 
on the same page throughout the town. We plan to implement Munis terminals in our remote 
locations to help those departments track budgets more efficiently. Our Fire Department will be 
seeing vast improvements in their inspection process with the implementation of handheld PDA 
devices. These devices will be able to interface with, and upload inspection forms to our 
GEOTMS database. Engine 22 will be receiving a hardened laptop to serve up data on structures 
and hydrant locations in real time. This will involve taking existing assessing and inspection info 
provided on our map plates and modifying them for use within the Fire Department. This info is 
crucial to our officers when planning how attack fires and needs to be delivered in a speedier 
fashion than outdated paper book methods. This will set a new standard in safety that 
Swampscott provides to its firemen. Though in the infancy stages, there are plans to implement 
this technology on existing systems within our Police Department. The Fire Department website 
will be providing forms and information on inspections in the future as well. Our next initiative of 
the year is to upgrade existing server and desktop operating systems to a minimum of Windows 
2000 Professional (desktop) and Windows Server 2003 (servers). In turn this will provide 
enhanced security, scalability, and less down time to our network. The end result is a 99.5 % 
"uptime" for desktops and 99.9% for servers as certified by Microsoft. At some point this year 
depending on the feedback I receive, I would also like to hold a few classroom dates for town 
employees and the public as well. This would consist of Q&A to help folks with any issues they 
may have with PC's either in the office or home. In turn this could provide a great resource for 
learning how to our people more efficient through the use of technology. 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Michael Donovan 
Network Specialist 



133 



TRAFFIC STUDY COMMITTEE 

The Traffic Study Committee from July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2003 held ten (10) 
meetings. 

During the aforementioned, we discussed many requests from residents such as: 
Speeding, parking, stop signs and dead-end signs. 

The areas involved were the streets they lived on, to business areas, to the rail station 
section. All these problems were discussed with the people requesting changes. Some were 
approved, some were not. Others were recommended at Selectmen's meetings and public 
meeting were held to discuss the changes. 

Meetings were also held with several Boards; however, the committee would request to 
be made aware of any parking problems that could arise in a more timely fashion. 

We are available to consult with any and all residents, Boards, etc. at any time. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Sid Novak, Chairperson 



134 



OFFICE OF VETERANS SERVICES 

The Office of Veterans Services was established and mandated by the Massachusetts Legislature under 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. This office was established to provide any and all assistance 
to veterans and their families and to assure that they receive all benefits that they may be entitled to, 
either through the Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services, the United States Veterans 
Administration, the Social Security Administration and any other Governmental agency or pnvate 
organization designed to provide assistance to our veterans. All financial aid disbursements from this 
office to needy veterans and their families are eligible for a 75% reimbursement from the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts providing the proper monthly application has been made. Since taking this post in 
September of 1993 I have aggressively pursued reimbursement of the funds which we are entitled to 
receive and we currently stand at 100%. One of the most sought after benefits is for Military Honors at a 
veteran's funeral. We are losing an average of over 1000 veterans a day in the United States, and with a 
vast majority of our active and reserve servicemen and women currently serving overseas in Iraq we have 
had to work closely with the local veteran organizations and the funeral homes, who are also well 
prepared for this request, to ensure that a veterans last request is honored. We have been relatively 
fortunate regarding the number of residents seeking assistance, however with the war on terrorism and 
the war in Iraq still very active the number of veterans will increase drastically as our servicemen and 
women return home. 

VETERANS AFFAIRS COMMITTEE 

The Veterans Affairs Committee was formed as a vehicle to keep the veteran and their deeds to preserve 
our freedoms at a heightened state of awareness. To achieve this goal the committee has held 
numerous Armed Forces Day parades with many notable participants including The 2nd Marine Division 
Band, General John J. Sheehan, Supreme Allied Commander of NATO Atlantic forces, General Butch 
Neal, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, Medal of Honor recipient Mr. Raymond Clausen, 
Retired General and Swampscott Native Paul Gorman to name a few. Swampscott has been visited by 
two naval ships over the past few years as well as numerous military vehicles and aircraft, this is all done 
through the Veterans Affairs Committee and made possible by the generous donations of the residents of 
Swampscott. One of the bigger projects of the committee was to replace the vandalized Vietnam 
Veterans Honor Roll. On this past Veterans Day, 11 November 2002, that goal came to fruition as a 
black granite honor roll was unveiled on Monument Avenue directly behind the World War I Honor Roll 
and large flagpole. Our happiness was short-lived as a hit and run motor vehicle struck the monument on 
15 August 2003 and damaged it beyond repair. The committee is currently working on several fund 
raisers in order to replace the monument and hopes to have it back in place by Memorial Day 2004 or 
Veterans Day 2004 at the latest. The Committee is made up of representatives from the Swampscott 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Swampscott American Legion and the North Shore Detachment of the 
Marine Corps League all of which are located in Swampscott. 

MEMORIAL DAY 

As has been the tradition for the past several years, the Principal of the Stanley School Ms. Carla 
Guarnieri and several of the 5th grade teachers brought volunteers from Stanley School two weeks prior 
to Memorial Day to place U.S. flags on the graves of veterans at Swampscott Cemetery. Also assisting 
with this task is the local troop of the Boy Scouts, overseeing this arduous and very time consuming task 
was Cemetery Superintendent Mr. Robert Vernava. The groups along with several other volunteers 
placed well over 1 000 flags. We could never express our appreciation enough for the selfless task these 
youngsters and adults perform on an annual basis. Their desire to "remember" our veterans in this truly 
special way is heart warming and greatly appreciated. On Memorial Day St. Johns the Baptist Church 
held a 10:00 AM Mass followed by a wreath laying at the flagpole overlooking Swampscott harbor in the 
lot at St. Johns. The wreath laying served as a reminder and also to honor all those who have been lost 
at sea. At 12:00 Noon members of the Swampscott Police Department raised the flag at the Swampscott 
Cemetery veterans plot to full staff to signify the commencement of the towns ceremonies. Color Guards 
representing the VFW, American Legion the Marine Corps League and the Swampscott Police 
Department were on hand. The service was officiated by Reverend Dean Petersen of the First Church of 
Swampscott. The ceremony was well attended by many members of the Board of Selectmen as well as 
other town officials and numerous town residents. Following the remarks of Reverend Petersen a rifle 
salute was performed, taps was sounded and a bagpipe performance concluded the ceremony Their is 



135 



no doubt that the recent concluded conflict in Iraq and the fact that many other men and women from 
Swampscott are still in harms prompted many residents to come to this years event, we can only hope 
that this will be more than a one time event. This ceremony is open to all and all are encouraged to 
attend. 

VETERANS DAY 

On the 1 1th day of the 1 1th month at 1 1 AM the traditional observance of Veterans Day begins. This 
year was a special year as we were unveiling a new Vietnam Veterans Honor Roll. A larger than usual 
crowd formed and Color Guards representing the Swampscott Police Department, the Swampscott Fire 
Department, the Swampscott VFW, American Legion and the Marine Corps League marched into place 
at Thompson Circle on Monument Avenue. Officiating the event was the Reverend Dean Petersen of the 
First Church in Swampscott who reminded us that it is incumbent upon all of us to remember our veterans 
and the sacrifices they have made to ensure our freedoms. Guests, who included members of the Board 
of Selectmen, Town Administrator as well a other officials, honored and prayed for our servicemen and 
women who are currently serving in harms way. Following the service a rifle salute was fired followed by 
taps with a bagpipe rendition of Amazing Grace concluding the ceremony. Immediately following the 
ceremony the new Swampscott Vietnam Veterans Honor Roll was unveiled by Reverend Petersen and 
myself and was met by much enthusiasm and gratitude by the veterans and residents who were in 
attendance. 
Respectfully submitted, 
H. Jim Schultz, Veterans Officer 



136 



WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Trustees 
Joseph J. Balsama, Chairman 
Eileen Ventresca, Secretary 
Thomas B. White, Jr., James H. Lilly 
Ida S. Pinto, Hugh (Jim) Shultz 
Jean F. Reardon, Paul E. Garland 
Barbara F. Eldridge 

General Information 

A $10,000 scholarship fund was established by vote of Town Meeting on March 28, 1950 
as a perpetual memorial to those who served in the Military Service defending our freedom. The 
first scholarship was awarded in 1951 for $250. In 1964, the Town Meeting appropriated an 
additional $10,000. Since that time, gifts have been received from numerous individual and 
organization in memory of loved relatives and friends. To date 263 Swampscott High School 
students have been awarded scholarships totaling $95,650. 
Changes In Personnel 

In July of 2002, Angelo Losano resigned as a trustee of the Swampscott War Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Barbara F. Eldridge was appointed by the selectmen in the fall of 2003 to be a 
member of the Board of Trustees. Eileen Ventresca, our long-time secretary, resigned from the 
Board on May 21, 2003. Paul E. Garland also resigned on May 21, 2003. Both of these 
resignations were effective on July 1 , 2003. Jean F. Reardon was elected secretary on May 21 , 
effective July 1 , 2003. The remaining trustees wish to thank the outgoing ones for their many 
years of dedicated service. 
Detail Of Changes In The Fund Balance 

Balance as of 7/1 /02 $1 22,676.98 

Donations (7/1/02-6/30/03) $1,495.00 

Interest (7/02-6/30/03) $3,273.92 

TOTAL $127,409.90 

Scholarships awarded July 1 , 2002 $4,400.00 

Balance June 30, 2003 $123, 045.90 

Six Scholarships Totaling $4,400 were awarded in July 2002 as follows: 

$1000 Vera Skuratousky (Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship) Binghamton University 
$1000 Maura Fields Arizona State University 

$700 Jared Jaffe Washington University 

of St. Louis 

$700 Lindsay Perry Stonehill College 

$500 Inna Furman Northeastern University 

$500 Rebecca Welch Brandeis University 

The trustees wish to thank everyone, who mad donations to the Swampscott War 
Memorial Scholarship Fund. Through your generosity, we are able to build up equity in the fund, 
thereby providing the opportunity for additional income from which the awards are granted. Each 
year a few Swampscott High School graduates, who continue on to higher education, will receive 
some financial assistance. 

Honor Roll of Current Donors (July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003) 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Balsama, Sylvia Drais, William H. Kelly, Natalie Leuzzi, Mr. & Mrs. 
Angelo Losano, Mary Lutz, Joseph Pinto, Josephine Redford, Adele Ruthman, Wayfarers Lodge 
A.F. & A.M. 

From July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003 Donations Were Made In Memory Of: 

Tex Herbert Baldwin, John Brotherhood, Frances Brown, Charles F. Buckland, Luther B. 
Campbell, John J. Cordero, Patricia F. Cudmore, John (Jackie) Doucette, Julia Fielding, Daniel A. 
Floro, Jean Francesconi, Emma Grant, Elmer Z. Haggman, Kimberly Lisa Hayes, Wendell J. 
Hennessy, George E. Higgins, Theresa Kenneally, Thomas F. Kiley, Francis N. Lang, Victor 
Leone, Joseph A Levesque, Leo Limberti, Hayward C. MacWhinnie, Brock Maher, Mary & Ernest 
Manchin, Theresa M. Mayo, Aileen S. Michaels, Abraham John Moore, Robert P. Newell, Sr., 
Marie Nickerson, Louis Parziali, Charles A. Prescott, Anna C. Price, Carole Quint, Scott D. Riley, 



137 



Peter A. Sawin, John W. Standish, Albion Perley Mason Starbard, Francis E. Surette, Everett A. 
Taylor, Guy Herbert Wayne, Jr., Thaddeus S. Wezdicki and David W. Wormwood, Jr. 
Wayfarer Lodge of Mason Memorial (July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003) Donations are in 
Memory Of: 

Tex Herbert Baldwin, Luther B. Campbell, Elmer Z. Haggman, Hayward C. MacWhinnie, 
Abram John Moore, Charles A. Prescott, Peter A Sawin, John W. Standish, Albion Perley Mason 
Starbard, Everett A. Taylor, Guy Herbert Wayne, Jr., and David W. Wormwood, Jr. 
Special Donation: 

William H. Kelly made a special donation in appreciation of the Wayfarers Lodge A.F. & 
A.M. for presiding at his installation as Master. 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
10-8-2002 TO 6-30-2003 

I was appointed as Sealer of Weights and Measure replacing John O'Hare who was the Sealer for 
over 30 years. The following is a report based on the past 8 months. 

In accordance with the Massachusetts State Laws pertaining to the Division of Standards there 
are several inspections that must be held. These inspections are done with certified equipment by the 
State of Massachusetts and maintained by the Town of Swampscott. During the year several meetings are 
required to maintain certification. There are over 86 scanner verifications, 65 scales and 135 gas station 
meters along with 3 pharmacy weights to be inspected. There are follow up inspections and complaints to 
be answered. 

As this is only an eight-month report, the above inspections have not all been completed in the 
past fiscal year. 

During this season I have completed 62 scales $372.00, 45 scanners for $800.00, 18 gas meters 
$144.00, and 28 pharmacy scales $520,00 for a total of $1368.00. 

I would like to thank the Town Administrator and Selectmen for their support for this past 
season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Francis Corcoran 



139 



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Public Schools 


Smith, Eleanor 


July 1, 2002 


Public Schools 


Spagnoli, Mary J. 


December 31 , 2002 


Public Schools 


Streeter, Donald 


July 1 , 2002 


Public Schools 


Thomas, Mark Noel 


September 30, 2002 


Housing Authority 


Watts, Jane Carter 


June 30, 2003 


Public Schools 



140 



SERVICE TO THE TOWN 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, the Board of Selectmen would like to take this 
opportunity to express its appreciation to the many wonderful employees for their dedication and 
commitment in providing quality services to the Town. The Board would also like to express 
gratitude to those who have served and those who continue to serve on the various Town 
Boards, Committees and Commissions. The Board recognizes the time and effort that is given to 
Town service and wish to thank you for your knowledge, support and interest in the Town. 



141 



IN MEMORIAM 



Wendell J. Hennessey 

Retired from Public Schools 
Died: August 16, 2002 

Ruth A. Lougee 

Retired from Police Department 
Died: September 4, 2002 

Theresa F. Kenneally 

Retired from Public Library 
Died: September 1 , 2002 

James M. Gilroy 

Retired from Police Department 
Died: June 5, 2003 

Aileen S. Michaels 

Retired from Public Schools 
Died July 25, 2002 

Virginia Earie 

Retired from Public Schools 
August 1 , 2002 

Stephen Tacelli 

Retired from Public Schools 
Died August 25, 2002 

Brock Maher 

Retired from Public Schools 
Died October 17, 2002 

Marguerite M. Condon 

Retired from Public Schools 
November 29, 2002 

Warren A. Stromberg 

Retired from Public Schools 
Died December 5, 2002 

Mary E. Selvage 

Retired from Public Schools 
February 23, 2003 

Joan DiMeno 

Retired from Public Schools 
Died April 25, 2003 



142 



FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 


FOR EMERGENCIES ONLY 


911 




POLICE-Business 


781-595-1111 




FIRE-Business 


781-595-4050 


INFORMATION ABOUT: 


CALL: 




Town Administrator 


Administrative Assistant 


781-596-8850 


Assessments 


Assessors 


781-596-8858 


Benefits (Employee Insurance) 


Assistant Treasurer 


781-596-8852 


Bicycle Licenses 


Police 


781-595-1111 


Bills & Accounts 


Town Accountant 


781-596-8811 


Birth Certificates 


Town Clerk 


781-596-8856 


Board of Appeals 


Secretary 


781 -536-8858 


Board of Selectmen 


Administrative Assistant 


781 -596-8850 


Building Permits 


Building Inspector 


781-596-8857 


Burial Permits 


Health Department 


781-596-8864 


Cemetery 


Cemetery 


781-596-8863 


Checks 


Town Treasurer 


781-596-9553 


Conservation 


Commission 


781-596-7512 


Council on Aging 


Council on Aging 


781-596-8866 


Death Certificates 


Town Clerk 


781-596-8856 


Dog Licenses 


Town Clerk 


781-596-8856 


Dogs-Lost & Found 


Animal Control Officer 


781 -595-1 1 1 1 


Elections 


Commissioners 


781-596-8855 


Engineering 


Public Works 


781-596-8860 


Entertainment Licenses 


Selectmen 


781-596-8850 


Fire Permits 


Fire Department 


781-595-4050 


Gas Permits 


Building Department 


781 -596-8857 


Housing Authority 


Executive Director 


781-593-5516 


Library 


Public Library 


781-596-8868 


Lights (Street) 


Selectmen 


781-596-8850 


Liquor Licenses 


Selectmen 


781-596-8850 


Marriage Certificates 


Town Clerk 


781-596-8856 


Milk Inspection 


Health Department 


781 -596-8864 


Parking Tickets 


Commissioner 


508-473-9660 


Parks & Playgrounds 


Public Works 


781-596-8860 


Plumbing Permits 


Building Department 


781-596-8857 


Public Housing 


Housing Authority 


781-593-5516 


Recreation 


Commission 


781-596-8854 


Schools 


School Department 


781-596-8802 


Sewers & Streets 


Public Works 


781-596-8860 


Tax Collections 


Tax Collector 


781-596-8856 


Tennis Permits 


Recreation 


781-596-8854 


Trash/Recyclable Collection 


Health Department 


781-596-8864 


Trees 


Public Works 


781-596-8860 


UCC Filings 


Town Clerk 


781-596-8856 


Veteran's Benefits 


Veteran's Services 


781-596-8853 


Voter Registration 


Election Office 


781-596-8855 


Water 


Public Works 


781-596-8860 


Weights & Measures 


Selectmen (Info only) 


781-596-8850 


Wiring Permits 


Building Department 


781-596-8857 


Worker's Compensation 


Administrator 


781-596-9553 


Yard Sale Permits 


Police 


781-595-1111 


Zoning 


Secretary 


781-596-8858 



143 



INDEX 

A 

Appointed by the Contributory Retirement Board and Selectmen 



and Elected by the Town Employees 

Contributory Retirement Board 11 

Appointed by the Mass. Emergency Response Commission 

Emergency Planning Committee 10 

Appointed by the Moderator 

Capital Improvements 9 

Finance Committee 9 

Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 9 

Appointed by Probate Court 

Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship Committee 10 

Appointed by the Selectmen 

Accountant 5 

Administrative Assistant 5 

Animal Control Officer 5 

Assistant Engineer 5 

Assistant Graves Officer 5 

Assistant Harbormasters 5 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 5 

Assistant Shellfish Constables 5 

Assistant Town Accountant 5 

Assistant Town Clerks 5 

Assistant Treasurer 5 

Assistant Veterans' Agent 5 

Assistant Wire Inspector 5 

Burial Agent 5 

Chief of Fire Department & Forest Warden 5 

Chief of Police & Keeper of the Lockup 5 

Clerk/Collector 5 

Constables for Serving Civil Process 5 

Constables to Post Warrants & Other Similar Work 5 

Director of Emergency Management 5 

Fence Viewers 5 

Gas & Plumbing Inspector 5 

Graves Officer 5 

Harbormaster 5 

Health Officer 5 

Inspector of Buildings & Smoke 5 

Junior Custodian 5 

Local Inspector 5 

Network Specialist 5 

Personnel Manager 5 

Public Health Nurse 5 

Senior Building Custodian 5 

Shellfish Constables 5 

Superintendent of Public Works & Town Engineer 5 

Town Administrator 5 

Town Counsel 5 

Treasurer 5 

Tree Warden 5 

Veterans' Service Agent 5 

Weights & Measures Inspector 5 

Wire Inspector 5 



144 



Appointed by the Selectmen and Moderator 

Personnel Board 10 

Appointed or Elected by Organizations of the Employees Affected 

Group Insurance Advisory Committee 11 

C 

Committees Appointed by Moderator 

Capital Improvement Study Committee 9 

Finance Committee 9 

Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 9 

Committees Appointed by the Selectmen 

ADA Oversight Committee 6 

Affirmative Action 6 

Board of Election Commissioners 6 

Board of Public Works 6 

Conservation Commission 6 

Council on Aging 6 

Cultural Council 6 

Design Selection Committee 6 

Earth Removal Advisory Committee 6 

Harbor Advisory Committee 6 

Historical Commission 6 

Insurance Advisory Committee 6 

Rails to Trails Committee 6 

Recreation Commission 7 

Revitalization Committee 7 

Safety/Security Committee 7 

Sailing Subcommittee 7 

Traffic Study Committee 7 

Swampscott Building Committee 6 

Technology Committee 7 

Traffic Study Committee 7 

Veterans' Affairs Committee 7 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee 7 

Zoning Board of Appeals 6 

D 

Democratic Town Committee 12 

E 

Elected Officials 

Assessors, Board of 4 

Constables 4 

Health, Board of 4 

Housing Authority 4 

Moderator 4 

Planning Board 4 

Public Library 4 

Selectmen, Board of 4 

School Committee 4 

F 

For Your Convenience 143 

G 

General Information 3 

I 

In Memoriam 142 

145 



R 

Reports 

Accounting Department 59 

Assessors, Board of 67 

Building Department 72 

Clerk 28 

Collector of Taxes 57 

Conservation Commission 73 

Contributory Retirement Board 119 

Council on Aging 74 

Earth Removal Advisory Committee 78 

Election Commissioners, Board of 80 

Emergency Management Agency 82 

Fire Department 83 

Harbor Advisory Committee 85 

Harbormaster 86 

Health, Board of 88 

Historical Commission 94 

Housing Authority 95 

Inspector of Weights & Measures 139 

MBTA Advisory Board 99 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 100 

N.S. Regional Vocational School District 102 

Personnel Board 1 08 

Planning Board 1 09 

Police Department 110 

Public Library 97 

Public Schools 120 

Public Works, Board of 117 

Recreation Commission 118 

Selectmen, Board of 14 

Technology Department 1 33 

Town Counsel 77 

Traffic Study Committee 1 34 

Treasurer 58 

Veterans' Services 1 35 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee 1 37 

Zoning Board of Appeals 70 

Representatives, Liaisons, Designees, Coordinators 

Clean Air & Oil Spill Coordinator 8 

Hazardous Waste Coordinator 8 

Labor Service Coordinator 8 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 8 

Mass. Bays Program Representative 8 

Mass. Water Resources Authority 8 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 8 

N.S. Regional Vocational School District Representative 8 

National Organization on Disability Liaison & Handicap Coordinator 8 

North Shore Task Force 8 

Right to Know Law Coordinator 8 

Winter Planning Coordinator 8 

Republican Town Committee 13 

Retirees 140 

S 

Service to the Town 141 

U 

Union Presidents 11 



146 



i